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BEHAVIOUR STRATEGIES 101

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Crazy Frog, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. good stuff, i do most of these helps sometimes. The pupls at my school mentally need to be put back in nursery. They are so immature and have no sense of belonging.
     
  2. Does anyone know of any ways in which to deal with students who constantly ask you if you are a "sixth former" or in "year 10."

    I'm a PGCE student, and I am only 22. I know that i look quite young, but the students just keep pushing this point with me.
    I've tried shrugging it off, reassuring them that i am in fact old enough to teach them, but they still persist.

    I knew i would have trouble with this before i started training, but i'm running out of ideas as to how to deal with this now.
     
  3. What about those students who always ask to go to the loo in the middle of lessons?

    Say no and you'll get a load of abuse about "wetting myself" etc. - I've found saying

    "OK but obviously I don't want you to miss out on your work - at the end of the lesson, once everyone is gone, we'll go over the work you miss together."

    "But you can't give me a detention for going to the loo!"

    "Oh sorry - it's not a detention - I'm just giving up some of my break / lunch to make sure you don't miss out and get behind. You don't need to thank me for giving up this time but it would be nice and polite."

    "Oh I'll wait then."

    "But you just said it was urgent. Off you go." I then insist that they go to the loo and make sure they do (at least) double time as I want to make sure they are really really sure of the work.

    They, and others in the class, don't ask again without having very very good reason.

    And when parents phone in (which they do once in a while) shouting from the rafters about detentions for needing a wee - "sorry you seem to be misinformed - it wasn't a detention, I made that clear, I just gave up my break to make sure they din't miss out and get behind. We wouldn't want them to get behind would we?"
     
  4. Re: Post 22
    Never-a-dull-day, I remember what it was like to be a very young teacher in a secondary school. It was the mid-nineties when I started and was unfortunately the era of flowery skirts and Doc Martens! Not a good look!

    If the kids are asking whether you are a year 10 or 6th former, have you considered what you are wearing? Sometimes dressing a little more formally can work wonders, particularly if you are blessed with youthful looks. Also, with the increase in affordable, reasonable quality suits and jackets from places like New Look, it doesn't have to cost a fortune.
     
  5. If they continue to ask if you are a pupil, just tell them they've made your day.
     
  6. Generally, i wear either a suit, or shirt, jumper and trousers. I always try to make myself look older and more professional but nothing seems to be working. I am very young looking (everyone seems to call it a blessing, i'm starting to think otherwise) and the constant questioning from pupils is really starting to get to me.
     
  7. Post 23: Maths HOD, I cured this with one girl in my year 10 by offering her the bin and said we'd all look the other way whilst she "went". She hasn't mentioned it since.

    I still giggle at the look on her face, she really wasn't too sure.

    Yes, I know this could have backfired. You have to know the class before pulling stunts!

    MH
     
  8. Had a fair number of pupils 'rebelling' during the lesson. Felt like I had lost control. Fortunately my classroom has a smartboard, whilst the pupils were having their self-indulgent rammie, i calmly sat down and started typing on the computer. I noted down names and what they were doing, after a minute i switched on the smartboard, so my commentary on their behaviour was displayed. The offending pupils were embarrassed, I told them it was entirely up to them whether I sent this as an e-mail to the depute head.
     
  9. not sure if this is a good idea But it did work- a colleague of mine once stopped a boy messing around a textiles room - he had climbed into a large plastic bin full of fabric which she promptly pushed underneath a big workbench- he couldnt get out,class in tatters- child embarrassed- problem solved!!
     
  10. Hey Crazy Frog, this is good stuff. I wrote an essay on behaviour management strategies late 2006 and I could have done with your insight. Please keep it up
     
  11. casper

    casper New commenter

    I have a blacck important looking bnote book, if kids are playing up I find this to be quite effective. Look at them look and hard and then write something down in your book. It could be rubbish, but they will think you have looged their names. This works well with low level disruption. Nips it in the bud.
     
  12. Write positive comments in it too... You'll have shedloads of stuff to say come parents evening. :D
     
  13. TO: tophotchef46

    Funny - sounds just like my year 10 - although they don't swear at me. They think I am **** but I know better because I have massive success with other classes in terms of relationship with them and behaviour of them. So I just ignore year 10 where they think I am a **** teacher. They are unhappy generally in the school and I was told in Year 7 were "rewarded" for every little thing as part of a new strategy that was applied to that year group. Cleary it was an error. That is why they turned out the way they are and the year group eveyone hates the most - even the pupils. Year 11 are nice. Year 9 are nice.

    If a pupil swore at me then he/she are excluded for a lesson by me - or two lessons if I feel like it. SLT can't argue with me because swearing at a teacher IS wrong and even they would be forced to agree with that. If SLT mess me about then phoning parents is my last resort and I would phone home, get the ok to excude the pupil by speaking tactfully with parents and speaking about making an example for my class rather than anything personal to do with that pupil - and then do it regardless of SLT. If SLT come back to you - then say you have the OK from parents as they understand that an example must be made and then they may back down.

    Hope that helps.
     
  14. To pixie_chick

    I was marking - three books per web post. Somehow you have to motivate yorself to get through it. :)
     
  15. TO: florenceh

    Yes - you do loose heart planning brill lessons because of the way they are and their talking as you are teaching - also - working for an SLT who are **** - you loose heart there and think "why should I" because they don't motivate or inspire you to not want to let them down. You just couldn't care less. Good leaders can inspire staff. Bad leaders can't.

    I'll tell you how I get through things. Try my next teaching tip below......
     
  16. 12. What if you have SLT who are useless and cannot motivate or inspire you. What if you have some nice classes but some horrible ones and your SLT just wish to ignore them. So you don't feel motivated in your planning because of it.

    My tip is to think of the kids in the classes you like and motivate yourself that way. Plan their lessons first when starting your planning and do the other classes last. Even if planning properly for all classes - the plans done last are never as good as the ones done first when you are fresh - so why not make the horrible classes last and it is their just reward.
     
  17. 13. What if behaviour problems affect your targets. SLT are not happy to help you with behaviour but more than happy to blame you if you don't get them their targets!

    My advice - Your school may push some pupils who misbehave for a C or above and make you feel you have failed if they don't get that C. But don't let them make you feel bad. Think! - do the pupils deserve their targets. What if you got an A or a B? Does that rotten pupil deserve to quote such a grade to an employer that is similar to yours (and you worked your socks off for it) or does he/she deseve a D or an E as that reflects their effort.

    When SLT call - show them a behaviour chart. Things that happened and under the heading of action from SLT show them a big list of NONE NONE NONE, with an odd one thrown in like "SLT spoke to pupil - no other action taken" whcih actually sound worse than NONE.

    At the end of the day - SLT will back down. They won't push for WHY against you as they know you have all the right answers as to why. They will pick on a more unprepared staff member.
     
  18. To never-a-dull-day

    Make a joke of it. "Shhhhhhsss! Don't tell the school. They haven't realised yet" and that sort of thing. Some will know you are messing about and some will think you are serious. The other pupils will laugh at them for being idiots and believing you.

    The topic should go away soon as you look as if you want it to stay. If you ever want a topic to go away and keep pushing for that - it will stick in their memories.
     
  19. 14 - Toilet Breaks in the middle of lessons.

    My strategy is very similar to "MathsHODs" strategy. I gave 5 minute detentions for toilet breaks - but now I will re-word what I say as I think "MathsHOD" got it spot on with.....

    Say "no" and you'll get a load of abuse about "wetting myself" etc. - I've found that saying.... "OK but obviously I don't want you to miss out on your work - at the end of the lesson, once everyone is gone, we'll go over the work you miss together."

    "But you can't give me a detention for going to the loo!"

    "Oh it's not a detention - I'm just giving up some of my break / lunch to make sure you don't miss out and get behind. You don't need to thank me for giving up this time but it would be nice and polite."

    "Oh I'll wait then."

    "But you just said it was urgent. Off you go." I then insist that they go to the loo and make sure they do (at least) double time as I want to make sure they are really really sure of the work. They, and others in the class, don't ask again without having very very good reason.
     
  20. 15. Class totally out of control?

    "Jane the stressed" is credited with number 15. I have never thought of this one to be honest. But it is an excellent idea. The "threat" of sending often works better than actually informing HOD/SLT I have found with other things. Because if SLT are **** and do nothing, then the pupils will say (if you ever try it twice) "you let them know last time and nothing happened." At least this way you have plenty of chances to use this one by them knowing that "phew! - my teacher didn't let SLT know - let's be good for a bit until he/she has forgot about that day."

    Nice one Jane!
     

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