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asperger syndrome??

Discussion in 'Primary' started by s0700452, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. I feel out of my depth at the moment. Started teaching a year 3 class and one child has aspergers. He gets easily frustrated and calls out all the time. When I give him work he says he has finished 5 minutes later, the quality is quite poor and as it took it such a short amount of time I am sure its not his best effort. I gave him some work yesterday and he said 'but that'll take forever' then started banging his head on the table. When colouring in he just uses one colour and scribbles. I asked him to look closely at all the different colours in the original piece of work he was looking at and he screamed at me saying he was trying. Someone please help how I can get the best out of this boy without him getting angry.
     
  2. I feel out of my depth at the moment. Started teaching a year 3 class and one child has aspergers. He gets easily frustrated and calls out all the time. When I give him work he says he has finished 5 minutes later, the quality is quite poor and as it took it such a short amount of time I am sure its not his best effort. I gave him some work yesterday and he said 'but that'll take forever' then started banging his head on the table. When colouring in he just uses one colour and scribbles. I asked him to look closely at all the different colours in the original piece of work he was looking at and he screamed at me saying he was trying. Someone please help how I can get the best out of this boy without him getting angry.
     
  3. what about setting him up a personal schedule? Setting him shorter tasks which will be easier for him to complete maybe tasks that only take him about 5-10 minutes to do?
     
  4. bigbev

    bigbev New commenter

    I have been involved with several children with Autism Spectrum issues. I have been advised in the last year to make social stories for these children for 'situations' in the classroom/school day. Make sure they have a work station with a visual timetable stick to it. Give them a tray with 'activities' to do once they have finished so they dont demand your attention all the time. For angry time agree a place in the room they can go to calm down.
    The young man I had last year was year 4 - We always had a bad week when he came back to school after holidays especially. He became increasingly distracted toward the end of term as he knew changing class/teacher was getting closer. When I was able I would meet him before school and just spend time with his social story sharing expectations of the school day. This did help him.
    The parting words from my last years young man was he wanted to show me he could change - I had to walk away as reduced me to tears - I knew I had made a difference! -
    Keep going - Children who have Autism type issues often struggle with change and need time to adjust to a new teacher.Children like this are often the most rewarding in the end.
    PS - Have you looked at Autism Association website as there are lots of great ideas on there.
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    and not giving him colouring
     
  6. peppermint25

    peppermint25 New commenter

    I have a child in my class with similar behaviours. I find a visual timetable with pictures works well, as well as short tasks that are achievable. Attached to his table I have a learning chart broken up throughout the day. In the morning he chooses what play activity he would like to work towards that day. So say he picks lego, he puts a picture of lego on to the top of his chart for that day, his 'goal'. He must then get three smiley face for completing three pieces of work in the morning (he draws a smiley face for each piece of completed work), then he gets 5/ 10 mins with the lego. Then after break, three pieces of work, then after lunch three pieces. This really works for him as he needs the incentive and to visually see that he is getting closer to his 'goal'.
     
  7. This is all perfectly normal behaviour for a child with aspergers.
    As others have said the beginning of the year is very difficult as he settles into a completely new routine. Each monday will also be a challenge although these will get easier and the beginning of each term and half term. I definitely advise meeting with him before the day begins to get him settled and stick to a clear routine. keep the days as much the same for him as possible and pre warn him of any changes - good or bad. These children do not like surprises.
    Check with his previous teacher and his parents about any personal likes or dislikes. I taught a year 6 child with aspergers a few years ago and found that by being aware of things saved alot of stress for both of us.
    Check if he is entitled to any one to one support - if he has a definite diagnonsis he should have some time.
    Good luck - i'm sure you will find it really rewarding.
     
  8. I had a boy with AS last year and have another little boy again this year. Last year the boy often refused to do tasks, or write on both sides of a page, or join in if we were not doing something he wanted. The main issue, however, was his pretending, which he did all the time, so neither the children or I knew when he was telling something real and when he was pretending.
    I created a social story around his pretending and he looked at this on a weekly basis, which worked well. I was also firm and calm with my expectations. I found out what he really enjoyed doing (wake up shake up) and he then had a reward card where he got a sticker for each session where he followed my instructions. Once he had ten stickers he got to choose the wake up shake up song and lead the session if he wished to. This worked really well and he eventually didn't need it. I have to say it took a lot of being consistent and calm to get to that though and reminding him on a daily basis 'remember when you are allowed to pretend' etc.
    I have to say having a diagnosis doesn't seem to give him any significant one to one time in my shcool as he is only School Action, but I would imagine that depends on the severity.
    I am also experiencing similar issues with my new little boy and will be chatting to him and his mum to find out his likes/dislikes etc to be able to set up a system for him.
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    A diagnosis definitely doesn't guarantee a statement or additional support. You need to remember every child with the label AS is very different. My AS son wouldn't be at all interested in rewards or sanctions I'm afraid. Does your LEA have an ASD support team you can ask to observe and provide ideas how best to proceed?
     
  10. Yes, I have had three boys with AS so far and they were all very different. I think the initial tricky bit is finding out what makes them tick, as I encountered some alarming reactions to things I didn't realise or predict would be problems. Once he knew me and I knew him though, and he knew I was really consistent with what I expected, it was so much better and enjoyable all round.
     
  11. Thank you so much for all your help. Guess it will be easier once i get to know him. I am hoping that next week will be eeasier because we will have more of a routine. Last week the children were only in on thurs and fri so we have not really started our numeracy or literacy yet. Does anyone have any books they recommend that I can read?
    Thanks again for your help.
     
  12. bigbev

    bigbev New commenter

    http://www.autism.org.uk/working-with/education/educational-professionals-in-schools.aspx
    I suggest strongly you start here before spending money on books - also as someone else suggested see if you have an LEA Autism Outreach team.
    I had a behaviour support worker come in and observe last year - she was amazing - she will continue with the child this year as well - helping with 'circle of friends' work.
    Every child is different and you just need to get to know him...it takes time...I had awful days last year where the child attacked others, different day the child lost it big time and ran on the tables round the class room...another day I have had work eaten...work has been thrown at me....but equally I have had wonderful days
     

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