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Aspergers in Reception

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by jessicarabbit, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. Hello
    I am looking for some advice, will be posting this in SEN forum too.

    I have a boy in my class with Aspergers (v recent diagnosis) who has, rather worryingly, in the last 2 months started to be very physical with other children in the class - hitting, kicking, pushing. This is mostly completely unprovoked.
    I have been advised to use social stories with him to help him understand what is socially acceptable and how to be kind, but this is slow work with little progress!
    I am getting worried as there are usually incidents of him being physical like this several times a day. He is now being supervised by an adult at playtimes. Interestingly the vast majority of these incidents are at lunchtime play, he is usually much better the rest of the day.
    Does anyone have any advice for other tactics that I can use to try and get him to stop hitting. I am worried that soon none of the other children will like him and he will be realy isolated from the class. Simply telling him not to do it gets me nowhere and missing his playtime and other such punishments have little effect.

    Any advice greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Hello
    I am looking for some advice, will be posting this in SEN forum too.

    I have a boy in my class with Aspergers (v recent diagnosis) who has, rather worryingly, in the last 2 months started to be very physical with other children in the class - hitting, kicking, pushing. This is mostly completely unprovoked.
    I have been advised to use social stories with him to help him understand what is socially acceptable and how to be kind, but this is slow work with little progress!
    I am getting worried as there are usually incidents of him being physical like this several times a day. He is now being supervised by an adult at playtimes. Interestingly the vast majority of these incidents are at lunchtime play, he is usually much better the rest of the day.
    Does anyone have any advice for other tactics that I can use to try and get him to stop hitting. I am worried that soon none of the other children will like him and he will be realy isolated from the class. Simply telling him not to do it gets me nowhere and missing his playtime and other such punishments have little effect.

    Any advice greatly appreciated.
     
  3. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    lunchtime can be a long time for any reception child (let alone one with SEN) to cope with if the lunchtime supervisors arn't tuned in or if there are ia a lack of play equipment.I had to take my children (reception) out of lunchtime and appoint year 6 'playworkers' to play withthem in their own area for a term and a half.They now play with the rest of the class but still some of my boys,hit and thump some of the older children??? Apart from being out in the playground myself I am at a loss again ...the children need to be engaged with games ,balls,skipping ropes etc
    If the child has a helper at lunchtime could they play with a small group of children away from the hum drum? Could the child come inside for a quiet time with story or something to calm them down..the social story could be re enforced at this time
    Our year 6 boy with aspergers finds it very difficult to play with other children and he does need lots of help in understanding situations as he is unable to 'read' situations
     
  4. katycustard

    katycustard New commenter

    Jessica, you have a little boy with a diagnosis that means he is not 100% responsible for his behaviour. He will need a lot of help as he moves through school, but missing playtime and other such punishments doesn't usually help children with AS. I feel it's like punishing a visually impaired child for bumping into things!
    Children with AS usually respond well to rules, although one of the difficulties of children with AS or on the ASD is that they are all so different! Some children find structure and routine very helpful and playtimes are usually the opposite of this. The fact lunchtime play is bad seems to indicate this too. Can the adult who is with him help him find things to do that don't involve other children, using a magnifying glass to see what he can find, finding 10 things that are bigger than his hand etc. Sometimes we try and fit square pegs into round holes, when we might be better letting them be square pegs alongside round holes, not squashed in them!
    Young children are often quite accepting of other children's behaviour, especially if they know that some children find 'being good' difficult.
    Giving him alternative strategies to hitting out will take time, but is worth it in the long run. So telling him, and showing him with pictures/photos, that when he feels angry/sad/scared he can't hit/kick/push but he can move away/find an adult/look at a book (for example) might be time consuming but should help.
    I hope you are getting the support you need from your SENCO, but please remember it is very easy to label a child with difficulties as naughty, and less easy to loose that label! (I don't mean to come across as judgemental, but this is something I feel very strongly about!)
     
  5. katycustard

    katycustard New commenter

    We posted more or less at the same time! I think this is a lovely thing to do and how kind of you to set it up.
     
  6. Thanks both of you for your swift responses!

    Some very useful advice there. I am very aware that he is not being naughty and tell everyone in the school this! Hard to make some people understand. My senco is a bit clueless if I'm totally honest so not much help coming from that direction. I agree with what you say about the reasons for lunchtime being a trigger point.
    Am making notes! Thanks again.

     
  7. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    we had a little aspergers boy in school until year3 where he then moved to a school that had an autistic unit as the KS2 curriculum ,small (victorian)classrooms were just not right for him.The children in school were brilliant with him and his 'outbursts'.
    Ask your LEA for help there must be trained people there..do you have special schools in your authority?the staff there will be very helpful if you ask for advice.
     
  8. katycustard

    katycustard New commenter


    It can be hard, but keep perservering! One of the national autism societies has some good advice for teachers, parents etc. I think it's Autism Uk, but am not sure. [​IMG]
     

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