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Assessment

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by Bacardi, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. Hi People,

    Hope things are going alright after the xmas break! Just wondering if anyone can give me advice on assessment in drama lessons at Key stage three. We have been told to use Kempe and Ashwell's levels for summative assessment and DOB for formative assessment I'm fine on that but what I want to know is WHAT is evidence? All I can think of is written evidence but then in an hour a week you need to remember drama is practical but is writing down on your plan 'X did hotseating, proposed a really well thought out question to ask of the character' enough evidence? Not sure what I'm supposed to write if I'm supposed to do it that way. Help!
     
  2. Hi People,

    Hope things are going alright after the xmas break! Just wondering if anyone can give me advice on assessment in drama lessons at Key stage three. We have been told to use Kempe and Ashwell's levels for summative assessment and DOB for formative assessment I'm fine on that but what I want to know is WHAT is evidence? All I can think of is written evidence but then in an hour a week you need to remember drama is practical but is writing down on your plan 'X did hotseating, proposed a really well thought out question to ask of the character' enough evidence? Not sure what I'm supposed to write if I'm supposed to do it that way. Help!
     
  3. Well, Bacardi, I haven't had any experience with these types of assessments (and being from the US, our definition may be a bit different), but I can offer a thought on assessing drama. Obviously, it's really tough, since it's not like you can assess on ability (totally not fair), but if you can set up some rubrics, I think that may be a helpful way to go. That way, all expectations are lined out and spelled out. Also, your students know exactly what you're looking for when they do their practical/interactive work, and anyone looking at/evaluating your class can see how you assess. Hope this helps a little!
     
  4. It might be helpful to get hold of a copy of Andy Kempe's 'Progression in Drama' (which is where the levels come from) and look at the section on assessment! Very useful. If you can't do that, e-mail me:
    gyp_queen@yahoo.co.uk
     
  5. Hi,

    Thanks for the advice both of you, I have looked at Kempe and Ashwell and this is what we are supposed to assess from but what I want to know is is just setting something up and you writing down 'the pupil did this, that and the other' enough or does it need to be documented in a more official way e.g writing or video?
     
  6. I am a new head of department, and I have also battled with this.

    Firstly, based on advice from the AQA GCSE moderation meetings, the feeling is that it is best to video as many lessons as possible from Year 7 onwards, so that students are used to the camera by Year 10 (as video evidence is now compulsory at GCSE for coursework). My department doesn't yet own a video camera with tripod (essential), so I settle for videoing work in progress once, and all final performances. it works out as videoing each class twice per module. This works well as students can then watch the evidence before they evaluate at the end of the module.

    Secondly, I use the Kempe model for assessment: Create, Perform, Evaluate (3 strands), so I assess how well students work in groups/pairs on research, then in rehearsal, then in pperformance.

    Thirdly, I have designed evaluation sheets (self, peer/group, and teacher) which mainly feature tick boxes, so students like them.

    All of this builds into evidence.

    Hope that helped!
     
  7. Sorry - forgot to say that I am then far more confident about giving levels, and students have started to value assessment far more as they know where they stand. Having student friendly level descriptors on display also helps.
     
  8. Hi Gipsy,

    Thank you for those suggestions! I was visualising hour upon hours of video tapes but good to know its only twice per module!! Put my mind at rest! Its good advice from the GCSE board! I have tried self evaluation sheets too and they seem to work pretty well but think they need to be implemented asap (e.g start of year seven) so students take them seriously (e.g not she was good cos shes my mate syndrome!), what do you think? Do you think doing a booklet of written work in a module is too much? e.g having maybe role-on the wall one lesson, ICT research for home work etc different written tasks in different lessons? How much written work is too much do you think in drama?
     
  9. Hi Gypsy,
    I teach at an international school which follows the Middle Years Programme of the International Baccalaureate. In any arts course our students are required to keep a developmental workbook to document their work. In drama, I have them do journal reflections, self and peer evaluations (using a rubric), writing in role, planning for presentations, research, costume designs, note taking on dramatic forms, or drama history, and more. I'm sure that you can come up with all sorts of ideas. I assess the work they do in their developmental workbooks but I also have them peer assess (again with a rubric) so that I do not have to mark everything. My students use their book every class and having done so since year 7 think nothing of it. I do point out to them that professionals take notes, plan, research and design. They also receive constructive criticism which they take on board in order to improve. My students like the idea that they are doing something that real actors, directors and producers do. If you would like some ideas for rubrics and some more information about the developmental workbook, email me at smerrick@acs-england.co.uk
     
  10. Hi, Bacardi, sorry for not replying sooner.

    I think that your ideas are sound, and my students all have a folder for writtn work (character development sheets, scripts, research, theatre history etc) from Year 7. I structure my modules like this:
    1. Creating: research into the era/topic, then presenting to the class, then writing a script if applicable.

    2. Performing: rehearsing work in progress and performing.

    3. Evaluating: group, peer and self evaluation at the end of the module.

    There is an assessment sheet which doubles as a record of work done which students work through at the start of each lesson, so by the end of the module, they are able to evaluate their work accurately.

    The answer to your question about written work is that there is a certain amount, but I try to keep it fairly low in year 7, and by year 9, students are following a mini-GCSE course (AQA) so that they know the demands of the course. This means that I do not get nearly so many students who think that Drama GCSE is a 'soft' option.
     
  11. Bacardi - just tried to send you the afore-mentioned assessment sheets, but your e-mail isn't working. If you want them, the e-mail me on:
    gyp_queen@yahoo.co.uk
     
  12. Hi Gipsy,

    Thank you for your reply. I am current;y trying to wrestle with assessment on my second placement so this is really good advice! I will sort out my email and get back to you as I think those sheets would be a really big help!Im trying my frist written assessment task with a yr 8 group tomorrow so fingers crossed! Thanks again B
     
  13. Hi Gypsy,

    Sorted out email - bacardibreezer46@hotmail.com it is now! Sorry about that! Could you email the sheets please? Thak you for your help! B
     
  14. Hi, I'm also having trouble with assessment at KS3. Any chance you could forward me a copy of any documentation you have? I would really, really appreciate it!

    email is bella_dub@yahoo.co.uk

    Thanks!
     
  15. I would urge anyone bothered about assessment in drama to take a look at my paper 'Bandwagons, Balderdash and Blather' which was published in National Drama's magazine 'Drama' in the Summer 2006 issue. The article reports on some research I did on the use of the Arts Council Levels. The bottom line is that we should be very suspicious of fitting pupils into blandly described Levels when we've got rather more important things to spend out time on in the education of children in drama.
    Andy Kempe
     
  16. Blime
    Thank goodness for those last thoughts in the post from Mr Kempe, my own feelings on assessment and 'data driven Afl' and the rest of it ..far too much time spent assessing and writing leads to less time spent on the process and the stimulus, acquiring the group skills and imagination,learning to be self directed..etcetc.
    Too much focus on the assessment criteria by the teacher means less open ended exploration.

    I do assessments and provide peer and self evaluation time at the end of each mini- task, a few minutes; a little bit of writing ( usually as a pie chart exercise) and some homeworks.At the end of a module or unit an assessment which leads to a modified GCSE type grade and % recorded in their plannner.
    We only have an hour a week in KS3 and in year 8 an hour a fortnight!!
     
  17. Blimey, this is a post blast from the past!!!
     
  18. Conrad81

    Conrad81 New commenter

    anyone know where I can get 'Bandwagons, Balderdash and Blather' online?
     
  19. PM me nicely.
     

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