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Behaviour

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by l_howard87, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. Hello
    I am after some tips and advice.
    I have a small bottom set class and there are a number of large characters in this class. One child in particular I sat at the back so that he couldn't turn around and distract, then he claimed he couldn't see. He is now at the front constantly turning round.
    A few of the other members of the class once distracted lose all focus. I am being observed with this class in a few weeks and I am worried about the lesson as the pace is often affected by poor behaviour.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Hello
    I am after some tips and advice.
    I have a small bottom set class and there are a number of large characters in this class. One child in particular I sat at the back so that he couldn't turn around and distract, then he claimed he couldn't see. He is now at the front constantly turning round.
    A few of the other members of the class once distracted lose all focus. I am being observed with this class in a few weeks and I am worried about the lesson as the pace is often affected by poor behaviour.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated!
     
  3. Hi
    There is a behaviour forum if you want one of the specialists to help. There a couple of really good people who can offer good suggestions.
    I will ask:
    Why do you feel the pupil is not subscribing to your expectations in the maths classroom?
     
  4. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    With a group like this I have found that you need to build up to whole class teaching and, even when you do, keep it as short as possible.
    Start off with lots of straight forward activities that students can easily start and work on independently. This might not have a lot of content but while they are occupied you can move around and get them onto the next step individually. What topics are you covering at the moment?
    If they are doing something, even if it is only colouring in percentages on a 100 grid, then you can start off by praising them which helps. I move around the room marking work with a sheet of stickers or a stamper to give an incentive for them to keep on task and to make progress.
    Do you have any support? If so are they clear on their role?
     
  5. Contact parents, suggest that as their son is having such problems seeing a large whiteboard from 4 metres away that they might wish to have his eyes checked.
    When they insist their childs eyes are fine, let them know about the problems with constant turning round and distracting the class and ask for their support.


     
  6. Thanks I am going to try a different approach next lesson. We are currently looking at negative numbers.
    They are a class I have only jusst started with as there has been a timetable change this term. I am not sure if it is just the class trying it with a new teacher or not.
    I don't have regular support it is if somebody is free, which is frustrating as having the extra person moving around the room is excellent.
     
  7. Is that approach supported by your school? (Thats a question rather than a statement) [​IMG]
     
  8. I was about to suggest the same thing (i'm primary though- if it makes a difference!). I would definitely ring parents on the pretence of being concerned about the child's eyesight!
    I agree with previous poster's advice of giving them 'busy' work first, then trying to teach them once you have a more settled classroom. Good luck!
     
  9. Hmm it could be a matter of good old fashioned discipline, follow whatever strategies the school has put in place that the students are use too. Obviously it's not as simple as that, but it might be that he just needs to be told off!
     
  10. Who is observing you? Sometimes its not a bad thing for SMT to see what a pupil's behaviour is really like!
     

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