1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Behaving like I am not there

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Cleg145, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. <font size="2">I am a secondary Music teacher, who has taught in London schools for 4 years. Most of my schools have been pretty tough and I have coped accordingly and felt like I have made a difference. I have also taught as a supply teacher, visiting many different schools across London. There are some good schools in London and not just in the affluent areas. I have heard too many people say that poverty excuses pupil&rsquo;s behaviour. I just don&rsquo;t buy it.</font>
    Currently I am teaching in a long term supply role, covering a Head of Music. At least 60 percent of my year 10 BTEC class couldn&rsquo;t give a damn that they chose Music, refuse to work and cause a lot of noise in lessons, disturbing those trying to work. KS3 classes are poorly disciplined throughout most of the school and so when I introduce rules to them in Music they look confused and some refuse to respond.
    Your responses please. Thank you.
     
  2. <font size="2">I am a secondary Music teacher, who has taught in London schools for 4 years. Most of my schools have been pretty tough and I have coped accordingly and felt like I have made a difference. I have also taught as a supply teacher, visiting many different schools across London. There are some good schools in London and not just in the affluent areas. I have heard too many people say that poverty excuses pupil&rsquo;s behaviour. I just don&rsquo;t buy it.</font>
    Currently I am teaching in a long term supply role, covering a Head of Music. At least 60 percent of my year 10 BTEC class couldn&rsquo;t give a damn that they chose Music, refuse to work and cause a lot of noise in lessons, disturbing those trying to work. KS3 classes are poorly disciplined throughout most of the school and so when I introduce rules to them in Music they look confused and some refuse to respond.
    Your responses please. Thank you.
     
  3. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    What do you do when you get to 1 and they're still ignoring you?
    If it's "nothing", I expect that explains why they treat you like you're not there.
    Your school will have a sanction system. You need to use it.
     
  4. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Absolutely not. Stick to the whole school system, but implement it as rigorously as you can- possibly more diligently than your colleagues. Praise those who do the right thing, and persist, persist, persist. What's the point of taking a teaching job unless you know you can live with yourself doing it? You should be planning to make things better, not merely survival, and I'm sure that with patience and tenacity, you'll make it.
    Countdowns etc only work if the students know there are consequences to ignoring you. So get your notebook out, take some names, and kick some ass- in a professional way, of course :) Sometimes they need to see some teeth before they back down.
    Good luck
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  5. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    Again, absolutely spot on. There's a system, so work it to your advantage. Don't give up.
     


  6. Lack of support from the school is half the problem. I am keeping pupils behind and giving detentions. The school is reviewing it's behaviour policy at the moment. Many staff complain that the current one is not being followed. That is a big part of the problem. I will do whatever I can to maintain the discipline and have correct behaviour in Music.
     
  7. Just remember that the severity of punishment is not as importaint as the certanty. Make sure that if you do give sanctions that you can and will follow through with them. Increase the amout of praise that you give to students that are doing as asked and expect good behaviour from you class. Sometimes just saying thank you to a student that is off task or not following instuctions will get them back to task.
     

Share This Page