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Behavioural expectations in reception...

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by Rachwins, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. I start a new job teaching reception at a special school next month. I just wanted to clarify what other people's behaviour expectations are before I go marching in all guns blazing with the wrong approach!
    Obviously firm routines are the order of the day, it's more things like sitting down in a circle when asked, snack time etc. Transition morning showed that this was super challenging, we'd get three sat down, and the other four would be running amock! Getting some of them to sit on a chair when asked resulted in a lot of crying/squirming/shouting/biting - traumatising for everyone involved!
    Obviously this step needs to be made at some point, but do we do it on their first day, when everything is all new and super scary (but expectations are set) or do we leave it a few weeks and broach the sitting/listening/looking step once they're a little calmer, ultimately making it more difficult to set new expectations half-way in?
    My gut instinct is to set all my expectations from day one, as I would anywhere else, but is this too heavy handed?
    (edit: it's general sld - three asds, a couple of downs syndromes, a couple undiagnosed)
     
  2. I start a new job teaching reception at a special school next month. I just wanted to clarify what other people's behaviour expectations are before I go marching in all guns blazing with the wrong approach!
    Obviously firm routines are the order of the day, it's more things like sitting down in a circle when asked, snack time etc. Transition morning showed that this was super challenging, we'd get three sat down, and the other four would be running amock! Getting some of them to sit on a chair when asked resulted in a lot of crying/squirming/shouting/biting - traumatising for everyone involved!
    Obviously this step needs to be made at some point, but do we do it on their first day, when everything is all new and super scary (but expectations are set) or do we leave it a few weeks and broach the sitting/listening/looking step once they're a little calmer, ultimately making it more difficult to set new expectations half-way in?
    My gut instinct is to set all my expectations from day one, as I would anywhere else, but is this too heavy handed?
    (edit: it's general sld - three asds, a couple of downs syndromes, a couple undiagnosed)
     
  3. cs7

    cs7

    I agree that firm routines are the order of the day from the outset. Even if you are not actually completing any productive tasks for the fist few days (or week [​IMG] ), going through the motions of sitting down at a specific area for a short amount of time will begin to estalish a routine.

    I had a similar class to yours last year, and am about to begin with a new little bunch who also sound very similar. I found the best way to work was sitting little and often. We returned to the circle time table between each activity (accompined by a song), just to sit and check our next activity using a now and next visual timetable and it helped with structure and gettng used to sitting down. For those that really refuse to sit, provide distractors to encourage them to stay at the table and allow them to fidget or play with it whilst at the table. If they continue to leave the table, allow them to do so but bring them back for their turn, then allow them to leave again. If they are wandering around the room do not allow them to play or engage in anything else....you may have to ignore some screaming for a while! I use lots of symbols, visuals and signing to support behaviour and keep language to a minimum.

    Hope this helps in some way. If your bunch are anything like mine they will be hard work, scream a lot but when they start to settle in the results will be worth it and amazing. Good luck! x
     
  4. This could be my class for the last few years! My classroom is organised so that the tables are in one half of the class room facing the wall/windows, the cupboards divide the room leaving a gap in the middle for access. My TAs sit in this gap, I sit in the front of a horse shoe of tables. When it is time to sit (for whatever reason) we sing 'Are you sitting on a chair, are you ready to start' to any tune that fits! Basically no one is 'made' to sit down but there is a reward for those who are...raisins, small Mcdonald type toys, silly bits and pieces. Reward the behaviour you want. The TAs are there to stop anyone leaving the area. So long as three is one child on a chair you are already winning, you can sing the register song to that child when another one asks tell that that they must sit first etc etc. Talk to your TAs 'Oh dear I can't sing for Fred he's not sitting on a chair.' etc etc TAs will agree and repeat etc or say to the child quick quick then its your turn. For those who are not at this level you may have ask a TA to sit behind them to support them. Make the time you are sitting seconds in Sept and by July we have achieved more than 20mins of 'work'. Above all don't make an argument..as you already know you cannot collect/catch everyone and you must win. Never ask small children to do something that you are not sure you can make the do. The other thing is.....Soflty softly catchee monkey!
     
  5. Thank you for your thoughts, reassured me that I wasn't going to be demonising them too much/ expectations weren't too high!
    Hope the rest of your summer is filled with treats and good things!
     

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