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Bannerman High School Article

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by bigjimmy2, Oct 13, 2018.

  1. bigjimmy2

    bigjimmy2 Lead commenter

    https://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/news...r-hits-back-after-letter-called-kids-animals/

    I empathise totally with the teacher and their complaints. The HT is merely spouting the same old corporate bullsh_t you would expect from someone in that position. It would be interesting to see the school's Referrals record and the number of Incident Reports raised. At my school Incident Reports are certainly not encouraged but their use has certainly made alleged management do things a bit differently because of pressure put on them by their bosses at council HQ.

    Personally, since the summer holidays I have been told to "shut up!", "f_ck up!" and to "get to f_ck!", and that's only from my S5 class. We are, effectively, training such pupils that there's no consequences to such, dare I say it, "animalistic" behaviour, and therefore, any incentive to stop is simply non-existent, and so it continues.

    What do you think of the article, and what's it like in your school?
     
  2. GuessWho

    GuessWho Occasional commenter

    The school I work in is very much the same.
    There is no real or lasting consequence for not just "bad behaviour" or blatant refusal to attempt any work but also for use of abusive language towards staff.
    Exclusions are frowned upon.
    SMT have recently told PTs that it's really up to them to sort out behaviour problems within their departments and to avoid referring on!
    I feel like taking screen shots of one week's referrals and posting them online to show what it's really like.
    (Obviously I'm not daft enough to do that.....I hope!)
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
    Marisha and bigjimmy2 like this.
  3. sir2006

    sir2006 New commenter

    I have a friend who works in this school so it will be interesting to hear if his views are in any way similar.

    Personally, I work in a primary school and the reality is that, whilst behaviour on the whole is very good, there is a comparatively small number of pupils whose behaviour is very disruptive to their own learning and that of their peers’. I have seen firsthand the very significant impact this has on teachers’ mental wellbeing.

    I don’t know what it’s like in the secondary sector but it is very difficult to permanently exclude a child in a primary school - they would need to do something extremely serious I imagine before that line is taken.

    However, temporary 1-3 day exclusions allow some breathing space for both the child in question, their peers and of course their teacher. The excluded child would have work to complete in this time and both the child and his/her parents would be expected to sign paperwork to the effect that he/she will obey the school rules etc. The results? Mixed in my experience. It has worked for some children over the years - the shock of being put out of school for a day or more seems to have had the desired affect - their behaviour may not now be perfect - do we really expect that anyway? but at best, they can function and learn in a class with their peers without constantly disrupting lessons.

    In the case of those children where the above approach doesn’t have the desired effect, it seems that some children simply don’t have any sort of fear about the response of their parents/carers...often because the parents themselves lack the necessary parenting skills to address such issues as and when they arise. This is frustrating because some of our pupils come from very challenging family situations and whilst our staff try very hard to model appropriate behaviour and put supports in place, they are often battling against the wider problems affecting these children that teachers cannot address in isolation (and some would argue shouldn’t have to at all).

    Then there are those children who have conditions such as ADHD and the like, who, through no fault of their own, make teaching and learning extremely challenging for all concerned. In the ideal world, such children would be supported by additional staff members and integrated in the classroom whenever possible. However, given the significant shortage of teachers, that the Government doesn’t seem to acknowledge, and a push for inclusion at all costs it seems, this latter option is often merely a dream.

    Finally, there are those parents who would like their children to be labelled because then there will be a valid excuse for their behaviour. I see more and more children being diagnosed with such and such a condition, yet the person making the diagnosis has some obscure title from some obscure organisation...but it must be accurate because it’s typed on paper.

    Just my 2p worth.
     
    cassie511, Alice K and bigjimmy2 like this.
  4. sparkleghirl

    sparkleghirl Star commenter

    Interesting to see how the HT immediately turns the accusation on the teacher for the use of the word 'animals'.

    Also
    In other words, teachers who complain just aren't resilient enough

    Is that a higher than average proportion? It sounds pretty high to me but I might be out of touch.

    Aha, so that's it. HT looking to build reputation by reducing exclusions and keeping all the disrutive, threatening o violent wee sh!tes in class. As a consequence all the decent kids in the school are missing out
     
  5. Effinbankers

    Effinbankers Lead commenter

    Inclusion working well here. This could be written about many secondary schools across the country.

    Put mentalists/nutters/animals/feral weans (delete as appopriate) in a class and watch attainment go up? I don't think so.

    As teachers we're all asked to constantly back things up with evidence. Professional opinion or expertise counts for nowt. But where is the evidence inclusion works? Looked after weans seem to be particularly well protected/bulletproof and they're often the worst behaved of all.

    How are we preparing kids for life when they can do as they please in schools? If they go into employment (if they are lucky) and start abusing colleagues, firstly someone will give them a hiding and secondly they'll get their jotters.
     
    Marisha, cassie511, Alice K and 2 others like this.
  6. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    I think we've all called pupils "animals" at some point.
     
    Marisha, Effinbankers and bigjimmy2 like this.
  7. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    In some schools,this prepare them for life as "winning in life" type of people. Not every disruptive pupil will be the type to tell you to "f..off" in your face. "F..off" would at least be something you can describe on a referral report.
     
  8. beharder

    beharder Occasional commenter

    Disgruntled whistleblower describes it very well.
    Discipline is a thing of the past , SLT "exclusion is of the table"
    In the last 2 weeks Ive been subjected to "shut your puss ya fat baldy *******" " **** off before i squash you"
    " get your ******* hands off my desk"
    none of those animals were excluded.

    HT in article says the complainer should have gone to her what a ridiculous comment
    Excuse me Mrs your school is ***** ect.

    SLT want nothing to do with discipline its all about cover ups and nothing to see here.

    Now back to raising attainment.
     
  9. MilkyBar Kid

    MilkyBar Kid Occasional commenter

    500 ASN out of 1200 is probably higher than average, however the issue we all recognise is not the 500 but the 50/60 of those with serious, persistent challenging behaviour who clearly lost the right many moons ago to remain in a mainstream setting, yet will still be there causing havoc up until their 16th birthday or until they find a "positive destination", probably Bar-L in most cases. SMT, let alone LAs and the SG do not have a clue how to cope with such disruptive individuals. Off-site provision (approved schools anyone) as early as possible is the only way of securing a proper education for the vast majority of our young people who deserve better than what they are currently being exposed to.
     
  10. GuessWho

    GuessWho Occasional commenter

    "500 ASN out of 1200 is probably higher than average, however the issue we all recognise is not the 500 but the 50/60 of those with serious, persistent challenging behaviour who clearly lost the right many moons ago to remain in a mainstream setting, yet will still be there causing havoc up until their 16th birthday or until they find a "positive destination", probably Bar-L in most cases. SMT, let alone LAs and the SG do not have a clue how to cope with such disruptive individuals. Off-site provision (approved schools anyone) as early as possible is the only way of securing a proper education for the vast majority of our young people who deserve better than what they are currently being exposed to."

    COULDN'T HAVE PUT IT BETTER!!!!
     
    Alice K and bigjimmy2 like this.
  11. bigjimmy2

    bigjimmy2 Lead commenter

    Glasgow has 29 secondaries if I remember correctly.

    Excuse my language, but here goes anyway. One of those schools, a small one, could be turned into an "excluded" or "ned" school. If a Glasgow pupil behaves violently, either physically or psychologically, or is simply a constant disruption to lessons such that learning just cannot take place, then said pupil is sent to that school of a period of between one and four weeks.

    That may not be the panacea which we all crave but I am sure it would go a long, long way towards making our jobs a lot less stressful. Watch attainment rocket skywards too.
     
    Alice K, MilkyBar Kid and beharder like this.
  12. sir2006

    sir2006 New commenter

    Given that the teaching staff required to work in such a school would be on the same pay scale as everyone else, I think you might find it would be difficult to find suitable staff.
     
    Marisha, Alice K and catmother like this.
  13. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    It would take very dedicated staff members but on the plus side,it would probably involve very small classes and hardly any marking to take home. The curriculum would probably not be the same as in a mainstream school and would allow staff to vary from the norm as far as teaching.
     
    markbannan, Alice K and bigjimmy2 like this.
  14. sir2006

    sir2006 New commenter

    ...and it’s never going to happen.
     
  15. install

    install Star commenter

    Time for teachers to wear body cameras in some schools. Such is a world where the Gov't want less exclusions, where Ofsted judge teachers on the behaviour of students, where some head teachers and deputies are too scared to teach or challenge students,.and where some in society want.all encompassing 'child minders'; 'behaviour experts'; 'psychologists'; ' drug experts' and more ..

    So yes - bring in body cameras for teachers:cool:
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
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  16. bigjimmy2

    bigjimmy2 Lead commenter

    Something like every Glasgow teacher would be required to work there one year in ten, or something similar? Overstaff, small class sizes etc?
     
  17. bigjimmy2

    bigjimmy2 Lead commenter

    But it should.
     
    Alice K likes this.
  18. Effinbankers

    Effinbankers Lead commenter

    I've heard of some authorities where bringing a knife to school is not an "excludable" offence

    You can get lifted by the polis and put in the back of a meatwaggon, but be back in school the following day.

    The mind boggles
     
  19. install

    install Star commenter

    Agree. And its odd when a knife (weapon) in a school isn't reported to police - but a knife in the street is :eek:
     
    Marisha, Alice K and bigjimmy2 like this.
  20. MilkyBar Kid

    MilkyBar Kid Occasional commenter

    Some of you may remember a few years ago the Winterbourne View scandal uncovered by an undercover BBC journalist. There is a similar timebomb waiting to go off in Scottish Education when a plucky journalist posing as a Learning Assistant gets wired up with hidden cameras and exposes the true state of our schools and the abuse that teachers face every day. Now if we could time that documentary to be released at the same time that we're negotiating a pay rise...
     
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