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Are Primary PGCEs funded? (& other questions!)

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by anibee, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    I'm new to this site & looking for some very general advice/information.
    I'm studying a childcare course at the moment working with pre-school age children. I'm a full time mum & want to get back to work when my children are at school. I'm loving the course I'm doing now, but thinking of doing a PGCE in Early Years/Primary. I have a 2:1 BA (Hons) in Design.
    I'm struggling to find basic information. My husband is a secondary teacher & did a PGCE which was funded. Is there funding now? How hard is it to get a place on a course, when do you apply, is age a barrier & are there jobs out there teaching primary?
    Any thoughts/advice would be very welcome.
     
  2. Hi,
    I'm new to this site & looking for some very general advice/information.
    I'm studying a childcare course at the moment working with pre-school age children. I'm a full time mum & want to get back to work when my children are at school. I'm loving the course I'm doing now, but thinking of doing a PGCE in Early Years/Primary. I have a 2:1 BA (Hons) in Design.
    I'm struggling to find basic information. My husband is a secondary teacher & did a PGCE which was funded. Is there funding now? How hard is it to get a place on a course, when do you apply, is age a barrier & are there jobs out there teaching primary?
    Any thoughts/advice would be very welcome.
     

  3. For Primary PGCE: September-1st December for your first choice to be considered.
    Primary is over subscribed at the moment.


     
  4. EcoLady

    EcoLady New commenter

  5. By funding... do you mean a tuition fee loan? If so, then yes. You do not have to pay any money up front. So this year fees are about £3400, which you apply to student finance and they will pay directly to your uni, then you'll pay it back slowly when you earn over £15,000. Fees will go up for sept 2012 start, could be up to £9k so you might want to bear this in mind when choosing a uni - but you still wont have to pay anything up fron
    as said above, courses are over subscribed. however you have a good grade degree (although i dont think it counts as a national curriculum subject?) but you have lots of experience of working with children, so i dont see why you wouldnt have a good chance when yes some ppl may have an english degree, but only 1 or 2 weeks in a school. as you're working with pre school children, if you could get some actual classroom experience that would be really good.
    applications via gttr open in sept or oct. although there is not really an actual deadline, this year for primary you needed to apply by 1st dec to get considered equally with ppl who applied early. the sooner the better basically!
    nope! i'd say if you have used the time to get experience, as you have, that can only be a good thing (in my opinion though!)
    depends where you live... but i think so! i live in west london and there is lots of talk about new primary schools being built or current schools extended due to a rising birth rate!
    hope that helps, best of luck [​IMG]
     
  6. I think it is counted as a national curriculum subject/ relevant to primary education.


     
  7. ah thank you for correcting me! i wasn't sure as know they're really funny about national curriculum subjects... if i wanted to go into primary it would be hard with my psych degree (but that is obv not NC)
    anibee... forgot to say if you have NC a levels that will help, but now we know your degree should be fine anyway!
     
  8. Hi,
    My A levels were English Lit., History and Art & Design.
    Thanks for the advice everyone..the course I'm doing now finishes in July, but I'll be able to fit some experience in a primary school in in the summer term. It's helpful that I've already got a CRB check.
    I'm in the North West, & it has the advantage of being heavily populated, wether this means there are more jobs, or more competition for jobs I don't know!

     
  9. The North West is one of the worst areas for Primary jobs. 100s of applicants for each post, and very many unemployed NQTs and experienced teachers. Not much supply either. Many in search of a job have migrated to London and the South East.
     
  10. Oh that's not good news. It's hard to know what to do really. When my course is finished I'll be able to work in nursery, but the pay is terrible and I won't have holidays that fit in with my own children, but then it is hard to consider doing something that is going to cost money and no doubt be stressful if the prospects at the end of it are so bleak.
    Thanks for offering up advice & information, I appreciate it.
     
  11. Go for it anibee! Money definitely better than a nursery and will have same holidays as your kids (apart from maybe training days!). It will cost money and be stressful... but hopefully worth it. Plus you won't be qualified for ages so lots of time for the job situation to change, and i wouldnt let stats worry you too much - if you interview well and do well on the course you'll get a job!
     

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