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bad behaviour during interview

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by dddd1, Mar 27, 2019.

  1. dddd1

    dddd1 New commenter

    I recently had an interview with a badly behaving class. They were not terrible but borderline. Some walking around the room without asking or talking when I am talking. I talked to them individually to tell them not to walk without my permission. After a couple of times of verbal reminding, the offenders stopped. I also told the whole class that no-one should be talking when I am talking. I gave two warnings to someone who wasn't getting on with work but chatting the whole time. After the second warning, i told the observer that I'd given my second warning to that child and she muttered "you can have them removed if you want". It felt a bit awkward to have a child removed in an interview. I tried to handle the low level behaviour quietly as I didn't want to create a negative scene during an interview. In the end I didn't get the job because they taught my behaviour management wasn't strong enough.
    The school didn't give me any information about their behaviour policy before the lesson.

    i've had other interviews before and in all of them classes behaved reasonably well because there were SLT observing. But this time, kids didn't seem to care who was in the room.
    Does anyone have any advice on what to do with bad behaviour at an interview? Thank you very much
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  2. shamandalie

    shamandalie New commenter

    It tells you quite a lot about the type of school and the strength of SLT...
    If it was me, I would just apply the basic principles of behaviour management during the lesson and then leave the place without a second thought. (but I need a school where I can teach, not crowd manage all day).
     
  3. meggyd

    meggyd Senior commenter

    If they behave like that with SLT in the room..... Walk away fast.
     
  4. pwtin

    pwtin Senior commenter

    It sounds like you have had a lucky escape, count your blessings.
     
  5. becky70

    becky70 Occasional commenter

    If the children are happy to misbehave when SLT are in the room watching them then you are better off not getting a job at that school.
     
  6. JohnJCazorla

    JohnJCazorla Star commenter

    Is there a punchline to this?
    Did the only candidate to get a nice class also get the gig?
     
    dddd1, pepper5 and agathamorse like this.
  7. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    I agree, you escaped from what would have been a stressful place to work. Walking around the room without permission is a very BIG sign they aren't used to discipline nor following instructions. Be VERY thankful youndidnt get the job.
     
  8. dddd1

    dddd1 New commenter

    Thank you everyone for your replies. I had the same sentiment as all of you. I had lots of interviews before but never had to crowd manage during an interview before. Shouting at the kids for starters didn't feel right to me. I normally would crack down on that kind of behaviour but this time I want to do it quietly because it was an interview and I didn't know the kids, they didn't know me either. The feedback about my behaviour management not being strong made me think. I don't have a big voice and I am not the type who can pin the kids on their chairs by shouting loudly, so it was better that I didn't get the job.
    Also, you are right JohnJCazorla, there were two other candidates one of whom was a well-liked trainee at the school.

    Looking beyond the disappointment of it though, it was an eye opener for me because I never expected bad behaviour in an interview and didn't prepare for it. I wasn't sure how it would go down to use sanctions in that context as some schools ask the kids if they enjoyed your lesson or not and some schools may say "you didn't show signs of building positive relationship with the kids". It is sooo mind boggling, I am really fed up with the guessing game. Anyway, thank you all for your replies.
     
    JohnJCazorla, agathamorse and pepper5 like this.
  9. dddd1

    dddd1 New commenter

    Thank you everyone for your replies. I had the same sentiment as all of you. I had lots of interviews before but never had to crowd manage during an interview before. Shouting at the kids for starters didn't feel right to me. I normally would crack down on that kind of behaviour but this time I want to do it quietly because it was an interview and I didn't know the kids, they didn't know me either. The feedback about my behaviour management not being strong made me think. I don't have a big voice and I am not the type who can pin the kids on their chairs by shouting loudly, so it was better that I didn't get the job.
    Also, you are right JohnJCazorla, there were two other candidates one of whom was a well-liked trainee at the school.

    Looking beyond the disappointment of it though, it was an eye opener for me because I never expected bad behaviour in an interview and didn't prepare for it. I wasn't sure how it would go down to use sanctions in that context as some schools ask the kids if they enjoyed your lesson or not and some schools may say "you didn't show signs of building positive relationship with the kids". It is sooo mind boggling, I am really fed up with the guessing game. Anyway, thank you all for your replies.
     
    annascience2012 and agathamorse like this.
  10. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    Yes, as teachers, we are expected to ba able to manage a class well. HOWEVER, that does not include being able to instantly or magically be aging able to manage students who are used to getting out of their seats without permission, shouting out, disrupting, or not following instructions.

    Younare an EDUCATOR not a mob control expert.

    If you encounter behaviour like that in an interview don't take the job since the extreme behaviour will always be an issue in the school.

    SLT try to blame teachers for not being able to control feral classes/students; however, in most cases, it is SLT who have failed to take action and sort out the problems they are paid to manage.

    It is not difficult to create an atmosphere of excellent behaviour in schools, but many SLT fail to act.

    Never question your ability as a teacher because of the failings of others to act on the things they could have acted upon but did not.

    There is a serious and massive problem with poor behaviour in state schools and there has been for some years now ;and the problems is starting even to affect the schools which used to be decent places to work at.

    There are many people off with stress because of it and has ruined many people's professional lives.

    Don't be one of the statistics and put yourself first.
     
  11. dddd1

    dddd1 New commenter

    Very sounds advice pepper5. You're absolutely right. Thank you.
     
    pepper5 and agathamorse like this.
  12. tonymars

    tonymars Occasional commenter

    Ha ha. Happened to me once: an observation for a supply post in an academy. Got paid for the day though. You're well out of that one.
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  13. Skeoch

    Skeoch Lead commenter

    We scheduled one class for an interview lesson - forgot that there was the yeargroup's Number One Pain in it - had we remembered, we'd have chosen a different class. Candidate teacher nailed that Number One Pain in the first three minutes. Got the job (despite, or becasue of, our oversight). One of the best appointments I can remember, though I took a bit more care over selecting classes for interview after that, as I could see how this could have gone wrong......
     
  14. BYusuf

    BYusuf Occasional commenter TES Careers peer advisor

    Hi dddd1,

    I had a job interview where many of the students were badly behaved.

    What did not help was that I had been given class data for the wrong group! I could not believe it.

    A few of the students refused to comply and in the end, I sent one student to stand outside.

    It turned out that the class were taught by a number of different teachers, so it put their behaviour into context. With hindsight, I later saw that this and a series of other issues on the day, highlighted all the things that @pepper5 correctly outlined.

    The upside is that you now know that this can happen within interviews.

    If you ever experience a similar situation again, it will tell you a lot about the school and the role of SLT within it. Use that insight to walk away from / decline the role.
     
    pepper5, agathamorse and JohnJCazorla like this.
  15. Happygopolitely

    Happygopolitely Occasional commenter

    Why don't you walk out of the interview at the point of the continued bad behaviour and withdraw at that point?
     
    pepper5 and agathamorse like this.
  16. catslovelycats

    catslovelycats New commenter

    I had a terrible experience years ago. With 3 members of SLT at the back of the room the class were still unmanageable and I was not supported at all. I left at the end of the lesson. If it ever happened to me again now, I'd walk out mid-lesson and not even bother trying to get through it.
     
  17. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    As a supply teacher I have taught many badly behaved classes - hundreds of them over ten years but still am shocked when I read stories like catslovelycats.
     

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