1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Best time for an exchange trip?

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by morning star, May 22, 2012.

  1. morning star

    morning star New commenter

    My son (Year 8) has just finished his first year of German and is expecting to do it for GCSE.

    A friend has suggested that she organise an exchange for him to the village her family comes from. I am also thinking about a week at a residential course.

    When is the best time for one of these immersive experiences? I'm guessing that he needs a reasonable amount of German before it becomes worthwhile. Any thoughts?

    Also, does anyone know of good quality Deutsch fur Auslander courses? (And, umlauts apart, did my rusty 30 year old O level get that phrase correct?)
     
  2. morning star

    morning star New commenter

    My son (Year 8) has just finished his first year of German and is expecting to do it for GCSE.

    A friend has suggested that she organise an exchange for him to the village her family comes from. I am also thinking about a week at a residential course.

    When is the best time for one of these immersive experiences? I'm guessing that he needs a reasonable amount of German before it becomes worthwhile. Any thoughts?

    Also, does anyone know of good quality Deutsch fur Auslander courses? (And, umlauts apart, did my rusty 30 year old O level get that phrase correct?)
     
  3. delnon

    delnon Lead commenter

    Any time after Easter and before the end of September, when the tourist sites are open. Regrettably, exam pressures and overbearing SLTs often push for trips in March or November - brass monkey weather!
     
  4. I would say he can go whenever he feels confident enough to make himself understood in the most important situations. And when he's ready to try and speak German and to ask people to speak German to him, too. As nearly everybody speaks English, most people change the language when they notice that English is a person's first language. So he can basically spend months in Germany without having to speak a word of German if he doesn't say "Auf Deutsch, bitte!"
    For residential courses, I would recommend the Goethe Institute. They have lots of experience and special courses for young people in different boarding schools all over Germany. http://www.goethe.de/ins/de/spr/kuj/kur/enindex.htm
     

Share This Page