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Author comparison work

Discussion in 'English' started by Danielle1988, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. I am trying to plan for my yr 5/6 class for the term. It is a new class and I have a few texts sets of Michael Morpurgo books. I thought of comparing Kensuke's Kingdom and Wreck of the Zanzibar. I havent read these texts so was wondering whether anyone can give me any opinions, Also has anyone ever purchased author study activities? It mentions comparison work in the set but I dont know whether it would be worth the money.
    If anyone else has covered this topic and used different authors please let me know. I am not certain on how to plan this topic. I could read 1 text and then read the other or I could dip in to both boos throughout the topic.
    Any advice would be greatly greatly appreciated
     
  2. I am trying to plan for my yr 5/6 class for the term. It is a new class and I have a few texts sets of Michael Morpurgo books. I thought of comparing Kensuke's Kingdom and Wreck of the Zanzibar. I havent read these texts so was wondering whether anyone can give me any opinions, Also has anyone ever purchased author study activities? It mentions comparison work in the set but I dont know whether it would be worth the money.
    If anyone else has covered this topic and used different authors please let me know. I am not certain on how to plan this topic. I could read 1 text and then read the other or I could dip in to both boos throughout the topic.
    Any advice would be greatly greatly appreciated
     
  3. My first step would be to read the books you're planning on teaching. I haven't read either of them myself, so that's the most constructive advice I can give.
     
  4. sunflower48

    sunflower48 New commenter

    I would do them separately otherwise your pupils may become confused with the plot, characters etc. Then I would do the comparison of the text as a separate unit. You may find that you have so much work that has been generated from each text that you don't get through the comparison bit!!
    Kensuke's Kingdom I think is a Year 6/7 transition unit, check that this is not being done with your feeder schools. I get annoyed with primary school teachers who only read texts with their pupils and then when I, as a secondary teacher, want to study the same text with them (not just read it to them) all I get is 'read this miss in primary school'!!!!! Unfortunately I have got full class sets of texts and do not have an endless budget to buy other books. This has happened with Private Peaceful, Holes and most recently one primary school reading (not studying) The Boy in Striped Pyjamas to a Year 4 class (which I find totally unbelievable!) Rant over!!

    Try looking on the Standards website as they often have sow for novels, and it also guides you to which texts are for each year group. I love Kensuke's Kingdom, a really good text to get your teeth into. In fact I think all of Morpurgo's books are excellent and very accessible for ks2/ks3 students.
     
  5. First year of teaching so unsure as to whether you get a choice for transition texts. Michael Morpurgo are really the only books that we have a full set of so it seems silly not to use them
     
  6. sunflower48

    sunflower48 New commenter

    How wonderful to have class sets of Morpurgo!!
    I would still check with your feeder schools about the transition unit. What usually happens is in the summer term before Y6 leave you read Kensuke's Kingdom and do a variety of activities with them. They continue studying this book in Y7 and do some more tasks related to the text. So it would be a shame to do this text now as you may be scrabbling around for a new one in the summer.
     
  7. manc

    manc New commenter

    I obviate this problem by doing books so ancient that no self-repecting primary teacher would be seen dead doing it.
     

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