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Badly behaved class

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by modgepodge, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. modgepodge

    modgepodge Occasional commenter

    I'm on supply this week (except tomorrow) in the same Year 5 class all week, was in there on Friday last week too. They are known in the school as being the worst class, but in all honesty, compared to some other schools I've worked in they're not THAT bad. It's just continuous low level disruption - it takes forever to get them quiet, some of the boys are just incredibly disrespectful and have to be told over and over and over not to do basic things, like not fiddling with rulers when I'm talking. They regularly just start talking when I'm explaining things. I then have to stop to tell people to be quiet, at which point others start talking etc and it just takes forever to explain the activity which compounds the problem as they get bored.
    I give them one warning - they write their name on the board themselves. the next time, they lost 5 minutes of break. if I speak to them again, they go see the deputy at break/lunch and get in to more serious trouble. One boy who was rude and disrespectful on Friday and Monday spent Monday pm with the head and got a letter home. If he gets in to trouble again the head said he will exclude him. For one lesson today (Tues) he was amazing, then he returned to low level disruptive.I'm not sure what to do - I feel like I'm forever sending people to the deputy/head and I don't really want this boy to be excluded as it's not for anything major and it sounds so petty when I'm like "well, he was talking, and laughing, and....well, thats it really....."
    The school have been supportive, but I feel like I'm relying on SMT too much and should be able to handle this myself. I have been consistent and firm with them, setting expectations every morning etc, and regularly praise the ones who are behaving, and give out house points etc. I always follow up on threats (hense so many of them have been sent to the deputy!) I feel like I'm shouting all the time, I'm losing my voice and turning in to the sort of teacher I always said I wouldn't be :(
    Also, when the school asked me to do all week (on friday) I asked if I needed to plan. They said no it was all planned. All I was sent was very basic maths/literacy outlines and nothing for the afternoons. I have no idea what they are supposed to do each day, and have to ask the kids, and when I'm told "science on Tuesday", have no idea what to teach and have to make it up at short notice. As a result, I don't think I'm delivering great lessons which doesn't help the behaviour issues.
    I suppose on the plus side, they won't be "my class" after friday!
     
  2. modgepodge

    modgepodge Occasional commenter

    I'm on supply this week (except tomorrow) in the same Year 5 class all week, was in there on Friday last week too. They are known in the school as being the worst class, but in all honesty, compared to some other schools I've worked in they're not THAT bad. It's just continuous low level disruption - it takes forever to get them quiet, some of the boys are just incredibly disrespectful and have to be told over and over and over not to do basic things, like not fiddling with rulers when I'm talking. They regularly just start talking when I'm explaining things. I then have to stop to tell people to be quiet, at which point others start talking etc and it just takes forever to explain the activity which compounds the problem as they get bored.
    I give them one warning - they write their name on the board themselves. the next time, they lost 5 minutes of break. if I speak to them again, they go see the deputy at break/lunch and get in to more serious trouble. One boy who was rude and disrespectful on Friday and Monday spent Monday pm with the head and got a letter home. If he gets in to trouble again the head said he will exclude him. For one lesson today (Tues) he was amazing, then he returned to low level disruptive.I'm not sure what to do - I feel like I'm forever sending people to the deputy/head and I don't really want this boy to be excluded as it's not for anything major and it sounds so petty when I'm like "well, he was talking, and laughing, and....well, thats it really....."
    The school have been supportive, but I feel like I'm relying on SMT too much and should be able to handle this myself. I have been consistent and firm with them, setting expectations every morning etc, and regularly praise the ones who are behaving, and give out house points etc. I always follow up on threats (hense so many of them have been sent to the deputy!) I feel like I'm shouting all the time, I'm losing my voice and turning in to the sort of teacher I always said I wouldn't be :(
    Also, when the school asked me to do all week (on friday) I asked if I needed to plan. They said no it was all planned. All I was sent was very basic maths/literacy outlines and nothing for the afternoons. I have no idea what they are supposed to do each day, and have to ask the kids, and when I'm told "science on Tuesday", have no idea what to teach and have to make it up at short notice. As a result, I don't think I'm delivering great lessons which doesn't help the behaviour issues.
    I suppose on the plus side, they won't be "my class" after friday!
     
  3. crusell

    crusell New commenter

    Is fiddling with rulers such a bad thing, why do people expect 9 yr old boys to sit still all the time, a 9 yr old child is designed to move. Did you see the Gareth Malone's programme about the outside classroom
    http://youtu.be/pI9d9jW1ouc.
    If they want to fiddle get some of those 3d puzzle type things for them to play with while you're talking to them, also can I reccommend-Here's How to Reach Me; Matching Instruction to Personality Types in Your Classroom -Pauley, Bradley and Pauley
     
  4. modgepodge

    modgepodge Occasional commenter

    Because by fiddling I mean hitting each other, making stupid noises as they pretend they are guns, and using them as a lever to flick pencils across the room. I wouldn't mind if it was fiddling that meant they were still listening and not distracting others, but it's not.
    It's not my school, I'm not introducing that kind of stuff as a supply teacher. The concept I can understand, but at first it's going to be a massive novelty that I think will make the problem worse. Eventually it would serve it's purpose I expect but not in the 2 days I'm there.
     
  5. Mrs-Pip

    Mrs-Pip New commenter

    You are there for just two more days...set up a competition! Give out tokens for them to write their names on to go into a jazzy looking box. Tell them there WILL be prizes and remind them of this all the time. Whatever prizes you choose is up to you!
    Also...I would take the rulers away, underlining titles etc. will have to be put on hold if they cannot behave with them. You can always do this yourself when you are marking their books if you really care about it, or just leave a note explaining why some children haven't used rulers! Good luck!
     
  6. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    I must confess I did the same when I was nine. [​IMG]
    The difference was however I felt guitly when I was caught, wasn't rude and apologised and stopped doing it until the next day (or maybe the afternoon if caught in the morning)
     
  7. Don't beat yourself up too much as I think the majority of people find Year 6 harder than most other classes. Quite a few teachers have said to me a lot of supply teeachers do not do Year 6. They are the year group I do dread a bit and I find they press my buttons and get me much more worked up then any other. I seem to have much more patience with the younger ones.
    It's a tricky one as I must admit I do like children to be listening to me and I hate it when they are fiddling. However, I try and remind myself they are children and not to be too strict. Why don't you simply take the rulers off the tables and anything they could fiddle with away from them.
    I think you may be sending them to the head too soon and now it doesn't mean much to them. One warning, missed play and then to the head is very tight, normally there would be another step or two before sending them to the head. I usually do warning verbally, record name on board, move them, missed play then send out.
    Have a think about something you know they really enjoy/hate missing and use that as an incentive for them. In one school I know they love football practise and with the support of the teacher who runs the football after school club I use that as an incentive for them to behave. I often use golden time or free time as an incentive too, but I much admit this is a little hit and miss and doesn't work all the time. Some classes love rewards/free time etc, some don't give a damn.
     
  8. historygrump

    historygrump Senior commenter Forum guide

    As a secondary teacher, I am more then happy to teach year 6, I refuse to teach reception to year 2, they scare me.
    But I feel that the orginal poster is doing many things right, alhtough I would make it clear that if they misbehave they could lose most or all of their breaktime and evning some of their dinner time. Also I would move the rulers of the table and make it clear that they have them back, when they need them or when they can be trusted.
    But I feel that you are doing correct, in that you are following school rules in dealing with them.
     
  9. Hi, I know where you are coming from - been there many times myself! Just keep smiling and remember that its not personal, and its NOT you that is causing the disruption. There are a few things you can do about it though.
    Ive set up a supply teaching web page to support primary supply teachers here:

    www.beasupplyteacher.co.uk

    Take a look around, Im sure there may be some good advice you can use.

    Good luck, Darren.
     
  10. modgepodge

    modgepodge Occasional commenter

    Oh and it got even better today....
    The mother of one of the naughtiest boys came in today complaining that her son was upset he had been given warnings and kept in at break for something he didn't do. The conversation went a little like this:
    Her "He said he got told off for throwing something and he said someone else did it, not him."
    Me: "I can't remember the exact reason he was given warnings. I do apologise if he was told off wrongly, but I don't think he was. He was being quite disruptive. He also fiddled with the calculators in the box about 4 times after I'd asked him not to."
    Her: "He said someone pushed him in to the box."
    She then went on to say she realised he could "have his moments". I was thinking, yes, he can, and his moments are most of the time. Why do parents always believe their darling children - it's always someone else's fault isn't it? Especially when she is aware he can be naughty (he's had letters home from head etc). This boy is 10, he shouldn't need to blame other people for his silliness!
    He then spent most of literacy doing f*** all. Soon started working when I went over and said "So what are you going to tell your Mum this time - how are you going to blame someone else for the fact you've written nothing in a half hour session?" That worked.
    Sorry, just had to vent.
     
  11. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    Its seems to be the culture these days with both kids and some adults to blame someone (anyone) else for things they have done wrong themselves.
    Many people cannot acept responsibility for their own actions anymore. You rarely hear the expressions "I got that wrong" or "Its a fair cop gov" these days.
    The reason little Billy got grade F in his GCSEs is because its a **** school with **** teachers who cannot do their jobs. Not because little Billy never seemed to have a pen with him and when lent one he spent the entire lesson (and every lesson for the last 5 years) drawing male sexual organs in his book whilst listening to MC Puff Adder on his iPod. He must be right since his Mum agrees with him when she can be bothered to do anything.
     

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