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Best up to date reading catchup programmes?(upper KS2 & lower KS3)

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by senat, Jun 19, 2011.

  1. What are schools using?
    Readwrite Inc seems to be recomended by our local Sen lit support service but it is difficult to deliver unless pupils can be grouped and released from English classes. Also it is designed for KS1. Fresh start is too advanced and pupils have not been inspired by it.
    I have started to put my own programme together based on over learning and am using it with a small group of Yr6. It seems to be working but it will need countinueous development and lots of work initially.
    Is there anything else out there that would fit the bill?
     
  2. What are schools using?
    Readwrite Inc seems to be recomended by our local Sen lit support service but it is difficult to deliver unless pupils can be grouped and released from English classes. Also it is designed for KS1. Fresh start is too advanced and pupils have not been inspired by it.
    I have started to put my own programme together based on over learning and am using it with a small group of Yr6. It seems to be working but it will need countinueous development and lots of work initially.
    Is there anything else out there that would fit the bill?
     
  3. Thank you Susan
     
  4. I have recently tried to explain as clearly as I can manage what makes learning to read English exceptionally difficult. Perhaps that can be of some help to u? I believe that understanding why pupils find something hard to learn helps with teaching it.
    If English spelling was like other European writing systems, it would have around 50 spellings, something like the following 43 with a few extras (i.e. one spelling per sound, plus just a few variants):
    a, ai, air, ar, aw, b, ch, d, e, ee, er, f, g, h, i, ie, j, k, l, m, n, ng, o, oa, oi, oo, oo, or, ou, p, r, s, sh, -si- (vision), t, th, th, u, u-e, v-, w, x, z .
    English has 164 main spellings and also another 33 which are used in only 5 words or less. Some don’t involve extra learning for reading (such as the –er,-or, -ar endings). But in the course of learning to read, children have to learn to decode the following 123 spellings (or graphemes), and69 of those have more than one pronunciation:
    a, -able, a-e, ai, air, al, all, ar, are, -ary, -ate, au, -augh, aw, -ay, b, ca/o/ut, cc, ce/i, ch, -cial, -ck, -cy, d, -dge,
    e, -e, ea, ear, ee, e-e, eigh, eig, eir, er, ere, eo, -et, eu, ew, -ey, f, ga/go/gu, ge-/gi, -ge, gn,
    h, i, -i, -ible, ie, i-e, -ie, -igh, ir, is,
    j, k, kn, l, le, m, mb, mn, n, ng,
    o, -o, oa, oar, o-e, -oe, oi, ol, oo,
    -oor, or, ore, ou, ough, oul, our, ow, oy,
    p, ph, qu, qua, quar, r, -re, rh, s, sc, -se, sh, -sion, -ssion, -sure,
    t, -tch, th, -tion, -ture, u, u-e, -ue, ur,
    v-, -ve, w, wa, war, wh, wo, wor, wr,
    x, y-, -y, --y, y-e, z .
    If u cannot think of variant pronunciations for some of the above graphemes, see
    http://englishspellingproblems.blogspot.com/2009/12/reading-problems.html
     
  5. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    There's a thread on the SEN section about the Hickey multi-sensory approach that you might find helpful.
    Also, cheap and cheerful Toe by Toe? I know some people say it does not include enough overlearning for some dyslexics but if you look at the reviews on Amazon and on the Freda Cowling's website you'll see it has had some stunning results with a wide range of schoolchildren and adults.
     
  6. A lot of people who put their own programmes together find two sets of the various word lists on my website very useful:


    <font color="#0000ff">http://englishspellingproblems.co.uk/html/learning_to_read.html</font>
    <font color="#0000ff">www.englishspellingproblems.co.uk/html/sight_words</font>
    I used words from the first for teaching / revising the main patterns which pupils had difficulty grasping when I did learning support, but mixing in small doses from the second too.
    The a-e pattern (brave, cave, save...) would be easy to teach, if it wasn't for the likes of 'have, gravel, travel'. They have to be brought in as well bit by bit.


     
  7. In my school we use Catch Up Literacy - Its focus is around reading. The pack contains the lessons. resources and teaching guides. It does require a bit of training though. We have noticed a huge improvement in our children. Another one we are about to start is Sound Discovery - It cover speling and reading but is done phonetically. Again it has the teaching guides, resources and lesson plans. Hope this helps.
     
  8. Thanks all!
    We have so many struggling and non readers. Spelling is also a huge problem, it is a challenge that I would love to beat.

     
  9. Have you looked at Phonics International? It can help with slower-to-learn readers and spelling.
     
  10. Well if they can't read they can't spell. Reading Reflex is excellent. Toe by toe is death by boredom. I have been teaching SEN for years. You first need to know why they are not reading. Check first of all their phonological skill. A very quick and easy check on this is the Hatcher Sound Linkage assessment and programme. It may be old BUT IT WORKS! and it's cheap compared to some of the outrageous prices we are expected to pay these days for tests. I use lots of different programmes to suit the child I'm teaching cos there's a lot out there. Alpha to Omega is very good too. Hope that this is of help.
     
  11. We use Read, Write, Inc and are seeing excellent results. We feel the consolidation of phonics (we're a Junior School) has helped the children tremendously and techniques such as Fred Fingers are very practical and useful (for all our children). The books designed around the scheme are fantastic and support the children equally with their reading and spelling.


    We focus heavily on the Read, Write, Inc basics in Year 3 and use it as our spelling scheme throughout the school and also, for less able readers, as their Stage Book. Every class has the sound chart up on display and use the approaches as a whole class. Some children have more intensive practice of these with TAs, and also use the books and Sound Chart as part of the other scheme we have in place, Catch Up. We use Catch Up with a select number of children but have adapted the scheme to be slightly more in line with the foundations of Read, Write, Inc.
     
  12. takethatno1fan

    takethatno1fan New commenter

    I know a couple of local secondary schools use 'Rainbow Readers' and report excellent results.
     

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