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Baking powder problems...

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by Nellyfuf2, Jun 13, 2020.

  1. Nellyfuf2

    Nellyfuf2 Senior commenter

    I'm just faffing about with chickpea flour recipes, - tried my new baking powder (bought in 1 kilo pack off Ebay) and it has left me with a batch of baking that tastes rank. It seems like a baking powdery kind of taste. But maybe it is the chick pea flour? I'm too old for my cookies to fail the edible test. I was optimistically making chocolate fudge brownie too , which the internet promised me, would be fab, of the gluten free variety. Hence the chick pea flour.
    But when I used this baking powder in a chocolate mud pudding a few days ago, someone commented on the baking powder overtones, so I think this new baking powder is the problem. Should I add it to cream of tartar? It's all very technical this, isn't it?
     
  2. Nellyfuf2

    Nellyfuf2 Senior commenter

    Actually it does not taste that bad today. Maybe it is chick pea flour that has an aftertaste. Anyone got a good recipe for gluten free chocolate brownies
    No, wait, I've got the funny after taste again. Bicarbonate of soda at it's best.....
     
  3. lindenlea

    lindenlea Star commenter

    How many of these are you eating @Nellyfuf2 ?
     
  4. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    I think baking powder usually contains cream of tartar, doesn't it?

    I've never used chickpea flour other than in batters, like in pakoras, etc, so don't really know, sorry!

    If you're after gluten free cakes etc, there are some excellent ones that use ground almonds instead of flour. They can be really lovely, as well.

    Polenta/cornmeal is excellent in cakes, as well.
     
  5. Nellyfuf2

    Nellyfuf2 Senior commenter

    I thought baking powder contained cream of tartar but it doesn't - not the pot I have been using, which is standard. Dr Oetler or something like that. It contains E 450 Diphosphates and E500 which is sodium bicarbonate and Maize starch. Bi carbonate of Soda is just E500. Cream of Tartar, I read, is a slightly acidic thingy, that makes the bicarbonate do it's fizzy stuff and make bubbles. I am now deeply confused and bewildered. So what is in self raising flour? I have to go now, and check all the tiny writing on my groceries. As for the stuff I bought on Ebay, god knows what that is because there is no tiny writing. It comes from a place that does herbs and spices in bulk and just says baking powder on it. M
     
  6. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Self-raising flour just has baking powder added. If you've run out of SR you can just add baking powder to plain flour. I did just this the other day!
     
  7. Nellyfuf2

    Nellyfuf2 Senior commenter

  8. Nellyfuf2

    Nellyfuf2 Senior commenter

    Yes I have just looked it all up. Now I want to know, why there is not cream of tartar in baking powder or in self raising flour for that matter.... the foundations of my cooking are being undermined by Covid 19. ( I can't even boil an egg at the moment without strange outcomes.)
    I have lost the ability to make chelsea buns. This is quite serious. I may need to try again without the use of my bread machine. All sorts of strangeness came from my recent attempts to use strong flour in my normal recipe. It's not good this experimenting. I tried to make giant chocolate chip cookie in my slow cooker and made well, something with use in the building industry?
     
  9. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    We have tried a few chick pea flour recipes they tasted lovely, they rise beautifully although the colour was a lot darker compared to using almond flour, rice flour and or potato flours. On balance they are a hit, especially as it tends to be cheaper than others and can be used for savoury dishes as well. Mmmm makes me want to get cooking.
     
  10. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    It could be the same piece in which case it might have been mixed too well. Bicarb can clump, could that be the issue? Did you sieve it as you sprinkled nelly?
     
  11. lapinrose

    lapinrose Star commenter

    I've always used Bicarb and cream of tartar and was taught at college that was what baking powder was! first time I've heard of E 450 Diphosphates, but looked it up, here's the link.

    https://foodadditives.net/phosphates/sodium-acid-pyrophosphate/
     
  12. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    I imagine it used to have cream of tartar but then they switched to something else that's either cheaper, more stable or more effective. It's just to create an acid, when wet, to react with the bicarb, isn't it?
     
  13. lapinrose

    lapinrose Star commenter

    Yes, the reaction of acid and alkali produces CO2 which is a raising agent.
     

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