1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Bob Dylan wins Nobel Peace Prize for Literature!

Discussion in 'Personal' started by TCSC47, Oct 13, 2016.

Tags:
  1. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    Moreso than Joni Mitchell?
     
  2. jacob

    jacob Lead commenter

    .. and Rod Stewart has been knighted! What other national disgraces will we have next. They'll be saying that overblown puffed up liar Stephen Fry is a "National Treasure"! Hold on a minute .....
     
  3. cuteinpuce

    cuteinpuce Star commenter

    I guess one difference between the two of them as poets is that Tennyson actually wrote some poetry.
     
  4. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    Ouch!
     
  5. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    No matter how much he had blown is harmonica, twanged his guitar or abandoned Joan Baez he would not be remembered. It was the words that added to the sixties.
     
  6. HelenREMfan

    HelenREMfan Star commenter

    Well said.
    My ex was a Dylan fanatic and we really only went to see Dylan when he toured and pretty much no one else. So I feel that as someone very well acquainted with his work over 30+ years I am well placed to comment.
    I disagree with a few here in that I do consider Dylan a poet, whilst also a musician. The way he chose to deliver his work is a matter of some issue for people. I don't think Dylan was ever too concerned about what people thought of his voice. He uses his voice as at times an instrument, at others to affect the delivery of a song - to change its rhythm or how he wished to show emotion - or not as the case might be. He could change any performance but he rarely changed words. My ex was convinced though that he at a 60s Liverpool concert included the word "red" in his rendition of "Leopard-skin Pillbox hat" to acknowledge Liverpool's victory that day!
    Dylan wrote of war, of love, of many themes as do all poets. His lyrics have imagery and his words convey all that a world recognised poet would be proud of. He out-shines many renowned poets and thoroughly deserves the award.
    Whilst my ex was an ex for many good reasons I am saddened that he didn't live to see the honour bestowed no Dylan. He had an encyclopaedic knowledge of Dylan's words/works and could have done a far better job of this post than me to be honest.
    Whilst I had some issues with Dylan (the critic who praised his award but said that it didn't make Dylan any nicer a person, had it spot on - Dylan could have learned a lot from Mr Stipe! ) "Positively 4th Street" holds a major top 5 spot of favourite all time tracks/songs/lyrics for me!
     
    TCSC47 likes this.
  7. cuteinpuce

    cuteinpuce Star commenter

    There's the profundity of Forever Young:

    May God bless and keep you always
    May your wishes all come true
    May you always do for others
    And let others do for you
    May you build a ladder to the stars
    And climb on every rung
    May you stay forever young
    Forever young, forever young
    May you stay forever young.
    May you grow up to be righteous
    May you grow up to be true
    May you always know the truth
    And see the lights surrounding you
    May you always be courageous
    Stand upright and be strong
    May you stay forever young
    Forever young, forever young
    May you stay forever young.
    May your hands always be busy
    May…

    It's positively Shakespearean! Though for subtlety of poetic language, I think Wiggle Wiggle probably wins the prize...
     
    TCSC47 likes this.
  8. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    How many roads must a man walk down
    Before he can see a host of daffodillies?
    Yes and...
     
  9. cuteinpuce

    cuteinpuce Star commenter

    You walk into the room with your pencil in your hand
    You see somebody naked and you say, "Who is that man?"
    You try so hard but you don't understand
    Just what you will say when you get home
    Because something is happening here but you don't know what it is
    Do you, Mr. Jones?
    You raise up your head and you ask, "Is this where it is?"
    And somebody points to you and says, "It's his"
    And you say, "What's mine?" and somebody else says, "Well, what is?"
    And you say, "Oh my God, am I here all alone?"
    But something is happening and you don't know what it is
    Do you, Mr. Jones?
    You hand in your ticket and you go watch the geek
    Who immediately walks up to you when he hears you speak
    And says, "How does it feel to be such a freak?"
    And you…

    Sheer poetry from Ballad Of A Thin Man by the Nobel Laureate For Literature.
     
  10. Didactylos4

    Didactylos4 Star commenter

    It is indeed. :)
     
  11. cuteinpuce

    cuteinpuce Star commenter

    It's poor stuff, considered as poetry.

    If I pupil produced that as part of their homework, I suspect I'd tell them to try again and, this time, to put in a bit more effort.
     
  12. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    Hmm. I reckon you could swap bits of that with bits of Waiting for Godot without many people noticing.
     
  13. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    That's why I tell pupils never, ever to submit poetry for any kind of meaningful assessment.
     
  14. cuteinpuce

    cuteinpuce Star commenter

    ESTRAGON: What is it?
    VLADIMIR: I don't know. A willow.
    ESTRAGON: Where are the leaves?
    VLADIMIR: It must be dead.
    ESTRAGON: No more weeping.
    VLADIMIR: Or perhaps it's not the season.
    ESTRAGON: Looks to me more like a bush.
    VLADIMIR: A shrub.
    ESTRAGON: A bush.
    VLADIMIR: A—. What are you insinuating? That we've come to the wrong place?
    ESTRAGON: He should be here.
    VLADIMIR: He didn't say for sure he'd come.
    ESTRAGON: And if he doesn't come?
    VLADIMIR: We'll come back tomorrow.
    ESTRAGON: And then the day after tomorrow.
    VLADIMIR: Possibly.
    ESTRAGON: And so on.


    Hmm. You could have a point.

    On the other hand, perhaps if it was set to music... :)
     
  15. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    And indeed there will be time
    To wonder, “Do you dare?” and, “Do you dare?”
    Time to turn back and descend the stair,
    With a bald spot in the middle of your hair
    (They will say: “How his hair is growing thin!”)
    Your morning coat, your collar mounting firmly to the chin,
    Your necktie rich and modest, but asserted by a simple pin—
    (They will say: “But how his arms and legs are thin!”)
    You raise up your head and you ask, "Is this where it is?"
    And somebody points to you and says, "It's his"
    And you say, "What's mine?" and somebody else says, "Well, what is?"
    And you say, "Oh my God, am I here all alone?"
    But something is happening and you don't know what it is

     
  16. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Star commenter

    Absolutely agree. Bob Dylan picked up what was going on around him in the baby boomer generation and amplified it. In any aspect of art, surely that is what always happens. It is no criticism of his work though.

    Oh, but it did. It really did.
     
  17. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Star commenter

    You are mixing up different things. Our honours system is way different from the Nobel prizes. I also scorn the knighting of Stewart, or anybody else for that matter. As for Fry, that is merely public opinion.
     
  18. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Apparently he may not get it as the Nobel institute have said that they have not been able to contact him!
     
  19. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    I expect he's too busy writing a poem about it. I wonder whether he replies in poetry to his emails?
     

Share This Page