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Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by Its, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. Its

    Its New commenter

    Our Catholic Priest, Fr Eddie Murphy, was killed in a road crash last Friday. We are devastated. A year ago our Bishop Michael finally died of the cancer which had been his faithful companion for seven long years. He kept working through it. Our last priest came from India where they have training colleges for 200 people at a time. He was excellent, he took a fresh look at everything and did a lot of good. He was in his 60s. The one before was blind, wore slippers on his swollen feet and was over 70 years old when he finally retired.
    Meanwhile, over here, we read of vast numbers of civil service people being laid off. We hear of vast numbers of youth unemployed, especially University people. We hear of teachers who have simply had enough of school life and do not know what else to do with their lives.

    We are desperately short of priests in this country. There simply aren't enough in the pipeline. But in the rest of the world, the Catholic Church is thriving. In Singapore recently, I went to Mass in a Church that was, for about the third time that day, packed with worshippers. There were five priests. This was just a suburban parish. In Dubai, a huge Church with a different congregation of over a thousand people regularly attends Mass every hour on Sundays. The secondary school next door is as big as any of our comprehensives and seems to have enthusiastic and well behaved pupils too. There is sport and the behaviour and dedication of the students simply amazing.
    I could go on.
    So does this ring any bells? There are a lot of misconcenceptions about the Catholic priesthood. I would be really pleased to see if anyone out there is interested in finding out more. At a time of mass unemployment, we have, in other words, a lot of vacancies and very few takers for one of the most rewarding ways of life in the UK.
    PS ­In no way am I representing anyone except myself. But I can plug you into the right socket if you like. stallard495@btinternet.com
     
  2. Its

    Its New commenter

    Our Catholic Priest, Fr Eddie Murphy, was killed in a road crash last Friday. We are devastated. A year ago our Bishop Michael finally died of the cancer which had been his faithful companion for seven long years. He kept working through it. Our last priest came from India where they have training colleges for 200 people at a time. He was excellent, he took a fresh look at everything and did a lot of good. He was in his 60s. The one before was blind, wore slippers on his swollen feet and was over 70 years old when he finally retired.
    Meanwhile, over here, we read of vast numbers of civil service people being laid off. We hear of vast numbers of youth unemployed, especially University people. We hear of teachers who have simply had enough of school life and do not know what else to do with their lives.

    We are desperately short of priests in this country. There simply aren't enough in the pipeline. But in the rest of the world, the Catholic Church is thriving. In Singapore recently, I went to Mass in a Church that was, for about the third time that day, packed with worshippers. There were five priests. This was just a suburban parish. In Dubai, a huge Church with a different congregation of over a thousand people regularly attends Mass every hour on Sundays. The secondary school next door is as big as any of our comprehensives and seems to have enthusiastic and well behaved pupils too. There is sport and the behaviour and dedication of the students simply amazing.
    I could go on.
    So does this ring any bells? There are a lot of misconcenceptions about the Catholic priesthood. I would be really pleased to see if anyone out there is interested in finding out more. At a time of mass unemployment, we have, in other words, a lot of vacancies and very few takers for one of the most rewarding ways of life in the UK.
    PS ­In no way am I representing anyone except myself. But I can plug you into the right socket if you like. stallard495@btinternet.com
     
  3. Gardening Leaves

    Gardening Leaves New commenter

    Just when we thought it couldn't get any worse...

    As Professor Brian Cox says: 'Nobber!'

    :)
     
  4. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    <h1></h1>Spain's Catholic Church has launched a recruitment drive to attract young men into the priesthood as the nation struggles with soaring unemployment.
    While many organisations are laying off workers in crisis-hit Spain, one in particular is still keen to hire.
    The Roman Catholic Church is hoping that they can tempt young men to join the priesthood to reverse a trend that has left many parishes across Spain without a priest.
    A new campaign launched this week by Spain's Episcopal Conference promises a secure job with a modest salary that offers eternal rewards.
    "I do not promise you a great salary. I promise you a permanent job," states one of nine priests who appear in the two-and-a-half minute clip broadcast on YouTube ahead of Dia del Seminario &ndash; Day of the Priest &ndash; on March 19.
    Another says: "I do not promise you will live a luxurious life. I promise your wealth will be eternal."
    (Quoted from today's Telegraph)
    Trouble is . . . trouble is that the Catholic Church is not an Equal Opportunities employer. Don't think MiddleMarch, Serendipity or LilyOfTheField would get a look in.
    Nor Curlygirl. [​IMG]
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The next seminar Win That Teaching Job is Saturday 24th March. www.tesweekendworkshop95.eventbrite.com
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk
     
  5. Its

    Its New commenter

    Actually it was the Spanish example that encouraged me to post the article.
    I take your point about not being an Equal Opportunities Employer. I can assure you that it is rather poor at Ofsted Inspections, asking for correct personal details and insisting on not smoking and drinking. I regret that it is not really political and there is no Trades Union for members. Our rules are far, far stricter than that.
    On the other hand, it does do a lot of very good, unusual work (we were the first to face up to the wave of immigrants in our town and we are still in the lead). And we do face up to basics - birth, the good life and death.
    The facts remain: there is a real job of work to be done, not only here in UK, but also abroad. Real men and women (we do have female religious too, remember) can rise to the challenge.
    Above all, it is fun.
     

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