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behaviour strategies needed

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Rosieett, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. My class is on the whole, well behaved - when in the classroom. They respond to praise and the various sanctions. The problem I'm having now, is that within the last few weeks, certain individuals from the class have been 'playing up' other teachers/members of staff outside the classroom and around the school, for example in the dining hall they're answering back and being rude. Why can't they be 'good' for everyone else and not just for me? Does anyone have any strategies because my class is getting a reputation due to the few miscreants. I somehow feel it's my fault and my responsibility. Is it? I wasn't aware of any problems until recently. At the moment, I'm being moaned at about certain individuals on a regular basis. please help. Thank you.
     
  2. My class is on the whole, well behaved - when in the classroom. They respond to praise and the various sanctions. The problem I'm having now, is that within the last few weeks, certain individuals from the class have been 'playing up' other teachers/members of staff outside the classroom and around the school, for example in the dining hall they're answering back and being rude. Why can't they be 'good' for everyone else and not just for me? Does anyone have any strategies because my class is getting a reputation due to the few miscreants. I somehow feel it's my fault and my responsibility. Is it? I wasn't aware of any problems until recently. At the moment, I'm being moaned at about certain individuals on a regular basis. please help. Thank you.
     
  3. My suggestion would be to put the chosen few on report as a starter, just because they're good for you it doesn't entitle them to behave like an a*** elsewhere. While I understand that people come to you as their tutor, you are not responsible for what happens in other people's classrooms, they are. I would suggest that you take a supportive role with members of staff that are having issues with them and find some time to discuss the problems and strategies that seem to be working with you that might be spread to the other sessions. I have no idea why you feel it's your fault, you are responsible for them in your classroom but you can't police them throughout the entire school day. Sanctions should be applied for their inappropriate behaviour and if the process in your school is that misdemeanours reported to you are your responsibility to deal with then you should apply the appropriate disciplinary measure. The other approach would be to spend some time discussing behaviour and what is appropriate on school premises.
     
  4. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    You cannot be expected to be their consciences when they aren't with you- the other teachers appear to expect you to possess the Jedi Mind trick. But remote control behaviour management hasn't been invented yet, and it's a credit to you that you've got a difficult class behaving for YOU. Perhaps you could offer some advice to the teachers for whom they misbehave, to point them in the right direction with behaviour. The class report is a good idea, although it often turns into you having to run behaviour management for everyone else. Getting good behaviour out of kids is everyone's responsibility, and I shudder when I hear teachers who don't want to get involved moan about kids, when what the kids need is to see some consistency of approach from all adults involved.
    It's not your fault, and it's only indirectly your responsibility. Help to empower the other teachers to do things as well as you.If anyone moans, ask them what they've done to improve the situation. If their answer is 'Had a moan at you,' then they aren't doing their jobs properly.
    Good luck
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  5. When a staff member tells you a problem share with them what has worked for you and suggest they trial it-
     
  6. Random175

    Random175 New commenter

    If another member of staff has a moan, say 'when is their detention?' in an interested and supportive fashion. When they say they haven't set one, smile sweetly and in the nicest tone say there is not much you can follow up with until they have issued their sanction.
     
  7. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    And that's. A smackdown. Couldn't agree more.
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  8. Dragonlady30

    Dragonlady30 Star commenter

    Absolutely!!

    It would appear that other staff have benefitted from your control and now it's time for them to set their own standards-not slide along on your coat tails. (All this is, of course, assuming no DT has been set!)
    When I have had a good relationship with a student who is being a pain elsewhere, I often try to appeal to that relationship-'What's going on? I had my lunch interrupted by Mr so and so because you'd been playing up in their class. What's the story?' Usually, one can get the story-often nothing to do with Mr so and so's lesson but something else.Where possible, I try to help the student to resolve the situation or give them support to resolve it.
    I always encouraged my students to apologise.
     
  9. Zadok1

    Zadok1 New commenter

    I would 'mother' them! If they're being good for you then it means they respect you and want to be in your favour... you've done a great job of getting them there. The next step is to take on the 'mother' role and tell them how disappointed and let down you feel when you hear about them misbehaving for others, how you are usually so proud of them and how much you enjoy telling the other staff how great they are, but the few are making you feel stupid because you're saying how fantastic they are and others are telling you that they are not. Lay on the guilt trip... it does work! I don't think it's negative to 'manipulate' kids in this way purely because the loyalty you are trying to build is a positive emotion that might just transfer to other aspects of their lives. The other thing that is vital is to deal with individual incidents as soon as you learn of them. Tell the individual how shocked you are, how let down you feel and how you expect better of them... then tell them that you expect them to have apologised to the member of staff before the end of the day. Leave them to do it for themselves... you may be surprised how many will. Obviously you need to check and follow up. It's worth pointing out that they would never behave towards you in the same way and that the other member of staff is 'your friend' and it upsets you when they upset your friends, it's a scenario they can relate to and I always think it's worth reminding kids that we too are humans.
     
  10. You are not at fault over this but you do have the tools to stop it!

    I am regularly told by other teachers that certain kids in my class are 'playing up' in their classes. I have teachers that tell me they cannot control a child I taught years ago and still shows respect for me when they do not for present teachers.

    Unfortunately you probably cannot sit and articulate exactly what it is that makes the kids behave for you and not others. You cannot pin-point the moment when the respect for you and what you do for them ensured good behaviour for you. Most good teachers can't - they just do it!

    Talk to the class. Let them know how upset you are when you hear bad things about them. Show them that you care about them, to only in your classroom, but everywhere else. Let them know that they are not only letting you down, but letting themselves down too. Peer pressure for positive behaviour works tremendously. Students will start telling you that "X" was good today in the corridor and watch you praise the good behaviour.

    Remember, if kids are only noticed when they are doing bad, they will continue because they get noticed. If you change that to noticing good behaviour they will want to behave better!
     

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