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Applying to a school/applying for a school place (for a child)

Discussion in 'Personal' started by sian0720, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. When applying for posts, we all know the sort of thing we're looking to find in a school, but I'm curious to know if you'd consider sending your child to a school you think you'd hate to work in and vice versa.
    I once took a temporary post in a school which demanded ridiculous things from its staff but as a result did do brilliantly results wise. I'd be delighted if my child had a place there but I hated working there.
    And is that hypocritical?
    What are others' thoughts?
     
  2. When applying for posts, we all know the sort of thing we're looking to find in a school, but I'm curious to know if you'd consider sending your child to a school you think you'd hate to work in and vice versa.
    I once took a temporary post in a school which demanded ridiculous things from its staff but as a result did do brilliantly results wise. I'd be delighted if my child had a place there but I hated working there.
    And is that hypocritical?
    What are others' thoughts?
     
  3. laffal0t

    laffal0t New commenter

    I work in a school I would never consider sending my child to....
     
  4. Results aren't everything.
    If the staff aren't happy, that's likely to impact on the children, one way or another, even if they still achieve targets. I wouldn't send my child to a school I didn't like, but I wouldn't necessarily have to like it enough to want to work there. I suppose it depends on what the 'ridiculous demands' are.

     
  5. And wether all staff found them ridiculous

    I have worked with enough different heads and with enough different people to know that some schools are successful and have happy staff in environments that others would be very unhappy in
     
  6. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    I was offered a job at a school with a fantastic pastoral structure. Fantastic atmosphere (ethos?) I'd recommend it to anyone for that reason.

    However, I was so unimpressed with the department, I turned the job down.
     
  7. Some ridiculous demands I came across were: staff having to come in over the Easter holidays, unpaid, to teach revision classes (children were paid for their attendance, though) staff on a rota so that they taught one before and one after school session per week, Saturday schools/open mornings and so on. This school tended to attract young newly qualified staff who then left after one or two years completely burned out.
     
  8. In many schools these would not be considered to be ridiculous
     
  9. I don't really understand the point you're making here, sorry. [​IMG] I think to demand that staff turn up in their holidays, weekends and spare time, unpaid, could be interpreted as a ridiculous demand - I'm not sure whether you are saying this is reasonable in which case I respect your view but would be interested to hear the reasoning behind it, or whether you believe some schools would not view it as ridiculous in which case it is not ridiculous because of the views of the staff in it.
     
  10. There was a post (not yours I do not think) that suggested that results were not everything and unhappy staff could create an unpleasant atmosphere for the child

    I was trying to point out that your unreasonable demands would not necessarily lead to unhappy staff ... different strokes and all that

    There are academies near me that I find astounding in their working habits but I know people that work happily in them and the kids are happy and successful
     

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