1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

AQA Year 10 Lit question Higher? Anyone seen it?

Discussion in 'English' started by tailspin, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. As above - I'm not in the exam hall and am desperate to know what the question is if anyone has seen it at the start and managed to get out of the exam hall.

    Thanks
     
  2. As above - I'm not in the exam hall and am desperate to know what the question is if anyone has seen it at the start and managed to get out of the exam hall.

    Thanks
     
  3. Compare how poets use language to present feelings in 'The Manhunt' and one other poem.
    or
    Compare the way poets portray emotions in 'Nettles' and one other poem.
    I thought that the named poems on the Higher paper were Sonnet 116, Harmonium and Hour so one of these would come up, but it didn't. Although our students had done the other poems, they expected to see one of the named poems on there.
    Did this surpise anyone else or have I misread the guidance on the AQA website?
     
  4. regentsreject

    regentsreject Occasional commenter

    You have misread/misunderstood the guidance. There are no named poems, but there are poems which will NOT be named on each of the tiers. Sonnet 116, Harmonium and Hour are poems which will only be named on H Tier, not on F tier. Likewise, there are 3 poems which will only be named on F tier, not on H Tier.
    The wording is "these poems will only be named on H Tier" not "only these poems will be named on H Tier".
    If you think about it, having 3 named poems would mean those poems rotating every 3 years, which clearly doesn't make sense. As it stands, any one of 12 poems on each tier for each cluster could be named.
    Please come back if this is still not clear.
     
  5. Apparently AQA had a number of phonecalls about this yesterday. Looks like quite a few schools got confused by the semantics.
    The wording changed between different versions of the Teacher Notes provided by AQA too - which perhaps suggests they knew the wording was confusing.
    I'm marking this paper so will see if any guidance is given.


     
  6. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    One of my not English colleagues was telling me today that his daughter (at another school) had been taught only the three "named" poems and that she was really upset that they hadn't come up - it turns out that one of our dept had also read it wrong despite the Head of KS4 explaining it in a meeting. Ouch.
     
  7. regentsreject

    regentsreject Occasional commenter

    Leaving aside any issues about semantics and misinterpretation, it just isn't good practice to teach a minimum number of poems just in the hope that students will get through the exam. This new spec places a heavy emphasis on the teaching of the skills of responding to poetry and that cannot be achieved by teaching the content of a small number of poems. The students need to be allowed to learn how to respond to a poem themselves, and that means letting them explore some poems independently with no or minimum teacher input into "what it means". Apart from anything else, the national curriculum programmes of study stipulate that students must study a poetry text, which consists of 15 poems. In order to equip the students with the confidence and skills to approach the unseen poem, many opportunities to practice this during lesson time should be given, and that means letting them loose on a number of poems rather than trying to cover the fewest possible.
     
  8. regentsreject

    regentsreject Occasional commenter

    Leaving aside the semantics or misinterpretations, it just isn't good practice to try to cover the minimum number of poems in the hope that this will somehow get the students through the exam. In order for them to learn to deal with the unseen poem, they need to be given opportunities to practise responding to poems independently with minimum, if any, teacher input into "what it means". This new spec places a heavy emphasis on the teaching of skills of responding to poetry which cannot be achieved by teaching the content of a small number of poems. In any case, the national curriculum programmes of study stipulate that students must study a poetry "text" and that means 15 poems. So let the students loose on the poems and let them learn how to say something about a poem which is their own, not fed by the teacher,
     
  9. regentsreject

    regentsreject Occasional commenter

    Sorry! No intention to hammer the point home - just a dodgy internet connection! [​IMG]
     
  10. millicent_bystander

    millicent_bystander New commenter

    Thanks for this regents, it's a bit worrying that this exam has been misinterpreted in this way. We covered all 15 poems in the Relationships cluster, so hopefully our students were well prepared. They weren't all happy with the unseen poem though, it seems they didn't feel there was enough in there - I think it just didn't interest them as much as some of the other poems we'd looked at in an 'unseen' context - on the other hand some of the students really liked it, thus proving that appreciation of poetry is down to interpretation.
     
  11. regentsreject

    regentsreject Occasional commenter

    Absolutely! The unseen poem has to be:
    • quite short as there is very little time in the exam
    • sufficiently interesting and understandable that students can say something about it
    • meaty enough that they have some language/techniques etc to respond to and discuss
    • not contain anything controversial or potentially offensive
    Not easy!
     
  12. Hi Regents,
    I seem to have missed the info on the key poems are you able to tell me how to discover it please. Is it on the web or have I misread the spec for this, I thought we had to do all poems. Advice appreciated,[​IMG]
     
  13. regentsreject

    regentsreject Occasional commenter

    Hi
    The information is on the web in the Teachers' Guide for Literature (along with some good advice on approaching poetry![​IMG]) The NC requirement is to study 15 poems. AQA have identified 3 poems in each cluster which will never be named on H tier and 3 other poems in each cluster which will never be named on F tier. Therefore, effectively, you could study 12 only, but it makes sense to do all 15. Just because a poem will never be named does not mean candidates can't write about it. Because it's a rainy Sunday in Manchester and I'm feeling generous:....
    These poems will never be named in H Tier questions:
    Character & Voice: Brendon Gallacher, Give, The Ruined Maid
    Place: A Vision, Price we Pay for the Sun, Spellbound
    Conflict: Flag, The Right Word, The Falling Leaves
    Relationships: In Paris With You, Brothers, Sister Maude
    These poems will never be named in F Tier questions:
    Character & Voice: Medusa, Les Grandes Seigneurs, Case History: Alison
    Place: The Blackbird of Glanmore, Crossing the Loch, Extract from the Prelude
    Conflict: The Yellow Palm, Belfast Confetti, next to of course god america i
    Relationships: Hour, Harmonium, Sonnet 116

     
  14. Cheers for this.[​IMG]
     

Share This Page