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Behaviour Management for beginners

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by almika, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. Hi,
    I have been volunteering in a school in India and at the end of last term the head teacher asked me to do some training with their teachers on behaviour management and teachers working collectively in a school.
    I have never done anything like this before! I have been teaching for 4 years and so have obviously attended training and have formulated my own style of behaviour management after listening to all the advice. The school I work in operates a fantastic system and so I have always strictly followed my schools sanction system.
    Apart from discussing what I have been trained to use and the system that my school uses i am really not sure where to start on this!!
    I have always found the TES to be a great place to start when I am a bit lost so I thought I'd post up here. Thanks in advance!

    Louise






     
  2. Hi,
    I have been volunteering in a school in India and at the end of last term the head teacher asked me to do some training with their teachers on behaviour management and teachers working collectively in a school.
    I have never done anything like this before! I have been teaching for 4 years and so have obviously attended training and have formulated my own style of behaviour management after listening to all the advice. The school I work in operates a fantastic system and so I have always strictly followed my schools sanction system.
    Apart from discussing what I have been trained to use and the system that my school uses i am really not sure where to start on this!!
    I have always found the TES to be a great place to start when I am a bit lost so I thought I'd post up here. Thanks in advance!

    Louise






     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Aye, we did a GREAT job getting back to you, didn't we? Sorry, sometimes these slip through.
    Well, you've already got half the answers: you teach people what worked for you, and what didn't. You share your best experiences and your worst, and use them as reflective points for everyone to consider.
    You then offer your thoughts on WHY you thought they worked/ didn't work, and what you could do better.
    Then you encourage other teachers to discuss what works for them, and why they think that is. Because there are two types of behaviour managements:
    1. Formal, structural approaches that probably apply to almost every kid; the idea, for example that kids are deterred by sanctions and encouraged by rewards. There should be a process, and a structure that everyone follows in order to establish classes and schools based on rule, not caprice.
    2. Informal, relational approaches. Everyone will have their own strengths they can play to, and while they don't always work from everyone, they might; I, for example, am very good at getting rowdy classes quiet with stories. But there are other things I struggle with. Avoid the temptation to make every teacher the same. Sharing best practise means reflecting on that practise and working out what works for the individual.
    You could arrange paired observations of teachers to see how other teachers work. That's a great way to get outside of your own classroom and see what you could be missing.
    Good luck, anyway
    Tom
    Read more from Tom here on his blog, or follow him.
     

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