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Basic Subject Knowledge

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by ks3003, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. What would you regard as essential knowledge/skills that all ICT teachers should possess?
    I am asking because that last two student teachers we have had have been disappointing - and that's putting it mildly with regards to the last one. Both had ICT degrees of some description.
     
  2. What would you regard as essential knowledge/skills that all ICT teachers should possess?
    I am asking because that last two student teachers we have had have been disappointing - and that's putting it mildly with regards to the last one. Both had ICT degrees of some description.
     
  3. "During the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) degree course we will help you get the European Computer Driving Licence qualification (ECDL)."
     
  4. define "ICT degree".



    I bet it's something including "for business" in the title and not a CS degree. But, to be fair, a CS degree is probably overkill for just teaching ICT (but useful for teaching computing)
     
  5. I find that graduates of web-orientated degrees are innumerate, don't understand databases or spreadsheets and can't even use a word-processor properly. As for programming skills......

    We give applicants a basic skills test including WP, Excel and Access.

    Scares a few of 'em off, though - not necessarily a bad thing.
     
  6. The last one did have a web-oriented degree. The student didn't know the difference between Computing and ICT - fair enough for the general public except as a prospective teacher I would have thought it was something that should have been researched. The student didn't know what a programming language was, didn't know how to put a page break in a Word document or bring an image to the front. The student only lasted 2 weeks - our students deserved better!
    The other one supposedly had a Computing Science degree so wanted to have a go at teaching a bit of the AS course. I suggested the computer architecture bit - fetch-execute cycle, etc. I watched the student teach 2 lessons before I said enough! I would have thought that knowing the difference between RAM and ROM was fairly basic knowledge but the student got it wrong.
     
  7. What on earth is a "web orientated degree" ?
    AFAICS anything that involves studying 'the web' at degree level should run out of steam fairly rapidly if you can't program, because so much of it is client/server and javascript stuff. Surely you can't to a 'degree' which is just web design only ?
     
  8. DEmsley

    DEmsley New commenter

    Words fail me... This is a Level 1 qualification with the extension it's Level 2. WHY are people allowed onto an ICT degree without something of this equivalence already?

    So much for words failing me [​IMG]
     
  9. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    I'd much prefer any teacher to know too much about their subject than to not know enough (or know 'just enough').
    ICT doesn't technically need any knowledge of computing/software engineering, but that's a bit like teaching English without any grammar - you don't necessarily understand the structure that underpins how it all fits together.
    Some of the year 11s in one of my classes called me a 'boff'...I think that's a compliment in this instance...(I'm a computing bore... :p )
     
  10. I sat at the back of a lesson where the student teacher insisted that photocopiers and fax machines were input devices, and CDs (note: CD,s not CD drives) were input/output devices, who thought that a lesson on computer security should be all about the data protection act, and who insisted that this was what "she'd always been taught".

    She has an ICT degree, I don't.
     
  11. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    I don't think subject knowledge on it's own in ICT can be defined - ICT in schools can cover so many massive areas, from Office stuff, to web design, to control, to multimedia, to programming,etc. As a basic cut off though, I'd expect all ICT teachers (especially student teachers) to be able to get 90%+ on a GCSE ICT paper and be able to create a reasonable multi-table relational database and a suitable complex spreadsheet model without breaking sweat. That's very simplistic though.
    More importantly, I would expect that any ICT teacher would be adaptable to be able to admit that they didn't know something and to find out how to do it reasonably quickly. There are many occassions (especially when looking at the tasks set by the board at A Level) that I've been left scratching my head, but I've always got there relatively quickly, either by trial and error or by digging around on Google.
    Maybe a better test then would be to set a candidate a very tricky task (perhaps something obsucre in a spreadsheet) but tell them before hand that they will be doing it, to see who is actually able to work it out?
     

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