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Applying for a Catholic School......HELP!

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by marzie74, Nov 20, 2012.

  1. marzie74

    marzie74 New commenter

    Hi
    I am going to apply for a RE job at a Catholic School, I am not Catholic but I am a Christian however I am not a practising Christian. I want to apply because it is an amazing school.
    I have not ever applied to any Catholic schools previously because I was very much under the impression that as soon as they read my application and see that I am not a Catholic they will throw it in the bin. I am hoping this does not prove to be true.
    I am however wondering how do I alter my support of application to meet their needs, because I do really want to be considered for this position.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. marzie74

    marzie74 New commenter

    Hi
    I am going to apply for a RE job at a Catholic School, I am not Catholic but I am a Christian however I am not a practising Christian. I want to apply because it is an amazing school.
    I have not ever applied to any Catholic schools previously because I was very much under the impression that as soon as they read my application and see that I am not a Catholic they will throw it in the bin. I am hoping this does not prove to be true.
    I am however wondering how do I alter my support of application to meet their needs, because I do really want to be considered for this position.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  3. I cannot speak for all Catholic schools but at my school that is the first thing we do with applicants is put to one side all the non catholics. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.
     
  4. I'm a HOD in an RC school. I agree with everything Leviosa has said above.

    Ideally I prefer to appoint practicing Catholics to the departent but have at times had non-RC teachers, usually on supply. We ask for a faith reference and I always think it speaks volumes when people apply but do not put down a referee for this, even if they have described in great detail how they will support the Catholic ethos in the school in their letter of application. That being siad, it does depend on the rest of the field. I'd echo Leviosa and recommend you ring the school and ask if it will be an issue for them.
     
  5. I think that you still have a good chance as an applicant, I worked in a catholic school as a non catholic and it didn't make the slightest difference to my department and we were all very diverse in our faith. However if you are thinking of working your way up the ladder to HoD someday you will ave to go elsewhere as theses positions are for practicing catholics ony.
    I was asked on inverview if I had a problem teaching catholicism and i guessed that referred to the catholic ethos of the school.
    Bex
     
  6. i completely disagree with 576. Who gives you the right to define what a Christian is ? Also, I think that 576 and Leviosa epitomise the serious difficulty that RE is in at the moment. I believe that the only realistic way forward for the RE Council's report being drafted at the moment is to hold to a neutral and secular form of RE that is inclusive. The world that you describe is the world of Religious Instruction and discrimination in employment. Why is it that you think an RE teacher at a Catholic schoolmust be a practising Christian if it is not to evangelise at some subtle level in the classroom. If yours are the voices that are to spread within the RE world in the next 12-18 months, then we as an RE community are doomed in the public eye. Perhaps the Catholics among us don't care, and would like the modern aim of RE to wither so that the churches can take more control again.
     
  7. When looking at applications, ALL OTHER THINGS BEING EQUAL (lesson obs/ qualifications/ references etc) we would then employ a RC applicant over a non catholic, a christian over a non-christian. Apply . . . what have you to lose?
     
  8. I would agree with that in principle, but job applications take ages to do and it may be worth putting your effort into applying for a job that is more appropriate for what you have to offer. If you phone the school to ask, they would probably tell you to apply, even if they do look more favourably upon candidates who have more of the knowledge and understanding that they require.
     
  9. Mmm. Great place to abuse kids.
    Ask Sinn Feinn and Gerry Adams' family! (Or the Marian Bros)[​IMG]
     
  10. 576

    576 Established commenter

    I don't - but I've been teaching for over 10 years and the majority of job ads for RC schools explicitly state that they want a practising / committed Roman Catholic. Not agreeing with it - not disagreeing with it - just stating it like it is (giving an unbiased observation of the world I live in - just as I do in the classroom [​IMG])
    I'm not defining what a christian is - just asking how you can be a Christian (or anything else) if you don't practice. It's like me saying I'm a footballer but I don't play! Come on - is that not a ridiculous statement! Surely the definition of Christian is one who practices Christianity.
     
  11. ok fine, 576, you're just stating it as it is that open discrimination is practised in our taxpayer funded schools. Fair point. But you know and i know that the interests of quality RE teaching are not served by appointing on the basis of personal belief. I'm not against faith schools and i'm not an atheist, but i have got experience of going for a job as HOD at an Anglican school where i was beaten to the post by a Geographer who had never taught RE but who is well known in the area for being an active and committed christian. At the time i had about 15 years experience in the classroom. Perhaps i'm rubbish, but I'm glad my child was not going to that school.
    I don't thnk you need to go anywhere to define yourself a christian. Ultimately i think the only judge of who a christian is is yourself (or perhaps God himself). Apparently Kierkegaard didn't really go to church and yet we call him a great christian thinker.
     
  12. chrisoakey

    chrisoakey Occasional commenter

    I agree, totally, with the views of andrew61isiaih.
    Church schools are an anachronism in a secular nation. I have been teaching RE for 25 years and I am baffled how RE teachers in church schools who benefit from this discrimination can justify it.
    How do you teach that discrimination is wrong but deny non-Catholics jobs in state funded schools?
    Time for the state and church to separate and all church schools choose to go private or stop the discrimination.
     
  13. It depends on the school - the Head and the Governors. Some Catholic schools are more liberal in their approach than others. However, I agree with Leviosa. Catholic schools at least want witnesses to the Christian faith. RE is different to non-faith schools in that the RE department is at the heart of the whole curriculum and school life in general.
     
  14. chrisoakey - most Christian schools would base their appointments on the best man/woman for the job. The RE department is different though. It is no discrimination but common sense.
    Should we allow atheists to apply for positions in the priesthood? Teaching RE in Christian schools is more a vocation for the laity.
     
  15. benjybody it seems to me that you have a very different vision of what RE is. The point of the priesthood is to spread the Good News so, while i think an atheist should be allowed to apply, i would understand the basis for turning them down. I do not think that quality RE teaching has anything to do with personal belief EVEN in a faith school. If we are to have a united sense of what RE is for; what its aims are, as we move into what John Keast recently described as a 'make or break' year for RE, then these kinds of fundamental division will only do us harm. My great fear is that that the church schools will walk away from the rest and get on with their own thing. When the Anglican and Catholic churches were in talks with Michael Gove about education, becoming academies and the EBacc, I was disappointed that the churches did not say to Gove 'we will not become academies unless you make RE part of the EBacc' but in retrospect, i expect what the churches were being told in those talks was 'look, become and academy and then you can do what you like with RE - forget your RE brothers in LA schools, they're just atheists and secularists, you're better off without them'.
    So, benjbody - can we find a common ground ?
     
  16. chrisoakey

    chrisoakey Occasional commenter

    The priesthood is not funded by taxpayers, state money. Therefore it can justify selecting candidates on the basis of religious belief. If you want state funding do not discriminate on the grounds of race, gender, religion etc. He who pays the piper calls the tune. Church schools should follow or be fully funded by their church.
    Teaching RE is a vocation for professionals not your laity... and, frankly, it is an insult to my professionalism to deny me access to jobs in all state funded schools.
     
  17. DEmsley

    DEmsley New commenter

    As a non-theist I worked at a Catholic school. However NOT as an RE teacher.
    There is a Catholic school teacher's contract that is standard and basically says that I will do nothing to undermine the Catholic faith.
    As has been said by others there are some schools who do accept non-Catholics and some who don't.
    Go for it and see is my advice - worse case scenario is that you don't get an interview but you've had time to reflect and update your CV and LOA.


     
  18. 576

    576 Established commenter

    Get real.
    Every school will choose and reject people on their own criteria.
    - not experienced enough
    - too expensive
    - not the right gender for the balance in the dept
    - not right for the school for whatever reason.
    At least Church schools are upfront and honest about it.
     
  19. I did part of my training in a Catholic boys' school in norf London many years ago.

    Black kids called the Irish kids 'bomber', Irish kids called the black kids, well, you can imagine the rest.

    It was full of single frustrated wimmin, mostly single, who hated little boys. Weird. They never believed anything any boy said at face value, it was bizarre.

    The kids were actually quite nice but the staff were the biggest bunch of strange people I have ever met. The music dept consisting of 2 people used to go for a G & T every Friday lunchtime in a pub in the locality, in a car.
     
  20. chrisoakey

    chrisoakey Occasional commenter

    All those things are circumstantial and, therefore, variable. If not they are discriminatory and illegal, admittedly hard to prove but still disreputable. Hard to condone systematic discrimination.
     

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