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b squared?

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by sparklyrainbowfish, Feb 19, 2011.

  1. Hi all
    I'm applying for a job where I'd need to use b squared. I've never used it (or seen it before) but have looked at the website. It seems straightforward and a useful assessment tool - how do you get along with it? I'm not sure if it the paper or computer version that is used, but I suspect it would be the computer one. It's for use with autistic pupils, many of whom are non-verbal.
    Thanks,
    sparkly.
     
  2. Hi all
    I'm applying for a job where I'd need to use b squared. I've never used it (or seen it before) but have looked at the website. It seems straightforward and a useful assessment tool - how do you get along with it? I'm not sure if it the paper or computer version that is used, but I suspect it would be the computer one. It's for use with autistic pupils, many of whom are non-verbal.
    Thanks,
    sparkly.
     
  3. minnie me

    minnie me Lead commenter

    I don't use it but they do at my husband's school ( Special BESD ) and he does not rate it. I think that it is because the tool does not allow for anything but the teacher's interpretation of the student's ' progress' and does not lend itself to moderation / standardisation.
     
  4. We use bsquared, as ever there are pluses and minuses, it is mind numbing to complete but can be a useful tool for data and to show gaps that you need to address- but lots of progress on the charts depend on speech or eye contact which for some children with autism is impossible/very difficult.
     
  5. I agree with Midgey, it is very boring to complete. It does break down the P levels though which is really useful. As Midgey says progress seems to depend on speech. We focus more on the statements and less on the tick boxes (some of which are very obscure to say the least!)
     
  6. My biggest bugbear with it is that so many staff use the tick box descriptors as objectives and also don't think beyond them for other examples of how the child has fulfilled that particular P-level. Personally, I don't think it should be used at all for NC levels. It's time-consuming to complete but can be a useful tool if used correctly. It's very useful when used with CASPA to analyse the data.
     
  7. Thanks for your comments so far.
    It seems as if there are plusses and minuses, and if I get the job, I will bear that all mind.
    Thank you,
    sparkly
     
  8. we use it at my school. we are a special school and the SLD classes love it but I am in ASD and we do not rate it at all, we have just changed to the computerised version which we prefer as there is room to put in N/A which is helpful and it can be helpful to see where you are aiming to move the children on to which helps with IEP targets. To be honest though we only do it so we have something to show the LEA and put on the CASPA forms, the main assessment is just done through teachers observations as we have not found a good tool for assessing children with autism.
     
  9. RJR_38

    RJR_38 New commenter

    I use it within my unit (SEN unit within a mainstream school) where my children are high p-scales/ level 1. I used to use it as a 'tick sheet' but found I was just ticking stuff for the sake of it and not using the data constructively. Now I tend to use it more as a planning tool, I will look through each level and because I know what my children can roughly do I am able to see the areas they are lacking in and can make my planning aimed at these areas if needed. It is also a useful tool for IEP statements
     

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