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Behaviour - can I learn how to control it?

Discussion in 'NQTs and new teachers' started by jonewell, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. I am a TA with 6 years experience. I cover PPA and teach languages in my primary school. I gained my HLTA last summer. I cannot get a class to behave as well for me as their teacher. It is not very noticeable in KS1 but is in upper KS2. It isn't awful behaviour but the children do chat more even though I use the strategies I observe my colleagues using.

    I am currently studying my biology GCSE in order to apply to teach. I love working in a school and would love to step up. However, I suppose I am feeling that I don't want to jump through all the hoops / incur expense to find that, eventually you either have class control, or you don't.

    I do lunch duties as well as work as a TA when not covering classes too.

    Thoughts please!
     
  2. I am a TA with 6 years experience. I cover PPA and teach languages in my primary school. I gained my HLTA last summer. I cannot get a class to behave as well for me as their teacher. It is not very noticeable in KS1 but is in upper KS2. It isn't awful behaviour but the children do chat more even though I use the strategies I observe my colleagues using.

    I am currently studying my biology GCSE in order to apply to teach. I love working in a school and would love to step up. However, I suppose I am feeling that I don't want to jump through all the hoops / incur expense to find that, eventually you either have class control, or you don't.

    I do lunch duties as well as work as a TA when not covering classes too.

    Thoughts please!
     
  3. zoobiezoo

    zoobiezoo New commenter

    DONT worry about it, you may have tonnes of experience and you could be the best teacher in the world but to those children (ESPECIALLY ks2) you are not, and you are never going to be, their teacher. I spent all my training year trying to get silence from a very chatty class, and I spent the summer panicking about my new class for my NQT year as I had been warned that they were very tricky. Well its only been a few days but its been great! (could of course be honeymoon, we will see). I have been able to set my own expectations from the start: Calm, quiet, ALWAYS waiting for silence, etc and it is such a thrill to see them actually respond - immediately. Another member of staff took them for one lesson this afternoon and they came back with loads of warnings/sanctions that I haven't had to use yet.
    Please don't let it put you off - wait till you have your own class it WILL be different [​IMG]
     
  4. Behaviour management rarwely comes naturally to people. It is something to be worked at and there is no magic formula. You have to work at being consistent and fair, sticking to the school policies and getting support from others, such as the class teacher. BM is a team thing ultimately andteachers should work as teams to succeed. Remember also that there is classroom management as well as behaviour management and they are two separatethings, but linked. Classroom management encompasses whole classes as well as how the room is ordered laid out and arranged. Behaviour management is more about the individual or small group and that requires knowledge of the individual. both CM and BM can be learned.
    The Sage
     
  5. Sound advice above.
    Two thoughts. Firstly, don't discount the value of the relationship and understanding a class teacher has with their class. They should know those students very well and have established clear expectations about standards of behaviour. It is not at all surprising that another member of staff, without that hard won knowledge, cannot manage the students behaviour as effectively.
    Secondly, my experience is in secondary, but I would say that being a teacher, rather than a TA, gives you more intrinisic authority. Younger students (e.g. your KS1 students) my see any adult as an authority figure regardless of role, whether it be lunchtime supervisor or headteacher, but older students are more aware, and may well realise that you are not in their eyes a 'proper teacher'.
    The same thing happens regularly to trainee teachers and cover supervisors in secondary schools, the students know the ramifications for poor behaviour will be not be as serious, and so play up. They also more likely to test the boundaries. Especially as those boundaries will likely not have been so clearly established. I would not read too much into your success at behaviour management at this stage.
    Best of luck,
     
  6. Thank you!
    I have te support of my deputy head and with all your tips, things are looking more postuve!
     

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