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Behavour - attacking other children

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by sam2tez, May 3, 2012.

  1. Hi, I have a child in my class who keeps attacking the other children either by pushing them over, scratching or kicking them. The child has got a diagnosis of ASD but is quite high functioning and is verbal. These behaviours usually happen when we are in a whole class group and I might choose another child instead of him to help. The children obviously takes turns but even if he has just helped to do something or had a turn, when I ask the next child he will repeatedly scream and shout and then physically attack the other child. This happens also when I ask another child a question instead of him. I've tried explaining to him that it is another Childs turn an then it will be his turn and that I can't always just ask him questions I have to ask the other children too. Also tried completely ignoring his screaming and shouting so he gets no reaction whatsoever from me (as it does seem as though he is doing it to get a reaction from me) also tried removing him from the group which doesn't seem to help either. He also screams and shouts and has begun to kick me if I speak to another adult. Any help/ideas will be greatly appreciated! Thank you
     
  2. Hi, I have a child in my class who keeps attacking the other children either by pushing them over, scratching or kicking them. The child has got a diagnosis of ASD but is quite high functioning and is verbal. These behaviours usually happen when we are in a whole class group and I might choose another child instead of him to help. The children obviously takes turns but even if he has just helped to do something or had a turn, when I ask the next child he will repeatedly scream and shout and then physically attack the other child. This happens also when I ask another child a question instead of him. I've tried explaining to him that it is another Childs turn an then it will be his turn and that I can't always just ask him questions I have to ask the other children too. Also tried completely ignoring his screaming and shouting so he gets no reaction whatsoever from me (as it does seem as though he is doing it to get a reaction from me) also tried removing him from the group which doesn't seem to help either. He also screams and shouts and has begun to kick me if I speak to another adult. Any help/ideas will be greatly appreciated! Thank you
     
  3. Wotton

    Wotton Established commenter

    Try social stories.
     
  4. I agree. I'd recommend books by Carol Gray.
     
  5. maggieDD

    maggieDD New commenter

    I look after a child similar to this and find that if you ignore him he will go to great measures to ensure that his behaviour cannot be ignored.
    As for social stories, have tried that, he is perfectly eloquent, knows exactly what to say in certain situations (when acting out scenarios) probably more than any other 6 year old in the class. So it's not a case of teaching him these skills because he has them.
    He understands rules perfectly and is keen to point them out to everyone else in the class but does not believe they apply to him. Now the other children let him always go first, let him win games, let him do anything simply because they're scared of his reaction if he doesn't get what he wants. And more worryingly, so do the teachers and head. Never are there any consequences for his outbursts, just a quick distraction then move on. I understand how this is the only way to prevent things escalating, however, he is not learning that it's unacceptable behaviour and therefore I can't see how his conduct will ever get better.

    Sorry I haven't helped with your original question!
     
  6. Aside from the social stories that people have reccomended on here, perhaps you could have lolly sticks/or tickets with all the children's names on them and randomly pick names out of a hat or container. That way the child will see that the system is fair and square and it would act as a visual aid to remind them of turn-taking.
     
  7. Perhaps a behaviour chart where he works towards something at the end of the week? in the past i have used a chart that is broken up into sessions where he gets a tick or a smiley face if be behaves appropriately during that time/lesson.
    The child must earn a certain amount per week to get a reward at the end of the week. This can also work on a day by day basis if he cannot maintain the focus for a week long period. When it comes to him getting a sad face it is key that you explain that he has decided to behave this way and that the rules (that he should agree on when the chart is set up and he is being positive) mean that he cannot be given a smiley face. That way you do not seem like such a baddy and he feels he keep some control.
     
  8. I taught a student who had been diagnosed as ASD but also had been Developmentally Delayed as an infant, preschooler and until he was about 5 had no basic verbal skills. When he was 7 he had 'caught' up with the rest of the class, and proved to have great understanding in maths.
    So...
    When I asked for an answer he would always shout out the correct answer ... often before anyone else had even finished thinking about the question... So the rest of the class would just write down his answer...
    He would also get upset if I asked him not to say the answer so that someone else could have the chance to get it right.
    A strategy that we came up with the suggestion of the mother was to have a small container on his desk. Each time I asked for an answer (especially in maths) I would walk past his desk and say that I KNEW that he had that answer correct and give him a button to put into his container.
    Within ten minutes he was sitting there happily - not telling anyone ealse the answer - with a huge grin on his face...
    His teacher knew that he had the answer correct and he had been given recognition for it...!!!
    At the end of the day I would allocate a sticker or small reward according to the number of buttons in his container...
    I had struggled with this boy for two terms - trying everything - before we gave this a try... and it worked for him.
     
  9. Lovely idea with the buttons! I might try something similar with my small group.
    On a similar theory, small whiteboards do well to stop calling out because children can just show that they know rather than need to call out. Its an obvious and regularly used tool but i feel they arent used enough by some teacher (myself included!). They work really well to keep kids focused on what they are doing/writing rather than other children answering questions ahead of them!
     

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