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Behaviour training

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by Sleedswake, Jan 3, 2019.

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  1. Sleedswake

    Sleedswake New commenter

    Hi, new member here. This new year I want to ‘give something back’ wherever I can and would like to assist student teachers if possible. For the past 20 odd years I have worked in the Leeds/Wakefield area in secondary schools organizing and running Isolation Units and working as a Behaviour Officer within the Pastoral Department. I have worked with very talented young people but most of the time I have worked with the more challenging students within schools. Often I have met student teachers who have very little knowledge of how a behaviour system is organized and how a withdrawal unit is run, which of course is there to assist all staff and particularly student teachers. I’d like to offer my insight into what I do on a daily basis, why I do it, and some of the varied experiences I have encountered. I’d like to visit local universities and provide workshops, or as a guest speaker and provide an insight about behaviour in secondary schools to student teachers ideally before their school placements begin. I’m asking fellow members for comments regarding my plans - do you think it would be worthwhile and/or useful? I’d particularly welcome thoughts from any student teachers. Thanks.
     
  2. thin_ice

    thin_ice New commenter

    Contact the ITT/ faculty of education at Universities.
    Some have decent budgets. Some have nowt.
    Some will have staff who have written books on the subject. Some will have hardly anyone with the knowledge.

    A very wide range of opportunity. Best to approach them individually.

    My partner has been a programme leader in three HEs. All different.

    Just because you’ve met student teachers who’ve claimed to know nothing doesn’t mean that they have had no lectures on it.

    But ITT is only INITIAL training, so what you have in mind could be very useful.

    You might get a Visiting Lecturer booking. Some pay £60 per hour, some £24 an hour and others in between. Unlikely to get travel expenses. Or set your own fee.

    Good luck. Hope it works for you.
     
  3. Sleedswake

    Sleedswake New commenter

    Thank you for taking the time to reply and your suggestions are very helpful.

    As stated I want to give something back in terms of knowledge and experience as a volunteer and so don't really want paying.

    I appreciate that student teachers will receive some training regarding behaviour management but it seems 'patchy' for want of a better word. Many students arrive at my school ill prepared for the behaviour of some pupils and once they begin their school based training everyone is so busy that they don't like to approach people for assistance, or unfortunately staff don't give them the time and help they deserve - too often they are left to 'sink or swim'.

    I have worked alongside students who went on to become Olympians, international sports stars, nationally renown dancers and international dj's. Mainly however I have worked alongside students whose behaviour was very challenging, some going on to commit murder, rape armed robbery, drug dealing and violent assault etc.

    What I wish to provide ITT students from my experience over the years is: explain how a behaviour policy works (or doesn't!), the procedures that we follow, how I organize my isolation unit and the rationale behind it, how I attempt to modify behaviour and some of the strategies used when misbehaviour occurs and provide useful anecdotes that helped improve practice.

    I will follow up your suggestions and see where it leads. If I have any questions in the future am I ok in contacting you?

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019

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