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application advice please

Discussion in 'Career clinic' started by richardspencer1186, Apr 6, 2019.

  1. richardspencer1186

    richardspencer1186 New commenter

    Hi, I'm an NQT, currently on supply whilst trying to get my first teaching job. However, the majority of the applications I've submitted (there have been quite a few!), even when applying to schools that state they welcome applications from NQTs, I've not been shortlisted.
    Therefore, I wonder whether I've been doing something wrong in the letters of application/supporting statements that I've submitted. I was previously advised that when applying, I should write a paragraph regarding all the elements of the person specification.
    If I post a couple of my latest letters/supporting statements, would anyone be willing to read through them for me please and constructively advise where I have been going wrong?
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. shamandalie

    shamandalie New commenter

    Have you tried asking your PGCE mentors for feedback? Or a PGCE friend who is being successful at getting interviews?

    The problem could be the letter or the supply and demand in your area... what do you teach?

    Generally speaking, the whole letter should address the person specs, and show how you match them. Bonus points for showing your knowledge of the school and making explicit what you will bring to the school.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  3. richardspencer1186

    richardspencer1186 New commenter

    Hi,

    Thanks for getting back to me.

    I teach primary and I have asked my PGCE tutor for feedback. However, she stated that she thought my letters looked fine.

    So far, I have been addressing the person spec and how I match them, including the impact on the children or what I've learnt (as appropriate).

    Should I explicitly say, after giving X example, something like "I would endeavour to continue this in your school"? Or as I have already been doing, something like, "I possess outstanding interpersonal skills. For example,....".

    In what way can I show my knowledge of the school? I have been told previously - by my PGCE tutor - that mentioning their OFSTED report is potentially setting myself up for failure at interview or even making it sound like i'm "trying too hard".

    Thanks in advance!
     
  4. shamandalie

    shamandalie New commenter

    I don't understand how mentioning the Ofsted report would become a problem at interview, but maybe she knows better than me...
    You could mention something they offer for extracurricular, or any special day or programme their run and explain how you would add to it. For ex: I feel that I can help with the xxxx club you run on Tuesdays because...

    For your first question, I would say yes, without overdoing it.

    I'm not sure I can help you that much with the particulars since I'm secondary, but I'll be happy to read one of your letters if you want.
     
  5. richardspencer1186

    richardspencer1186 New commenter

    Thanks again for your reply.
    You’ve definitely added few pointers for me to think about.
    If you’d look at a couple of my applications, that would be great.
    I’ll post them on here - probably tomorrow - once I’ve anonymised them a bit.
     
  6. richardspencer1186

    richardspencer1186 New commenter

    Here's one......
    Whilst volunteering in school, I developed the desire to teach. I chose to teach was because I saw how rewarding teaching is. To see the children flourish, and to know that you are responsible for this, is an incredible feeling. It is vital to educate the “whole child”, this means that, as a teacher, you’re not only responsible for the intellectual development of the child but you’re also responsible for developing their social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing too.

    As a supply teacher, I have taught across the primary age range. This has enabled me to refine my skill of being able pitch my lessons at an appropriate level for the children that I am teaching.

    Engaging parents with their child’s learning is vital because the more supportive and involved parents are in their child's education, the greater chance that their child will be successful. I have engaged a parent by contacting them via Class Dojo to inform them that their son had particularly excelled during my lessons. This reward positively encouraged and engaged him in his learning because, in the end of unit test, the child went on to achieve full marks.

    Engaging the wider community within school life is also important because the reputation of the school will be enhanced. This would then impact the pupils because it is vital for children to have as many different experiences and meet as many people from diverse backgrounds as possible so that they become more “rounded” adults.

    Primary education equips children with essential life skills. English lessons in Key Stage One enables children to read by using techniques to decode the English language as well as developing basic writing skills. In Key Stage Two, the foundations are built upon with an emphasis now being placed upon developing comprehension skills by encouraging children to develop a love of reading, ever more complex texts. Equally, in mathematics in Key Stage One, children develop basic mathematical skills. In contrast, throughout Key Stage Two, children learn to apply these skills to ever more complex, abstract situations.

    Whilst training, I undertook tests in the science curriculum to ensure an excellent subject knowledge. I have also undertaken my own independent research in areas of the wider curriculum. I have also sought professional development opportunities. I believe that attending these courses has assisted me in developing as a teacher and engaged me in my professional responsibilities. I would relish the opportunity to undertake the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies. I believe undertaking the certificate would enable me to become a better primary teacher of religion.

    SATs undertaken by children in Key Stage One and Key Stage Two, are used to inform teachers of the progress made by pupils between Key Stages and allow schools to collaborate in areas where they are particularly successful. The Key Stage Two SATs particularly, are used to inform the child’s secondary school as to which “set” to place the child in.

    Teaching mathematics, I have adopted the concrete-pictorial-abstract approach to my teaching, which differentiates and scaffolds the learning to maximise progress of pupils. By scaffolding the learning, I am able to assess the children, offering recapitulations to meet the needs of all learners. I am also able to differentiate my questioning using Bloom’s Taxonomy to ensure children develop higher level cognitive skills.

    Effective teaching must be collaborative, interactive and interesting. I am a creative teacher and alongside using Kagan structures, I have also taken the children outside of the classroom to undertake individual and group tasks across the primary curriculum. I have also “themed” the classroom, turning the room into a shop for a lesson I taught a Key Stage One class as well as dressing in fancy dress to really engage the children and raise attainment.

    Working in a SEN school, I learnt to meet the needs of all pupils. I took the children outside of the classroom for a geography lesson. Whilst I gave most of the children a map of the playground for them to navigate, the visually impaired pupils were given a 3D map of the outside area made of Bendaroos and were encouraged to feel for items. This has enabled me to be creative to ensure that my lessons are completely inclusive so that all children can make progress.

    As well as having experience in using technology to support learning by using Times Table Rockstars and Read Theory, I have also used technology within my lessons. I used a Youtube video of the John Lewis “Man on the Moon” Christmas television advert. This showed me that the use of technology within teaching and learning particularly engages the children

    When the teacher whose class I was teaching in went off sick and I stepped up from my student teacher role to class teacher, I used my initiative to ensure the smooth running of the week and at short notice plan additional, engaging, lessons based upon the children’s prior learning. I particularly enjoyed this experience and I believe that this demonstrates that I can easily adapt to changing circumstances and that I am enthusiastic with a high level of initiative and motivation.

    Using strong communication and interpersonal skills to effectively communicate with children has enabled me to build mutual respect between the children and myself. In my practice so far, I have created an encouraging learning environment by reassuring less confident members of the class that they shouldn’t be embarrassed if they don’t get an answer right immediately because they’re learning and that it’s OK to make mistakes.

    I speak to my teaching assistant regarding my expectations of them within lessons, outlining what I require them to do, whether it is photocopying during whole class input or assisting specific children. Throughout the lesson, I seek feedback from them about how the children I’d asked them to work with are progressing to ensure that the children are receiving the most appropriate support.

    Being keen to collaborate and engage with colleagues, whilst preparing to teach science to a Key Stage One class, I spoke to the science subject leader regarding my ideas, including bringing my pet chameleon into school which the science subject leader thought was an excellent idea. When I delivered the lesson, the children were particularly engaged, I believe this was due to having created a stimulating environment.

    To manage children’s behaviour, I use countdowns, hands up, call and response as well as giving the “teacher look” sometimes followed by a head shake. I have also used a behaviour for learning strategy. The child was kept “on task” by being encouraged to “earn his tokens” by completing his work. By consistently and fairly using these strategies the children are aware of the high standards of behaviour expected within lessons and they can make the maximum progress whilst minimising interruptions

    I am aware of health and safety issues that may arise when teaching inside and outside of the classroom to create a safe and secure learning environment. I communicate these issues with other adults or with the children, as necessary. I did this when modelling how to make apple crumble and pizza with a class of children. I did this to ensure that the children were aware of how to use equipment, including knives appropriately so that the children didn’t harm themselves.

    Within lessons, I include AFL and AOL to ensure the children are progressing. Reflecting on the teaching and learning that has taken place within my lessons, I plan lessons which build upon the prior knowledge of the children. Keeping accurate records and pupil progress trackers allows me to identify the children who are flourishing and those who require an intervention. Accurately assessing the learning enables you, as a teacher, to ensure that you meet the needs of the pupils within your class, allowing them to progress within their learning.

    Here's a second....
    Working as a volunteer at _______ School I developed the desire to teach. The biggest reason I chose to teach was because I saw how rewarding teaching is. To see the children flourish, and to know that you are primarily responsible for this, is an incredible feeling.

    Throughout my practice so far, I have seen that it is integral for all staff to be the supportive of the school’s ethos. Therefore, although I am not a practicing Christian, I would fully support the school’s Christian teachings and ethos. This is something that I have already done whilst working in Church of England schools as a supply teacher.

    I am able to offer a high quality, well planned primary curriculum. An example of this comes from my mathematics lessons. When planning this unit, I scaffolded the learning by using the concrete-pictorial-abstract (CPA) approach within my teaching. I always ensured that within my lesson plans and lessons that I included relevant AFL and AOL as well as differentiated questioning to maximise the progress of the children. Whilst planning my lessons, I set the pupils an open ended “challenge” as a plenary based upon the learning of the lesson. The children could autonomously move on to when they had completed the set work due to the challenges being placed in popper files on the children’s desks prior to the commencement of the lesson. Equally, from my marking of the previous lessons’ work and observation of the children within the lesson that I was teaching, I could plan for the children that needed extra support to receive it either from myself or my teaching assistant. The impact of this upon the children I taught was that many pupils exceeded the expectations of them in the end of unit test, with even a few of the generally less able children achieved full marks. I believe that this is due to my clear, “plain English”, scaffolded explanations.

    During my practice so far, I have learnt that to be the most effective teacher for the children that you teach you must have a sound subject knowledge and stay abreast of the latest pedagogical research. During my teacher training, as a course requirement, I had to complete tests in science on a range of primary subject areas. Equally, whilst on placement, I completed my own independent research in subject areas where I felt less confident. Equally, I have actively sought professional development opportunities. For example, I have attended SMSC training and Paediatric First Aid training. I also attended the UKLA conference in Manchester regarding creativity and the use of ICT within the English curriculum. Since gaining my QTS, I have also attended a further safeguarding course. I believe that attending these courses has assisted me in developing as a teacher and given me an awareness of my professional responsibilities. This is particularly true of the safeguarding course. Alongside this I have seen that, it is also vital that effective learning takes place as a result of teaching. Throughout my practice, I have used Bloom’s Taxonomy to differentiate my questioning of the children and to formatively and summatively assess the children during lessons. The reasoning behind this is to scaffold the learning and to ensure that deeper learning takes place. After the lessons, to ensure that appropriate interventions could take place and also to ensure that I pitched subsequent lessons based upon what the children already knew, I ensured that I compiled accurate assessment data outlining which children achieved and didn’t achieve the learning objective.

    My background in customer service means that I possess strong communication and interpersonal skills. I have utilised these skills to effectively communicate with all members of the school community. I believe that to promote successful teaching and learning within a class, it is vital to build mutual respect between the children and the teacher. In my practice so far, I have done this by positively encouraging less confident members of the class to “have a go”. I did this by telling them that they shouldn’t be embarrassed if they don’t get an answer right immediately because they’re learning and that it’s OK to make mistakes. I did this because, I believe, you learn more from making mistakes. I have also utilised these skills to develop professional relationships with parents too. An example of this is from when I used the messaging function of Class Dojo to contact the father of one of the pupils who had particularly excelled during my lessons. The parent that I contacted was particularly pleased with the news and even took his son out for a meal as a reward. I also believe that to really get to know the children and become the most effective educator for them, it is vital that you develop these relationships with the parents. Equally, I have also used these skills to develop professional relationships with other staff members. I have seen that it is vital to develop relationships with colleagues, so that you can exchange advice on each other’s practice as well as to support particular children. I believe that it is important to develop a strong relationship with any additional adults within your classroom so that the children receive appropriate support. I have done this by routinely speaking to my teaching assistant regarding my expectations of them within that lessons, whether it was photocopying whilst I was giving whole class input or assisting specific children during an activity. Throughout the lesson, I endeavour to seek feedback from them regarding how the children I ask them to work with are progressing so that I can adapt my teaching, as appropriate.

    Whilst teaching a Key Stage One class, I took the children outside of the classroom for a geography lesson. Depending on their ability, I encouraged the children to navigate to and feel, listen and look for a variety of items using the directional language that they had been learning. During this lesson, I structured the learning by developing a map for the pupils – including a 3D map for visually impaired pupils, so that they knew where in the school grounds to look for specified items. This has shown me, not only how to be flexible to meet the needs of all learner but also that to excite, enthuse and inspire children, as a teacher, you must offer as many different learning experiences as possible. Similarly to this, I am passionate about participating in school activities including extracurricular activities and PTFA events. For example, although I am a terrible singer, I have assisted with the running of the school choirs. I also demonstrated that I am a team player by attending all staff meetings – contributing as appropriate, running an activity during a Super Learning Day for the Jewish festival of Purim and I also attended the Christmas Choir Concert to support the children that I had been working with. I would continue with this at your school, however, I would especially embrace the opportunity to establish my own club within school. As a geographer, which is clearly my curriculum strength alongside mathematics and science, I am particularly interested in animals and the natural world. I currently own a chameleon and a leopard gecko and have links with the owner of a reptile shop in Blackpool and would love to share this passion with the reptile keepers of the future – the children.

    Within the classrooms in which I teach, I create a stimulating learning environment by designing interesting classroom displays to act as a reminder to the children and also to enhance the deep learning. I try to ensure that the displays that I create are bright and incorporate various learning styles. Depending on the needs of the children, I can also make these multi-sensory. The idea behind this is to create an inclusive environment so that all children can gain something from the displays.

    Throughout my practice, I have adapted and adopted a range of both verbal and non-verbal behaviour management techniques. Examples of behaviour management techniques that I regularly use within my practice are the countdown, hands up, call and response as well as giving the “teacher look” which is sometimes followed by a head shake. I have also used a behaviour for learning strategy for one of the children. The child was kept “on task” by being encouraged to “earn his tokens” by completing his work. If he did this, he would be rewarded with choosing time at the end of the lesson. By consistently and fairly using these strategies the children are aware of the high standards of behaviour expected within lessons and they can make the maximum progress whilst keeping interruptions to a minimum.

    During the final week of my teacher training, the teacher whose class I was teaching in went off sick. This meant that I had to quickly step up from my student teacher role to that of class teacher. I loved this experience and during this time I was able to demonstrate that I am highly organised, and I am also able to use my initiative. This week in particular made me recognise the importance of organisation and using my initiative because to ensure the smooth running of the week these were skills I had to utilise. At short notice I was required to plan additional, engaging, lessons based upon the children’s prior learning across the National Curriculum and the wider sensory curriculum taught in school.

    I would relish the opportunity to demonstrate the points above at interview and through a lesson observation. I look forward to hearing from you soon.
     
  7. sbkrobson

    sbkrobson Star commenter

    Thank you for allowing us to read your application letters.
    I hope you appreciate my honesty-they are very long. Paragraph for paragraph it is possible to present the same content in half as many words, if not a third; 46 words about your pets can be reduced to 12 words "I keep unusual pets myself, so could share this expertise if relevant." And in some places I thought you may have been able to render a twenty word sentence in three or four words.
    Additionally, you have written some points almost as if a diary, with minute detail and imagery. I'm not sure such detail of how specific people reacted or your own motivation is necessary to make the same point.

    I wish I could find it, I read it only last week, one of the "most popular threads" which appear to the right of the screen here, featuring TheoGriff, and it dealt with "Application no no's". This would make sensible reading for you, so perhaps another poster can find it and post the link. Lots and lots of ideas of "stuff to avoid" in your application. And some good descriptions of how an employer deals with multiple applications, the sifting process.

    Just shorten your letters. Substantially.
    If this bemuses you, try simply removing the first clause or sentence from every paragraph, and you'll see an immediate difference.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2019
  8. annascience2012

    annascience2012 New commenter

    Dear OP,
    Thanks for showing us your lovely covering letter.
    My first advice would firstly be that it's quite a bit too long. A good covering letter should be about one typed A4, including the addresses, signature etc.
    Secondly, structure it so that the best stuff is at the top. Even head teachers can suffer from 'TLDR' so even if the only read half of it, make sure it's the good half.
    Some of the stuff on there is unique and personal to you, and make you stand out, and that stuff should be made more prominent. Things like your science knowledge, reptiles, multi sensory displays (cool!). Other stuff on there is really stating the obvious and you should remove it - things like how you attend staff meetings or have BfL techniques (we all do, and anyway this goes in the reference).
    Finally I recommend you pare down your writing style. Currently you use 4 sentences about each point, when one will do - have a go at stripping it right down. You can elaborate at interview on any of the points they are interested in. In one of my recent covering letters I wrote "and I would be delighted to tell you more about this at interview" about some special responsibility I have. They did ask about it at interview, and I could speak about it at length.
    Good luck and best wishes, you sound like a great nqt who has done lots of exciting things and has loads to offer.
     
    agathamorse and Piranha like this.
  9. annascience2012

    annascience2012 New commenter

    Oops @sbkrobson I was writing at the same time as you! Glad your advice matches mine :)
     
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  10. sbkrobson

    sbkrobson Star commenter

    Yes, that happens, and yes,we appear to have said similar.

    While I am here, thank you for this

    It's a smart sentence on several levels, and I shall think about using it myself when/if I submit future applications
     
    agathamorse and annascience2012 like this.
  11. richardspencer1186

    richardspencer1186 New commenter

    Thanks for your feedback guys.

    So some stuff you’d leave out - even if it says on the person spec that’s what they’re looking for within the application?

    Apologies if that’s a stupid question!
     
    annascience2012 likes this.
  12. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    To start with a word of encouragement, I think there is a lot here that makes me thing you look like a good teacher. It is just a question of getting it in the right form.

    I agree with the comments about the length of the letter. The point of a covering letter is to set you apart from the bulk of applicants to get you to the interview stage. So, you need to think about which are the most important points. You don't need to cover everything about you. As has been mentioned, look at the person and job specs to make sure you cover the key points in those. And think about the things you are most proud of. A lot of the things you mention might be "nice to have" but I doubt if, for example, you contacting the parent of a child who did well is going to help. Indeed, how you deal with parents whose children are not doing well is probably more important. However, the part about you taking over a class is of interest; you don't need to explain what this involves (they know) but if you can demonstrate that you can do this successfully, that will be useful.

    Anything that you can offer the school which they may not have already is relevant. For example, your interest in unusual animals. Could you flesh out just a bit what your club might do?

    If there is space elsewhere in the application process, I wouldn't bother to mention course you went on unless there is something of particular interest in one or two of them. And please don't tell them things they know already, such as how SATS are used. I also wouldn't bother with the standard things that people mention, such as "team player" (unless it is on the person spec) - it never impressed me when I was involved in recruitment as so many people say it who turn out not to be good team players. If it does seem right to use it, make sure any evidence sets you apart - going to staff meetings doesn't.

    I tend to agree that mentioning the Ofsted report is not massively helpful. However, it is good to say something about the school which is specific to them. Look at the website. Near the top, perhaps in a mission statement (I hate mission statements) you will see how the school sells itself. You can use this to show why you want to work there and how you will be part of their ethos. Flatter them a bit!

    So, you have got your letter down to one side, with short paragraphs which show why you want to work there and why they should want you to work there. Each sentence will pique their interest and make them want to go on reading. And then, you find a trusted friend or two and get them to help you make it even better. Good luck!

    I was about to post when I saw your new question appear. I suppose it depends on how many things they mention. Probably, you can get everything in if you keep it very brief for some of the points.
     
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  13. annascience2012

    annascience2012 New commenter

    Yes you have to leave things out, and anyway many of those things will go in the reference (and are more appropriate coming from your referee). E.g. let's say they want someone who is punctual and reliable. It's not convincing anyone if you say "I am punctual and reliable". However, your referee can say this about you.
    Secondly it's not that convincing to say, for example, "I have good behaviour management techniques" or "I have a nice manner with the students". Again, this is best judged by your referee; and you can also demonstrate this during your interview lesson.
    I've done several teacher references before so I can tell you more about that if you're interested.
    All the best xx
     
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  14. richardspencer1186

    richardspencer1186 New commenter

    Thanks for all this info guys.

    It’s definitely very helpful and insightful.

    So I think these are the things I need to do, please feel free to correct me if I’m wrong/missed anything out:

    Don’t write more than about a page.
    Start off with the best stuff - don’t necessarily have to write in the same order as the person spec (as I’d been told previously!).
    Only include things on the person spec that won’t be covered in the application form/reference.
    Don’t go into minute detail - only one sentence ish for each point on the person spec.
    Ensure that I relate aspects of my practice to the mission statement/ethos/school visit.
     
    annascience2012 likes this.
  15. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    Wow - it is nice to have somebody coming back with thanks and more questions like this. My own view would be that your list is pretty good except I would include things that might be on your reference if they are strong selling points for you. I would also point out that, as far as I know, schools tend to take references from people they are really interested in seeing, so may not see the things you want them too know if you don't say them yourself. So, the points @annascience2012 makes are valid, but don't rely on the reference to tell them about you running the choir.

    Not every point needs to be on the spec. If it is a good selling point, such as your unusual animals theme, include it. But rather than get too hung up about whether to include something, try to read it (and preferably get a friend to as well) and imagine that you are a busy person with 50 letters to read. Would you want to continue to the bottom of the page?

    Frankly, from your posts on here, I think I would employ you. Shame I am retired. Good luck!
     
  16. annascience2012

    annascience2012 New commenter

    Yes absolutely agree with this. So to clarify what I meant about references: your referees are better placed to comment on any character traits and behaviours you have. Punctuality, reliability, honesty, integrity, manner with students, "team player"-ness, relationships with colleagues and managers. Of course they will also talk about facts too like your experiences and responsibilities, if they know/remember them all, which they might not. *You* should tell them about factual experiences, responsibilities, stuff you've done, and your motivations and principles and priorities. So yes there will be overlap.
    Make sense? :)
     
    Piranha likes this.
  17. richardspencer1186

    richardspencer1186 New commenter

    Thanks for the continued advice - i'm really grateful and glad that I posted on here!

    Based on your advice, I've actually started an application this afternoon. I note there's probably quite a bit from the person spec, I can actually put on the application form instead, rather than my letter.

    I'm not sure if I've gone slightly the other way now and not put in enough detail! Again your feedback is much appreciated:

    Whilst volunteering in school, I developed the desire to teach. The biggest reason I chose to teach was because I saw how rewarding teaching is. To see the children flourish, and to know that you are primarily responsible for this, is an incredible feeling. It is vital to educate the “whole child”, meaning that teachers are not only responsible for the intellectual development of the child but you’re also responsible for developing their social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing too.My PGCE, engagement with CPD and time as a supply teacher has prepared me to teach across the breadth the primary curriculum and I would now relish the opportunity to continue my professional development by gaining further experience and teach my own class.

    Having visited your school, I am enthusiastic about working in your school because, your children and staff alike live and breathe your Core Values. The atmosphere within school is friendly, inclusive and welcoming. I also note your nurture principles, many of which I also adopted within my own practice throughout my PGCE. Something that has become increasingly important to me as a teacher is showing empathy to the children, offering words of encouragement within learning and by articulating that if children want someone to talk to, I am approachable.

    Although I wouldn’t consider myself a Christian, I believe your Core Values and wider Christian Values are both rooted in being a “good person”. Therefore, I am committed to teaching Religious Education and delivering collective worship. I would relish the opportunity to undertake the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies as I believe undertaking the certificate would enable me to become a better primary teacher of religion.

    One of my proudest achievements within my PGCE occurred during the final week of my final teacher training placement. As the class teacher, whose class I was training in went off sick, I stepped up to the role of class teacher. The experience of working in a SEN school, has not only given me a knowledge of SEN but also enabled me to effectively hone my skill of identifying and meeting the needs of all learners within my class, utilising additional adults as appropriate.

    I believe that learning should be engaging, fun and interactive. I have taken the learning outside, decorated the classroom, created multi-sensory displays and dressed in fancy dress to successfully engage the children. I have also used a range of technology, including assistive technology, within my teaching. I also have unusual pets and upon discussion with the science subject leader, it was deemed appropriate that I took one of my pets into school for a lesson.

    Alongside this, I see from your school website that you place value in extra-curricular activities. I particularly enjoyed partaking in after school activities throughout my PGCE and assisted with the school choirs throughout both placements, I would now relish the opportunity to share my knowledge of my unusual pets with your children and establish an after-school club within this area. Within my club, the children would learn about native species and habitats as well as those from further afield and be actively involved in British and global conservation efforts. I would also, if appropriate, use my contacts to offer the children interactive experiences with the animals.

    In conclusion, my PGCE course, placements and experience as a supply teacher have demonstrated to me what a challenging, exciting and rewarding career teaching is. I look forward to shaping young lives so that children can fulfil their potential and achieve whatever they desire.

    I would be delighted to discuss any of the points above in further detail at interview.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 10, 2019
    annascience2012 likes this.
  18. Skeoch

    Skeoch Star commenter

    If someone asks me to referee for them, I like to see the job description and I like the candidate to give me a steer if there's something they specifically want mentioned or highlighted - of course I will be honest and as accurate as I can, but I can still market a candiate (or, and I've mercifully never had to do this, make a reference into a gentle warning).
     
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  19. annascience2012

    annascience2012 New commenter

    Dear OP, nice covering letter, much better tone. It can still be shortened further: your first two paragraphs don't add much, so combine them and shorten them right down into three or four sentences total as a little introduction. The penultimate paragraph isn't really needed at all, it's a covering letter so unlike an essay, doesn't need a concluding summary. I'd be inclined to cut it out altogether. The other paragraphs are good, more terse and factual and have a good tone and pace now. Well done (high fives)
     
  20. annascience2012

    annascience2012 New commenter

    Ps actually reading it again, I change my mind: your concluding summary is heartwarming :) leave it in if you have space for it.
    But I stand by my advice of combining the first two pgphs and shortening that part.
     

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