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Birth Trauma Association-did you know?!

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by hhhh, May 29, 2011.

  1. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    Apparently according to the birth trauma association, an elective CS is safer than a natural birth. I didn't know that, did anyone else? I had an emergency CS with my first. Have heard that women who requests CS for non medical reasons are to have psychological tests, is that true I wonder?
    I had known for a long time that most women GP have elective CS.
    While I would still have chosen to try for a nat birth, as unless you have lots of money/help, recoevering from CS with little ones needing you isn't easy, it does bother me that women are not given the choice of how to give birth, surely, as long as they are given all the facts, women who want a CS have just as much right to choose that as I had to choose not to?
    Also, apparently ELECTIVE CS are cheaper for the country than bad vaginal births.
     
  2. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    Apparently according to the birth trauma association, an elective CS is safer than a natural birth. I didn't know that, did anyone else? I had an emergency CS with my first. Have heard that women who requests CS for non medical reasons are to have psychological tests, is that true I wonder?
    I had known for a long time that most women GP have elective CS.
    While I would still have chosen to try for a nat birth, as unless you have lots of money/help, recoevering from CS with little ones needing you isn't easy, it does bother me that women are not given the choice of how to give birth, surely, as long as they are given all the facts, women who want a CS have just as much right to choose that as I had to choose not to?
    Also, apparently ELECTIVE CS are cheaper for the country than bad vaginal births.
     
  3. I have long been cynical about the joys of natura homebirth. Stitches in a very delicate place and piles from pushing like a large bunch of grapes meant I wasnt exactly jumping around immediately after my natural birth either.
     
  4. Having only had one birth- emergency c-section- after pushing... I feel I didn't get the best of either but, as long as the outcome is the same, it doesn't matter how they appear. I had a section, but my baby is perfect- so, does it matter how they appear? That moment where I held my little bundle was the same, just amazing. I will never forget the way she stared up at me, and the three following days where we spent just doing nothing together... It is making me all emotional thinking about it. I don't think I had any trouble bonding.
    I really don't believe it is helpful to fill a load of pregnant women with stories of bad childbirth- I hated it when I was pregnant and women would rush up and tell you all about their exprience. Many people have good experience too- so if you are pregnant and reading this- please, try and relax- it does help,
    although I had a section, I found hypnobirthing really helped the initial stages.
     
  5. I agree about the birth horror stories but to be honest as births go mine wasnt particularly traumatic or difficult. I'm just maling the point that it left me extremely sore. What I think is important though is tha
    t women who have caesarians are not left feeling like they have somehow failed. Making a baby is amazing, regardless of how he/she arrived.
     
  6. sweetluar

    sweetluar New commenter

    I had an elective cs and a natural birth (that was supposed be another cs, but baby was born early). I have to say that I much preferred the cs. I was a bit traumatised after my natural birth and found a bit hard to bound with baby at the beginning. However, I know that some people will find the other way round.....
     
  7. Chica77

    Chica77 New commenter

    I've been very lucky with both my children - short labours, giving birth with just gas and air and no stitches either time. I was out of hospital within 6 hours with my daughter. So i was glad I had natural births as it worked for me.
    I think that if you could chose to have an elective CS with no medical reason then maybe people wouldn't want to try for a natural birth? I don't see anything wrong with a CS and sometimes (from hearing stories) they seem really slow to do a CS when it's clearly needed.
    When I was having my daughter I was left alone in the delivery room for an emergency in the next room as the woman (who was being induced at the same time I was) had had bowel surgery as a child herself and had got into difficulties and ended up having emergency surgery. Seems she should've maybe had an elective CS in the first place. I felt really bad for her, but also a bit panicked as the midwife told me to hold on as long as I could in case I got into difficulties and there was no-one to help!!
     
  8. Most women GPs have elective C sections? That's something I didn't know. I personally don't think you should be allowed to elect to have a c section when there is absolutely no medical reason; however I don't think there's any question that a woman who has a pre existing condition or who has had an emergency c-section/ very traumatic natural birth, should be offered and have a c-section. A friend of mine tore so badly with her first that she was offered and took an elective and that was clearly the best option for her- it was hard to recover with two little ones but luckily her OH is a teacher and it was the summer hols! But mainly it removed the worry of havign to go through the labour again as she really suffered after her first.
    On the same topic, I thought there was a limit as to how many c sections a woman should have? How is Victoria Beckham going to have 4 of them?
     
  9. chocolateheaven

    chocolateheaven New commenter

    I'd love to see the evidence for this. I doubt very much that there is any at all - rubbish.
     
  10. chocolateheaven

    chocolateheaven New commenter

    "One London study published in the Lancet in 1996 reported that 31% of
    female obstetricians would personally prefer a caesarean birth. In the
    US, the figure is almost 50%."
    "It's important to remember that it is the obstetrician's and the
    surgeon's task to remedy the rarer complications and consequences of
    childbirth. Unlike midwives, who oversee successful, normal births every
    day, doctors bear witness to the worst-case scenarios.
    Inevitably
    this difference in experience manifests itself in an ongoing debate on
    how best to manage childbirth. Midwife groups advocate normal delivery
    and "natural" births while obstetricians tend to see medical
    intervention as a benefit rather than a bane."
    "Maternity experts across the board believe that a straightforward vaginal delivery is by far the best for both mother and baby."

    All quotes taken from an article in the Guardian on this very topic:
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/jul/11/nhs.health1

    Can't find any evidence anywhere to support the assertion that female GPs opt for this. I come from a medical background, grew up surrounded by GPs, midwives, nurses - male and female - and none of them have opted for caesarians. Maybe my perspective is skewed, but hate to see ludicrous and deliberately controversial statements made without a single shred of evidence offered to back it up.




     

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