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BC to IB

Discussion in 'International Baccalaureate' started by travellingteacher21, May 31, 2019.

  1. travellingteacher21

    travellingteacher21 New commenter

    Hi all, I'll be soon transitioning from British curriculum to an IB school after many years of teaching. My workplace will be starting me off with training in the course 'Making the PYP Happen'. Is there any advice from anyone else that's been in a similar position. What can I do to get a head start? What are the main challenges/differences? Thanks !
     
  2. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    Getting used to the PYP can take a good year or two (or three), and how easy the transition is can also come down to how well it is implemented in your new school. The main thing is not to worry too much about it, keep your eyes, ears and mind open, and go with the flow. Schools know that the PYP can take some getting used to.
    The other thing to bare in mind is that the PYP and MYP are quite different from their British equivalents, whereas the IB DP is not wildly different to A levels from a classroom teacher's perspective. Be aware of that when listening to / reading comments from teachers comparing the two systems.
     
  3. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    Welcome to how education should be. You will find a hell of a lot more freedom, but remember to bring you imagination with you, as that will be your only limiting factor.
     
    ToK-tastic and yasf like this.
  4. travellingteacher21

    travellingteacher21 New commenter


    How about in regards to lesson planning and activities? One thing i've loved about the BC is that it has been very well resourced online with great websites and ideas for planning, activities, lesson packs and so on. Would this be the same with the IB? Could the same units be used or is it a lot more complex than that. Is there, for example, a twinkle or planbee website where you could find assistance with IB lesson planning.
     
  5. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    No. The IB PYP is quite different to the BC.

    I sometimes compared it to cooking a meal. With the BC you use a lot of preprepared sauces, ready chopped vegetables, ready made pastry, frozen fish etc etc. There's also quite a strict recipe to follow.
    With the PYP, not only is everything made from scratch with fresh home grown vegetables, pastry/sauces that you've made yourself, fish that you went out and caught etc, ideally the students will have played an active - or even a leading - role in helping you do the cooking. You also make up the recipe in collaboration with your colleagues (and in some schools, the students.)
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
    mermy likes this.
  6. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    Not written a lesson plan in 12 years :). Im secondary, and they dont exist in the MYP
     
    yasf likes this.
  7. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    You will have written a unit plan though. Several of them.
     
  8. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    Yeh, and thats it.
     
  9. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    I'm shocked that you feel that you can teach effectively without the extra paperwork! ;)
     
    ToK-tastic likes this.
  10. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    Its not that i dont do my own planning,i just dont have to do the stupid, rediculous stuff that people teaching the British curriculum do just to "fill a box on a form or spreadsheet". I do actual planning that useful, not pointless
     
    yasf likes this.
  11. travellingteacher21

    travellingteacher21 New commenter

    Thanks for this. Really bring some clarity to the situation. But surely units of work and planning that follows this would have some assistance and or examples online, particularly for new IB teachers. I learn best through modelling so having access to examples would really help. Also, might be a silly question, but is the PYP curriculum independently made by each school or is it given by IB? I'm sure this will all be made clear when I sit the PYP course but would like a heads-up!
     
  12. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    Ask your school to send you some. They should also be able to send you a copy of the POI (Program of Inquiry, or what you might call an overview.)
    Yes, absolutely. Think independent restaurant that makes up its own menu, compared to a chain restaurant that has its menu imposed and frozen food / ingredients shipped in. The IB PYP label shows a consistency in terms of philosophy and approach to teaching and learning.
    Yes it will. When I did the course, the first part was dedicated to the philosophy of the IB (which should guide your planning and teaching), and then we made some unit plans up collaboratively.
     
  13. travellingteacher21

    travellingteacher21 New commenter

    So despite there technically being no lesson plans, it seems to me that the planning for the lessons and units of work would be alot more arduous and time consuming.
     
  14. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    Initially, yes - although you'll probably have a lot more non contact time than in a BC school. You'll find it quite frustrating at first, but most people wouldn't go back once they get into the swing of it..
     
  15. james_1979

    james_1979 New commenter

    Congratulations on your new professional journey. The positive, don't worry about it. If you're a half decent teacher and were trained well you will be fine. They will throw you buzz words like "conceptual understanding" and "inquiry questions". Which are nothing but a fancy way of saying, let's ask our students what, how and why. Throw in a where and when.

    Oh the IB... The curriculum who supposedly has a holistic approach to learning. Well their PYP "enhancements" came out in October 2018. Lord and be hold in this technology ridden world of ours....... I.T. should now be taught instead of it being just being a tool... Who would have thought??

    And wait for it, success criteria in lessons is apparently a good way to get the students thinking about their ability to learn and track the concept or topic you are teaching. In the old traditional language of the UK, US and Australia... The students will learn about.... The students will learn to....... Backward planning.... Taaahhhh-daaaaa! You should do that too apparently. What should our Grade 5 learn by Grade 5 in readiness for Grade 6.. Hmmmmmm.... Grade 4s...... It's 2018 and the IB just wrote this in.

    Your next question to your PYP Coordinator and HoPrimary is this.... "Can you send me the standards we are going to follow for language (reading and writing), math, science?"

    If they can't send you their scope and sequence WITH (emphasis the word WITH) the clear guide on which assessment format and set of standards you are using for language (reading and writing), math, science then be prepared for Grade 5s not being able to string a sentence together and having troubles with multiplying by 2, 5 and 4 at the very least despite being in the system for their whole primary years.

    What child or teenager doesn't need thinking skills, social skills, empathy, resilience, research skills the tick the box list goes on and on. Apparently only IB kids develop these... Don't forget the buzz word, "action". Why on earth a BC, US, NZ and AUS teacher would want their students to practically apply their learning outside of school..?

    I will be interested on how you go and what you make of it all.... Your best PYP schools use the standards of the old country including NZ, AUS, and the US.
     
    clovispoint likes this.
  16. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    @james_1979 the journey from a BC to a PYP school is quite different than from a US / Aus school to an IB PYP school.

    That said, your comments about how the school tackles literacy and maths is certainly valid.
     
  17. james_1979

    james_1979 New commenter

    Yes.. Who would have thought conceptual understanding and inquiry based learning could produce so many (fee paying) schools who can't get their basic reading, writing and arithmetic knowledge, skills, understanding and application in absolute order.

    One thing about the entire IB PYP and MYP programmes... Both conveniently release their "new" version of "enhancements" (PYP) and "Next Chapter" (MYP) a year later a certain country releases their updated national curriculum.
     
  18. dippit

    dippit New commenter

    Hi,
    I can't comment on the PYP or the MYP as I taught the IBDP, but you can adapt resources to suit your needs. Remember, they are your lessons after all!
    As for comments about there not being clear guidance, I kinda understand - but you are a trained teacher and know what the standards should be and what you're teaching towards...these things don't change, regardless of which curriculum you're teaching. I'm UK trained (not England), taught IB for 7 years, and moved a couple of years ago to A Level for the experience: the content doesn't change, just how you teach it.
    Also worth considering is the fact that universities will pick an IB candidate over an A Level one if that's all that distinguishes them.
    BTW, next move is back to IB - without a doubt!
     
    donnahcbc likes this.
  19. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    Teachers who ask for "content" in my opinion have no imagination, and no drive a teacher....just turn up, give me what im supposed to say, then i will leave.....a lot like the British curriculum. The IB gives uou so much freedom as a teacher, its really refreshing.
     
  20. yasf

    yasf Established commenter

    It's easier to 'teach'. You can just turn up, read through the relevant part of the textbook / show a video, do a few activities, then test kids on it a week later. If they fail, you just blame them saying they are lazy / stupid etc.

    The well-trodden path of the unqualified teacher.
     
    hope4thefuture and dumbbells66 like this.

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