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Behaviour in the primary sector

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by anon261, Mar 5, 2011.

  1. Hi
    I trained as a primary teacher in 2006 and spent just 1 year working part time before leaving teaching. I am now ready to try again - I loved teaching and knew i'd always want to come back into it at some point.
    I've got myself onto a RTT course which I start in a few weeks. Part of my problem before I left was behaviour management. I was told that, being a primary school teacher, I was too firm with the children.
    My question is this - what are good behaviour management techniques to use in the primary classroom?
    As much as I can't wait to get onto my course, I'm really worried about my behaviour management techniques and really need to get it right this time.

    Many Thanks
     
  2. Hi
    I trained as a primary teacher in 2006 and spent just 1 year working part time before leaving teaching. I am now ready to try again - I loved teaching and knew i'd always want to come back into it at some point.
    I've got myself onto a RTT course which I start in a few weeks. Part of my problem before I left was behaviour management. I was told that, being a primary school teacher, I was too firm with the children.
    My question is this - what are good behaviour management techniques to use in the primary classroom?
    As much as I can't wait to get onto my course, I'm really worried about my behaviour management techniques and really need to get it right this time.

    Many Thanks
     
  3. Depends on many things, mainly the age of the children and what their general behaviour is already like. (I teach in primary; Year 6)
    One whole school approach that works almost 100% in our school is a simple, age old idea of having a smiley face and unhappy face. Each class has the same printed faces and they are blu-tacked to the whiteboard. There's then a hierachy: on the smiley side...the name goes up, then one tally is a sticker, 2 tallies is a raffle ticket, 3 tallies is a praise note home, 4 tallies is a pupil award (which we do in our school) and 5 tallies is a letter home from the headteacher. The reason this works is because it's a whole school approach and each teacher makes a big deal of it....it's very hard to get past 3 tallies! Similarly, there's a hierachy on the unhappy side...name, then 1 tally they move place to sit on their own, 2 tallies is time out in a partner class, 3 tallies is referral to phase leader, 4 tallies is a visit to headteacher and 5 tallies is an afterschool detention.
    Another thing that works (and often requires spending a bit of money) is a weekly raffle. For instances of good work, showing manners, being kind etc, I hand out raffle tickets and then on a Friday afternoon, we draw a ticket and the winner gets to pick a prize from my 'hoard' (which is normally pound shop items that look cool!)
    However, the best thing I do, and has always, always worked is just to build up a very strong rapport with the class so that they don't actually want to misbehave. I teach in a very deprived council estate, with very challenging children and I know them inside out, upside down and back to front. And honestly, when you can ask how their baby brother is, or if they enjoyed the cinema at the weekend or if their mum is feeling any better; they truly appreciate it and know that you actually care about them. I have then found, that on the extremely rare occasions when my children do misbehave, they feel so guilty about it afterwards, that they actually find it hard to speak or look at me because they think they've let me down!!
    If you're fairly new to primary, it can take a while to find that balance between being firm with them and being there as a caring teacher (bearing in mind they are quite young!). When I first started, I firstly went to far being nice to them, so that they didn't listen to me when I needed to discipline them to then being far too strict so they didn't actually like me one bit!!
    Find what works for you and the children and go with it! Good luck.

     

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