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Behaviour

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by Omletgirl, May 22, 2012.

  1. I've been observing in a school for a few days and today I saw what was the best lesson yet. The kids were meant to stand behind their chairs whilst the teacher said "good morning" and then they were allowed to sit down. They had to respond to the register with "yes sir". The lesson was interactive with the use of visual aids. It was interesting as there was discussion and dialogue between teacher and pupil and the kids were immaculately behaved. Part of the lesson was spent writing(analysing some text) and there was no chatting. The kids worked well and the teacher clearly had high expectations.

    I described this class to another teacher and he said that it must have been a poor and boring lesson if there was no noise.

    Is this right? Do you really have to have chatter in the class to make a good lesson? Surely not? As far as I could see, the lesson was perfect.
     
  2. I've been observing in a school for a few days and today I saw what was the best lesson yet. The kids were meant to stand behind their chairs whilst the teacher said "good morning" and then they were allowed to sit down. They had to respond to the register with "yes sir". The lesson was interactive with the use of visual aids. It was interesting as there was discussion and dialogue between teacher and pupil and the kids were immaculately behaved. Part of the lesson was spent writing(analysing some text) and there was no chatting. The kids worked well and the teacher clearly had high expectations.

    I described this class to another teacher and he said that it must have been a poor and boring lesson if there was no noise.

    Is this right? Do you really have to have chatter in the class to make a good lesson? Surely not? As far as I could see, the lesson was perfect.
     
  3. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    I hate those kinds of lessons: when my year 9 class do it, it bothers me - but that is personal taste.
    I don't expect them them stand for me and say good morning; I do expect them to listen to me and to each other, and to work hard. I have high expectations, but I also enjoy the sounds of a busy classroom.
    Noise does not equal a poor lesson if it's productive.
    Silence does not always equal a perfect lesson.
     
  4. I suppose it was a complete contrast to a lesson I had witnessed the day before where the teacher constantly yelled at the class in a completely "lost it" kind of way. The kids in that class were totally uncontrolled and seemed to be doing hardly any work. There was no respect for the teacher but equally it was clear that the teacher disliked the class and did not want to be there. He was so out of control and angry that I felt extremely uncomfortable and I would have preferred to leave the room. I was truly shocked. It was a real lesson for me!
     
  5. primenumbers

    primenumbers New commenter

    If pupils talk to each other about the work then that would promote learning. But how could you be certain that they are not talking about something else. There is a fine line between those two and you can only achieve that if you have very strong behaviour management.
    If I have to choose between working quietly or pupils going off task when allowed to talk then I'd rather they sit there quietly.
    About the standing up behind chairs, do we sit down and say hello to the class? Do we address pupils by name or "oiiii, little *****". If we stand up and say good morning then I would expect my pupils to do exactly the same to me.
     
  6. F1sydney

    F1sydney New commenter

    Wow kids have to stand and say good morning, it would be great to see a level of respect in schools again.
     
  7. I tell you, this teacher who made them stand up and say good morning had the kids eating out of his hand! They were angels. This is in the same school where the teacher lost it and the kids were shouting at her. It is an inner city comp. Both classes were mixed ability.
    The strict teacher was respectful of the pupils and they were of him. I was truly impressed.
     
  8. I think it is less about what the teacher has them do and more about how he gest them to do it.
    I like my lessons to be quite noisy- I would say I am far from mean and the students are allowed to leave their seat and we do a lot of group work. This doesnt mean that nobody is learning, in fact it suits those that do have trouble concentrating as the learning happens in 'bite sizes' as apposed to a long hard slog.
    I reckon the teacher had good behaviour because of his STRUCTURE. A class with good structure is a class that is in the know of what is expected of them. The standing behind their chairs is a nice calm way to get your class to come in and is a quiet start to the lesson. I like to end my lessons this way, the class get their stuff together and stand in silence behind their chairs. I then let them go one by one depending on them being stood behind their own chair, making eye contact with me and being quiet. I think this leaves a good impression of the standards I expect and a positive attitude for the class to come back to me the next time I teach them.
     
  9. I am in my final few weeks of a Primary PGCE. I am teaching in Reception, a place where good behaviour is praised and modelled. One of the HLTA has used a wonderful book called 'Teaching Children To Listen' by Jacqui Woodcock and Liz Spooner for her dissertation focus. We use the strategies in the book everyday (this tricky class is responding well). It has become so well respected that the Headteacher has decided to adopt these strategies throughout the primary school....I know you are working within the secondary age group, but the foundations of good behaviour and listening skills (ready for learning) must surely be transferable.. Good luck.
     

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