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Are these books worthwhile...?

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by anon1717, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. Hello everyone,
    I have just completed my PGCE and not secured a post, so I'll be doing supply work for the forseeable future. Considering how organised I like to be, this is understandably leaving me feeling very nervous and apprehensive, so if I can make my life a little easier I will do.
    I found this (and the other books in the series) on Amazon and am wondering if anyone else here has used them. Are they worthwhile? I know it's better to have your own stuff on hand, but there may be times when I'm struggling for ideas, have already used my favourite lessons in the school (as I do not drive, I will probably find myself doing work in the same schools quite often) or just have to pull something out of a hat, pronto.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1408111578/ref=s9_simh_gw_p14_d0_i3?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0SETWNE5ZDKBFBAVKHZ9&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=247518427&pf_rd_i=468294
    As a starting supply teacher, what book/books should I have? I don't want to overload with things, especially as I hope the situation is merely temporary, but it's going to be stressful enough so the more help, the better :) And such books may prove useful for last-minute ideas too.
    Thanks!

     
  2. Hello everyone,
    I have just completed my PGCE and not secured a post, so I'll be doing supply work for the forseeable future. Considering how organised I like to be, this is understandably leaving me feeling very nervous and apprehensive, so if I can make my life a little easier I will do.
    I found this (and the other books in the series) on Amazon and am wondering if anyone else here has used them. Are they worthwhile? I know it's better to have your own stuff on hand, but there may be times when I'm struggling for ideas, have already used my favourite lessons in the school (as I do not drive, I will probably find myself doing work in the same schools quite often) or just have to pull something out of a hat, pronto.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1408111578/ref=s9_simh_gw_p14_d0_i3?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0SETWNE5ZDKBFBAVKHZ9&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=247518427&pf_rd_i=468294
    As a starting supply teacher, what book/books should I have? I don't want to overload with things, especially as I hope the situation is merely temporary, but it's going to be stressful enough so the more help, the better :) And such books may prove useful for last-minute ideas too.
    Thanks!

     
  3. Most supply teachers have different things they feel happy having with them. I think it's best if you have Literacy and Numeracy stuff for both KS and Science and Craft for each KS. I like to feel completely prepared so I have a File box with Worksheets in across all topics of Lit and Num from Nursery to Year 6, Science relevent sheets, Geography, History, Music, Art and MFL worksheets for all year groups and a couple of books with paper/crafting ideas. I mainly keep them in the back of my car and only take in a Lit book and Num book relevant to the year I've been told, a science book and Craft, It's usually the non curricular in the afternoon so if I find out I need a resource for something specific I can nip out at lunch and see if I have it in my car.
    A lot of supplys I've come across dont have anything except paper and if resources arent left then just make up lessons. I did the same thing yesterday in a school I was in as there was no time to look through and photocopy, but that comes with experience really.
    I've babbled a bit but honestly get a couple of basics then do it for a while and see what you 'acquire' over a few months.
     
  4. If you are starting supply then the first thing, before anything else is navigation and route planning.
    For the first trip to a school, It must be right! and on time and probably early.
    I am secondary. Lesson starts and lesson endings. For me the ending of a lesson is the litmus test for my performence.
    In secondary, The starter settling activity has to be simple, without loads of talking as you will need to learn to grind them down as the lesson progresses.
    The best book about teaching is 'The Craft of the Classroom', by Michael Marland. Meant for any teacher. However he clearly puts much emphasis on the starter. He says, it does not matter what it is, but it must be quickly communicated, meaning no long lectures at the start.
    I noticed on the original post it mentioned plucking good lessons from previous teaching. Now that is the right way to think.
    I call it my Flagship Lessons, one of the great things in secondary supply is the possibility to negotiate with the HOD of your subject to do a particularly good lesson you know will work because you did it previously.
    However always keep to the guidelines of the classroom teacher if no negotiation is available.
    Endings, always clear up early and dismiss a class as if you are in charge, not them
     
  5. That's some great advice from both of you: unfortunately, I can't cart around a box of tricks as I don't drive, but I can have a sheaf of materials that are readily adapatable accross key stages.That'll be something to work on this summer!
    I have some ideas floating around, which I may well sit down and develop into "outline" plans that could potentially fill a day, then that should have me covered.
    It is probably better to develop my own "box of tricks" rather than relying on books, as it'll mean it's a set of materials I am comfortable using and can always chop and change . I was just wondering what crutches might be handy to have for the first few weeks!
     
  6. I was thinking of a memory stick - but I know that some schools don't allow them sometimes. I can always take in my personal laptop as well if that's the case...
    Brilliant thinking with bookmarking resources on TES :)
     
  7. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    You could also email yourself resources if you know you are going into a school that doesn't allow you to use memory sticks.
     
  8. I try to take in things that dont need photocopying if possible and can be done on paper. I am in the middle of trying to have a book per year group and then base work around that. For reception / Year 1 I use the Lazy Ladybird and plan maths, Literacy and Art activities. Year 2 is Jack and the Beanstalk or The Owl who was afraid of the dark. Year 3/4 is The True Story of The Three Little pigs. I haven't worked out a book yet for Year 5/6!
     
  9. Personally I wouldnt take my own laptop in, a lot of schools dont like it. It's not been checked by their electrical people and I'd think it could be an insurance nightmare too.
    The book a year is a good idea. Only thing I'd say though is what if you are in the same class multiple times in a month without planning, you cant do the same work over and over, also if the class have just done a big topic on it or even in the past year they'll be less open to it.
    If you are still looking for a Y5/6 book though there's always Kensuke's kingdom, Holes or There's a boy in the girl's bathroom?
     
  10. Tried to edit but got an error :/
    I was going to say, a lot of schools dont like you to take in USB sticks either for the same reasons, you could damage their equipment or give them a virus or get a virus from their system.
    Even if you get access to the computers in school some places dont have supply accounts and wont allow you access to a teacher's log in so you have to log in as a child and then you have the problem of the filters that are in place in the system. I've had TES come up as blocked a few times because it can be classed as a 'chat' site, and a few systems dont allow children to download, so you wouldnt be able to download a resource from here in that situation.
    I always go in prepared to have absolutely no access to any of the technology in the classroom, and then if I do it's a bonus and I can adapt my ideas accordingly. Doing things that way has never let me down over the years.
     
  11. Yes - agree with the books and going to the same school! I find them handy if I have never been to a school before and I dont know where anything is. Last week I was meant to be taking a Year 1 class all day and that changed to a Year 5 class at 8.40am in the school and there was no work left! I just love it when that happens!!
     
  12. The best are the late calls where you get there, receptionist takes you to the classroom, ta who was class siting goes 'oh you're here now' and leaves the room leaving the kids on the carpet staring up at you and you think 'oh yey' or words to that effect ;)
     
  13. Oh gosh, these stories aren't scaring me at all!
    A book per year group - what a fantastic idea. I actually have a copy of "Tuesday" by Wiesner which is pretty much wordless: that could lend itself to any KS2 class I think, possibly KS1 as well although I'll need to think about that carefully.
    I really like that book idea, I may invest in a few more today just to have a "toolkit".
     

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