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best route to become a drama teacher

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by MacIrwin, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. Hi there,
    I am looking for anyone who can offer some advice on the best route on how to achieve my goal.
    I have an HND in Theatre studies, acting and performance and studied for 2 years to achieve this in my early twenties. Since gaining this I have worked in my community teaching after school, pre school and evening drama groups and classes. I have 10 years of teaching experience in my chosen area and I really would love to teach drama at primary level in schools.
    The question is, how do I get there? I have to work, so I cannot go off and do a degree in teacher training PGCE etc. I have looked into the registered teaching programme, and I could be available a few days a week to work in schools to achieve this, but there are so very few schools in the surrey area who are offering this opportunity.
    Also.. I don't really want to be a classroom teacher. I want to teach drama. I am so confused as I have searched the entire internet looking for what may be the next step to achieving this goal, but there is nothing about teaching drama specifically, just that I would have to do a degree, gain QTS, teach for a while in a classroom then eventually specialise in my subject, but I am 33 already and time is running out.
    does anybody out there know how I could approach this?
    Thank you :D


     
  2. Hi there,
    I am looking for anyone who can offer some advice on the best route on how to achieve my goal.
    I have an HND in Theatre studies, acting and performance and studied for 2 years to achieve this in my early twenties. Since gaining this I have worked in my community teaching after school, pre school and evening drama groups and classes. I have 10 years of teaching experience in my chosen area and I really would love to teach drama at primary level in schools.
    The question is, how do I get there? I have to work, so I cannot go off and do a degree in teacher training PGCE etc. I have looked into the registered teaching programme, and I could be available a few days a week to work in schools to achieve this, but there are so very few schools in the surrey area who are offering this opportunity.
    Also.. I don't really want to be a classroom teacher. I want to teach drama. I am so confused as I have searched the entire internet looking for what may be the next step to achieving this goal, but there is nothing about teaching drama specifically, just that I would have to do a degree, gain QTS, teach for a while in a classroom then eventually specialise in my subject, but I am 33 already and time is running out.
    does anybody out there know how I could approach this?
    Thank you :D


     
  3. Hi there. I think what you're looking for doesn't really exist, I'm afraid. In primary you would be a classroom teacher, it's pretty unlikely that you'd ever be hired as a drama specialist in a primary school as it's not part of the national curriculum. The classroom teacher usually covers all subjects; occasionally they'll get someone in for music or possibly PE. I've never heard of this happening with drama. In secondary, you are hired as a drama specialist, ie. I only teach drama throughout the day from Y7 to Y13. I'm slightly confused in your post about what you're looking to do - a drama specialist in a school is a classroom teacher. If this isn't what you're looking for I guess the alternatives would be doing stagecoach type out of school drama clubs or that sort of thing. Some private schools might hire people freelance to offer things like LAMDA. I don't know if you're qualified to teach that?


    If you are looking to be a drama specialist in a secondary school you would definitely need a degree. You could top up your HND perhaps? And then you would need a PGCE/GTP in drama which would take another year. You can't get a job as a teacher in a state school without these things, and I think it's pretty much the norm in private schools too.


    I hope that doesn't sound too negative. On the other hand, I know that my PGCE had people from 22 to 40-something so I definitely don't think time is running out!
     
  4. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    Good advice form ***.... There are not shortcuts really on offer that can avoid you training to get the qualifications you need. Another option is to freelance as an unqualified teacher offering curriculum related workshops at a set daily rate - though with qualified teachers being able to offer the same and thus not requiring another teacher present you may have to compete.
     
  5. On a positive note- I am a Primary Drama teacher...so they def. do exist!
     
  6. Really?! I've genuinely never heard of that in any school. Apologies if I've got that one wrong! :)
     
  7. Thank you to all who replied. Genuinly have been very confused. there is so little information out there on teaching drama to younger pupils. I definately do not want to work in secondary school and I wasn't lookingfor shortcuts, I just felt very confused with the different advice on several different sites, so this has been very helpful.
    I do want to work teaching drama with pupils under 12 mainly as this is where most of my experience lies and also I have very much enjoyed the work I have been doing in this area for many years now. I have been running private clubs, groups, afterschool, pre-school and lunch time clubs all over Surrey for many years now and have been teaching privately for over 10 years now. I have a degree in dance and an HND in theatre/acting so have found both of these very useful in my career so far. In the last few years I have put on large scale productions throughout Surrey working with community children to raise funds for charity and I just felt that maybe it was time to put my skills to use within a school setting.
    I really do not want to be a classroom teacher or teach other subjects, so thank you for all the advice as it has allowed me to think more clearly about my next steps. I know I am a great teacher in my chosen subject, but I really don't feel I would enjoy teaching other skills or subjects so maybe school based work isn't for me.
    Thank you again :)
     
  8. Living in Scotland and having trained in Scotland, I cant offer you much advice in terms of how you would gain work in primary schools in your area but if you have any links to schools - children of your own or friends with staff, perhaps off an after-school group? Then perhaps a school may employ you to teach on the credit of your expereince. However, you still need to be aware of curriculum and assessement etc etc etc. I learned through experiences that drama in education is a whole different ballgame to drama in the community (more paperwork for a start!, ha)
    I trained to be a secondary teacher but within the expressive arts you are seen as dual qualified so I spend one day teaching high school kids and 2 days working as a specialist within the primary sector,( I see myself as a secondary teacher and a primary specialist.)
    You have a great 'resume' there so dont give up!
    goodluck!
     
  9. I think you might be right that it would be far easier for you to continue with after school clubs. In the end, to be appointed as a teacher at a primary school you would need to have QTS. How about working freelance and offering workshops to primary schools to complement their literacy curriculum or to work with their topics in history/geography, etc? You could then extend it to middle schools if you have any in the area as you do say you'd like to work with kids up to about 12 years old.
     
  10. Look for a good local amateur theatre and offer to run the Youth Theatre - great start as they want to be there and then you should be able to put them into the main theatre for the actual show. I have always found that children in a theatre environment raise to higher levels than a school environment so this would be a great learning platform for you. You also have the support of the main theatre and they learn skills you may not yet know, lighting, sound, costume etc. If you want to try out a show go to http://www.educationalmusicals.com where shows from them have been performed in schools and theatres - as they come with everything to put a show on you will find it an easy route to start with. Good luck from a previous Youth Theatre Leader!
     
  11. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    You sound an ideal candiate for community arts development programs. Time was there were such jobs avertised in LEAs.... Keep your eyes peeled.
     
  12. Hi there have you ever thought about Pyjama Drama is teaching drama and creative play to children 6 months to 7 years. I'm doing it while studying part time for my pgce in drama. Check it out might not be u but you never know!
     

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