1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Behaviour management advice needed ASAP please!!!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by blueberries, Jun 7, 2011.


  1. Am looking for some quick advice please, so I have a good day with the children tomorrow!!
    I am on my own ( reception) with no TA support. The children are being quite noisy at the moment e.g. Very hard to get them quiet for the register, some refuse to sit on the carpet for whole class time etc.
    Any suggestions for children who will not sit on the carpet quietly / not sit on the carpet atall - I have one little girl (A) who will not ever sit on the carpet sometimes ( she sits on a chair) and nothing I say or do will get her off it if she decides she needs to be on it. Have tried both rewards and punishments and she just does as she pleases!
    It seems to be turning into a whole class problem where children just won't listen. What can I do?
    Thanks so much for any advice :)
     

  2. Am looking for some quick advice please, so I have a good day with the children tomorrow!!
    I am on my own ( reception) with no TA support. The children are being quite noisy at the moment e.g. Very hard to get them quiet for the register, some refuse to sit on the carpet for whole class time etc.
    Any suggestions for children who will not sit on the carpet quietly / not sit on the carpet atall - I have one little girl (A) who will not ever sit on the carpet sometimes ( she sits on a chair) and nothing I say or do will get her off it if she decides she needs to be on it. Have tried both rewards and punishments and she just does as she pleases!
    It seems to be turning into a whole class problem where children just won't listen. What can I do?
    Thanks so much for any advice :)
     
  3. This is unhelpful to you (sorry) but just to sympathise and say that as a supply, I find EYFS very difficult for this exact reason. I'm really used to KS2 - and, so, shouting when I need to! I can't shout at babies! And I know this might sound stupid, but when Upper KS2s are misbehaving, they almost always know they're doing it, and meant to do it. With children that young, I wonder, 'well, do they know what they're doing?'. Last week I had a bit of time to kill after the story so I was going to play a quick game. This boy (of 3) stood up on the carpet and refused to sit down. I repeated the instruction several times, each time getting a bit more mock-stern and eyeballing him. So I told him I wanted to play a game but couldn't until he sat down. Thankfully, he cried, 'a game!' and threw himself back down on the carpet. But I was absolutely ******** myself because I had no idea what I was going to do if he carried on refusing! It's a nightmare!
     
  4. Just a quick one, in case it helps!
    Have you tried ignoring her and/or turning it into a game for the rest of the class? e.g.
    "everyone stand up, sit down, turn around, put your elbow on a chair, put your elbow on the floor, stand behind a chair, touch the window, sit on the floor"
    Obviously it could be a bit of a pain to have the children dashing about when you want to do an imput but they will hopefully (!) be listening for your instructions, getting rid of excess energy and then be in place when you finish and you can launch into the next thing. 'A' might get caught up and join in and leave the chair without realising.
    You might have already tried this or she might just ignore you and carry on sitting there but it's all I can come up with off the top of my head!

    If it's any consolation my class have been really chatty and unsettled this week, I seem unable to keep their attention for more than a few seconds and I am at my wits end about it too!

     
  5. Kartoshka

    Kartoshka Established commenter

    Do you absolutely need to read the register - could children self register instead as they come in? My tip would be to keep carpet time to a minimum, because the more you try to get them to sit and it doesn't work, the more children will get the idea that it's ok not to sit, and so it escalates. Do you have carpet squares or mats or something the children could sit on? Sometimes that can help, if they have their own special place to be. Lots of positive praise for children who are listening and sitting nicely - go wild with the stickers if that works as an incentive. Not sure if this is any help as you might be doing all this already! Wanted to try and suggest something, though. Good luck tomorrow!
     
  6. Waiguoren

    Waiguoren New commenter

    Hello Blueberries,
    No matter how old or young the children are they need consistent rules, and they should be capable of understanding that if they don't follow them there will be consequences.
    How about starting off the day by getting them all sitting quietly on the carpet and then explaining the rules to them. You said that it was very difficult to do this, but you only have to do it this once. It should be doable if you offer them a reward - say, for example, "We're going to play a really fun game, but we need everyone sitting over here." Then, when they are sitting down - and wait until they are all sitting quietly and looking at you - explain that when you give a signal (ring a bell, count to three, clap your hands, etc.) they are to come and sit on the carpet. Then practice that for a prize - have the children go to stand around, and then come to sit on th carpet at signal, for a reward.
    If you don't have a TA it's especially important that you have the children sitting quietly before you speak to them. Some drilling and roleplaying like this might be a good idea. Reinforce it by playing some fun games or reading books and insisting that the children sit on the carpet before you do.
     

Share This Page