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Average NCL in MFL at the end of KS3

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by Sol22, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. Sol22

    Sol22 New commenter

    Dear Joe

    What is the realistic Average NCL in MFL at the end of KS3? Any websites where I can check this?

    I would like to see the contrast between private and non private education. And what children normally achieve at the end of Year 8 if possible.

    Thank you
     
  2. Sol22

    Sol22 New commenter

    Dear Joe

    What is the realistic Average NCL in MFL at the end of KS3? Any websites where I can check this?

    I would like to see the contrast between private and non private education. And what children normally achieve at the end of Year 8 if possible.

    Thank you
     
  3. yasf

    yasf New commenter

    I know it's hearsay, but I'd put average expectations as:
    Weak student in a comp (non 5A*-C types):
    Y7: L2 Y8: L3 Y9: L4
    Good student in a comp (5A*-C types)
    Y7: L3 Y8: L4 Y9: L5
    Academic schools (95% to 100% 5A*-C type schools)
    Y7: L4 Y8: L5 Y9: L6
    Hope I haven't offended anyone, and would be interested if that matches reality.
     
  4. I would agree
     
  5. mpillette

    mpillette New commenter

    From Ofsted ('The changing landscape of languages - An evaluation of language learning 2004-2007'):
    <font size="3">It is relatively straightforward, with the right opportunities for learning, to enable the large majority of students to be working at Level 4 by the end of Year 7.</font> And this was as a time when primary languages were not at the same stage of development as they are at now.

     
  6. yasf

    yasf New commenter

    I agree, but
    is I think the key phrase.
    Is what is going on in primary useful enough to actually raise achievement?
     
  7. In 1998 60% achieved level 5 in mfl at the end of year 9 (nationally)
     
  8. Random175

    Random175 New commenter

    Number of hours taught probably comes under right learning opportunities. So do they expect level four if there are 3 hours of language lessons or 2 hours each week.
     
  9. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Bear in mind that teachers are awarding the levels and what one teacher will award a Level 5 for may be work that another would consider to be Level 3 or 4.
    I always had issues with a level being awarded for 'being able to operate ina range of tenses' when all the pupil was doing was including a few spoon-fed phrases in the past or future tenses. They couldn't even identify a range of tenses in their mother tongue!
    We were given a class set of written work (end of topic) to assess on the PGCE course and so many of my peer group awarded pupils a grade 4,5 or 6. My marks were more in the 2,3 and occasional 4 range because the pieces of work were so alike. The pupils hadn't written them; they'd cut 'n' pasted (often with poor spelling) teacher created sentences. I had started off with a grade 4 for the first piece I marked and then revised my judgement when I saw a virtual clone of the piece soon afterwards.
    In my NQT year, one school used a short test that came with the textbook for levelling Yr 9 pupils. It was marked by points awarded for each question and some pupils got the level for being able to operate in a range of tenses even when they got all the verb tenses wrong. they picked up enough marks from other aspects of their answers, often by lifting TL from other parts of the test paper.

     
  10. Sol22

    Sol22 New commenter

    Thanks for your answers guys.
    I really feel the same abotu the levels! It is great for kids to have this guidance but at the same time it is down to the way the teacher marks the work.
    I am thinking of a strategy to make the marking more lineal with all my teachers. Mayybe three accurate examples of each tense should bring the level. 3 examples of opinions and justifications for level 3 to be reflected in 4 with more grammar and writing, and 3 examples of good tenses to go up the level! For example, a good group should aim at 3 accurate past tenses using regular and irregular tenses and extending their sentences, adverbs, etc.. depending on ability.
    what do you think?
    I am very lucky because i have very good pupils and i can really stretch the top sets. the lower ability is keen but still receives the information.

     
  11. mpillette

    mpillette New commenter

    Because 'learning is messy' (I can't remember which pedagogue said it first) NC levels can never be a perfect assessment tool - & might disappear under the current cc review. This is why - under the NC - the levels are meant to be used neither scientifically nor in relation to individual tasks or topics. They are meant to be used on a 'best fit' basis in relation to work done by students over a period of time.

    From QCDA:
    - 'Effective periodic assessment (...) requires evidence from a wide range of contexts, for example observation of group work, class discussions, oral responses, class work, homework.'
    - 'Recording should be kept to a minimum &ndash; so that only what will be used is noted down &ndash; remembering that a great deal of valid assessment information is held in teachers&rsquo; heads.'

    Ofsted (2003) suggest departmental standardisation based a shared understanding of the features of progression. For reference purposes, some dpts build up a portfolio of pieces of work 'levelled' as a team.

    Some countries use multiple choice extensively in an attempt at assessing as scientifically as possible (no reliance on teachers' professional judgement), but not all learning can be assessed that way - hence risk of distorted teaching and learning.
     
  12. foroff2233

    foroff2233 New commenter

    Since nothing happens after end of KS3 with levels you can be very generous. Give all of them 7,8 or EP. Nobody ever questions ours. It's really as daft as that.
     
  13. spsmith45

    spsmith45 New commenter

    It does seem odd that schools spend so much time levelling and sub-levelling for it all to be abandoned in Y10. Largely a waste of time which could be used preparing good lesons and marking.
     
  14. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    Actually my last school had a straight correlation between the end of Y9 level and GCSE target grade. So much so that I ended up under-levelling pupils in order to boost residuals (not necessarily mine, anyone who'd end up teaching those kids)! [​IMG]
     
  15. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I realised that to my cost when covering another subject on supply, one which (like MFL) was not pursued in KS4 by the majority of pupils.
    I applied the NC levels conscientiously and realised too late that I'd have had 'evidence' for Threshold if I'd awarded them higher levels and been able to crow about Added Value under my tenure in the post!
     

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