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Behaviour management tips for NQT

Discussion in 'Primary' started by celago22, Aug 5, 2018.

  1. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    We'd all hate it if someone publicly mentioned that we had the worst handwriting when marking. Or that we used the worst language in the staffroom. Or that.... If we'd not do it to adults, with generally more robust self esteem, then we shouldn't do it to children.
     
  2. sparklepig2002

    sparklepig2002 Star commenter

    If I want my class to stop what they are doing, I raise my hand. As soon as a child sees that, they raise theirs too and they stop what they are doing. It works very well.

    Sometimes I clap a rhythm-they clap it back. That also gets their attention straight away and works well.

    Try a few different strategies then stick to one that works for you and your class.
     
    celago22 likes this.
  3. lardylady

    lardylady Star commenter

    To be fair, though, the children in the classroom know full well who's misbehaving, so it's not the same thing at all. Your analogy would work if it were a scenario such as two staff members talking in a staff meeting while someone else was giving a presentation and the two staff members in question were told to be quiet and to listen. I actually can't see a problem with that either.
     
  4. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    It’s about teaching high quality, interesting lessons and creating a culture where all effort and achievement is recognised and rewarded. This is mainly accomplished through mutual respect and the building of a strong rapport.

    Traffic lights, marbles, cards, stickers, charters, suns/clouds, names on laminated things, lolly sticks, boxes of s*** etc. are all irrelevant - it’s all about YOU!
     
    fly, Ne11y and celago22 like this.
  5. lardylady

    lardylady Star commenter

  6. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    You need to find your own way and do your own thing. You will make mistakes.
    the best advice of the lot, try things, ditch things.
    Be wary of any "coach" who tries to tell you that there is only one way, some do. Complete garbage!
    If you have other teachers in your year group and will be swapping groups at any time for say spellings, Maths, English..... Then its better if you agree some core ideas before you start.

    I didn't see mentioned the very simplest of the lot:
    a quiet word as children arrive or leave you room or school "really good session" "A bit fidgity this morning, run around a lot at break, I expect better afterwards."
    Even more, make a point of taking to parents as they arrive and leave at the end of the day, positive comments whenever you possible can, but don't be frightened to be negative as well

    and, there will be behaviour problems at break and lunchtimes especially for some children returning to school after being let do whatever they like for 6 weeks.
    So stop teaching 5 or even 10 mins before the breaks initially and discuss (ask them) what is expected during play times. My last head insisted that the whole school did this on a regular basis and it made a real difference. And if there are issues, don't waste the FIRST ten minutes after break dealing with the squabbles, deal with them during the start of next break as a reminder of what is expected
     
  7. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Hmmm that kind of thing happens in my school...but no one writes the names up on the board for a semi permanent record.
     
  8. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    This is exactly what I want to achieve. The key point in September is to develop relationships and expectations.
     
  9. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    Thanks for the reply. I will definitely use the positive reinforcement of expectations before breaktime and lunchtime. Involving parents is also important and the school has a system of cards which we send home in different circumstances... I will use these sparingly.
     
    hammie likes this.
  10. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    I do agree with you but that's the school behaviour policy so don't have a choice but to use it although I hope that the positive reinforcement works and that names on board is only used as a last resort. It would be wrong to publicly shame a child for making a mistake in their work but that's a completely different kettle of fish. I feel that sometimes children need to know the effects of their behaviour.
     
  11. sparklepig2002

    sparklepig2002 Star commenter

    It's very refreshing to come across a poster with so much enthusiasm for teaching. Take your enthusiasm into your class. You will be fine. I wish you the very best of luck.
     
    celago22, fly, hammie and 1 other person like this.
  12. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    Thank you sparklepig2002! I will update everyone on how it all goes. Thank you so much for the advice, it is very much appreciated and I will definitely take it all on board :)
     
  13. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Just make the chart of names on the board and have it there so the powers that be see it. Then you can't get in to trouble for not following school policy. No reason for you to actually ever write anyone's name on it though. ;)
    Absolutely. And the effect is that they have disrupted learning, or hurt someone's feelings, or broken some equipment, or similar. A name written up in public for all visitors to the room to see, is not an effect of poor behaviour by a child, it is a choice of the teacher.
     
  14. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    That sounds ideal! If only every class was like this. I had some awful behaviour on placement... Kicking other students, crawling underneath tables, wiping their names off the board (lol), throwing things, running out of class, it was absolutely horrendous.
     
  15. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    We have a system where children move their names up and down... I can't get away from using that but will try to just use the positive side of it. I agree, in my experience a name on the board doesn't really work with every child but on the flip side handing out coloured cards to the child with a consequence has the potential to be overused. I'm of the opinion that children misbehave for a reason and I'd rather ask them what can be done to help them rather than punish them.
     
  16. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    LOL Just never remember to ask anyone to move their name...they'll soon forget about it.
     
  17. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    my experience is that the move your name up is far more important, within a few days of getting things established I hardly ever move anybody down, but lots of up. I don't write names but print off lots of laminated name cards for use on all sorts of things.

    One tip I was given by a very good coach/young deputy head was to make sure you pick on the angelic children when they deserve it, the effect of saying their name when they are off task has a very interesting impact on the rest of the class. I think we all like to know that no one is immune from getting it wrong.
    With the "favourites it can be very easy to just give them a lesser response than the constantly naughty types for the same individual incident.
     
  18. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    hammie, that's a really valid point. Thank you. I like the idea that children have some responsibility for their behaviour and it's also a visual reminder of behaviour.

    There has to be some form of differentiation (wrong word, I know!) with behaviour though because for the children who consistently misbehave, I'd rather that they rewarded for small steps in the right direction but I wouldn't necessarily reward a well-behaved child for the same, if that makes sense.

    It must be hard to not have favourites though and I already have a few children on my watchlist :oops:
     
  19. markhorsey

    markhorsey New commenter

    Hello best advice I got was be firm but fair. Do not underestimate the ripple effect of praising someone for their behaviour rather than criticise a child for doing wrong thing.

    I’ve used litttle plastic trophies in last which can be used for anything from carpet time star... table super star.

    Praise is the way forward but do not be afraid to pull children up. It’s easier to go easy after few weeks than try and toughen up
     
  20. celago22

    celago22 Occasional commenter

    I agree. I plan to be fairly strict next week but make sure the children know that I also acknowledge good behaviour. I like the idea of plastic trophies. I am thinking of having a raffle ticket system. When a child goes above and beyond expectations, I can write their name on a post it note and put it in a jar. Every two weeks or so, pull a name out at random and that children gets a prize. What do you think of that? I still haven't thought about my actual behaviour management strategies yet so I welcome any advice and tips!
     

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