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Anyone teach Phonics Phases 3-6 together? Year 2. Help!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Cakeypie, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. Up until Christmas we had set groups for phonics according to ability accross KS1. At the same time each day, children moved to the appropriate phase group in the school. I felt that this worked really well, it meant true focused teaching to the level the children's need. Children were assessed regularly and changed phases accordingly. Teachers met and discussed children's needs. Teachers all felt this was working well.
    However, for the new year it was to be changed; The teaching of phonics has to take place within our own classes. I have a mixture of children ranging from phase 3 to phase 6, very bright and wanting to be challenged to low ability, slow and needy (this not including SEN pupils). Just the same as any Year 2 class, I am sure.
    We have been told it is up to us how we organise it; within guided reading, at set times of the day or week, through handwriting etc. but honestly, I haven't got a clue where to begin...
    The challeges that the children accross these phases need are all so different. Please could anyone suggest a way to ensure that these children get the challenge and pace they need and deserve in Phonics without obliterating the rest of the weekly timetable?
    With many, many thanks if you have the holy grail of answers! (isn't this what we are all searching for?! [​IMG])
     
  2. Up until Christmas we had set groups for phonics according to ability accross KS1. At the same time each day, children moved to the appropriate phase group in the school. I felt that this worked really well, it meant true focused teaching to the level the children's need. Children were assessed regularly and changed phases accordingly. Teachers met and discussed children's needs. Teachers all felt this was working well.
    However, for the new year it was to be changed; The teaching of phonics has to take place within our own classes. I have a mixture of children ranging from phase 3 to phase 6, very bright and wanting to be challenged to low ability, slow and needy (this not including SEN pupils). Just the same as any Year 2 class, I am sure.
    We have been told it is up to us how we organise it; within guided reading, at set times of the day or week, through handwriting etc. but honestly, I haven't got a clue where to begin...
    The challeges that the children accross these phases need are all so different. Please could anyone suggest a way to ensure that these children get the challenge and pace they need and deserve in Phonics without obliterating the rest of the weekly timetable?
    With many, many thanks if you have the holy grail of answers! (isn't this what we are all searching for?! [​IMG])
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Those stupid phases!
    Have a look at what new learning goes on on each phase ...
    In phase 3 children are still learning the basic 44 sounds (in years 2?)
    phase 4 teaches nothing new ... children are using existing knowledge to read longer words (doesn't need a separate phase you can do that from phase 2)
    phase 5 introduces alternative ways of writing the 44 sounds already taught
    phase 6 teaches ing and ed suffixes and prefixes (children often want these earlier ... He jumped over the river ... Jack climbed the beanstalk) incidental teaching as it is needed

    Personally I would combine phases 2-4 as a single unit
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Not too much yet, but we have put together a huge order of just this sort of thing for the match funding order. We shall see if it is approved.
    You can, but it is only three days and is just this week. I don't have any tried and tested ones and am not certain mine would stand up as a perfect example of phonics planning, works for me though.
     
  5. We follow a mix of jolly phonics and letters and sounds (yes it is very frustrating trying to do both). So with my class the issue was spelling, so 9 weeks before Christmas I started again from the beginning of Jolly phonics (you could do the same with letters and sounds) and covered all the 44 sounds with the alternatives- however the focus was on spelling, rather than the sound. What sounds do we need to make this word? This has had a dramatic improvement on all my HA, MA and LA children.

    It reinforced what the HA children already knew and they understood why it is important to say and sound out the word accurately, they are know spell everything phonetically. My LA group, who only knew a handful of sounds between them know know all he 44 sounds and are making most right choices phonetically.

    I did a sound a day religiously, I also have had a big push with their reading, sending extra words home for the children to read (all phonetically). It has worked for my class. When I go back I plan on teaching 2 stand alone phonics sessions and a handwriting session based on their phonics. We do not do guided reading with KS1 at our school as we hear each child read 1 to 1.

    I think my HA pupils enjoyed the phonics sessions the most.

    I hope this helps.
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Are people in Y2 really having to do this? I would be shocked in reception
     
  7. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Nopes! I would be amazed if anyone other than some statemented children were in year 2 without knowing all the letter sounds from phase 2 and 3. However some of mine were placed in phase 2 or 3 groups because they cannot blend the letters in their writing to spell . Not sure that reteaching them the sounds was ever going to help though!!!

    Sooooo given the above I am now delighted to have my class all to myself for phonics and so can teach them what they actually need to learn! Not phase 2 and 3 sounds to be honest!

    Our reception children are only on phase 2/3 at the moment.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    If they know the sounds there is nothing to be gained going back (you revise them as part of the lesson which should be enough) and lots of practise blending and segmenting

    Our reception children have done all 44 sounds and we don't teach phase 4 separately so they do cvc ccvc & cvcc words from the start.
     
  9. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I agree totally.
     
  10. I have this problem too. Do you have a ta at all? This term I am trying splitting the class into 3 groups. The lower ability being a smaller one, for 20 minutes everyday we will do phonics differentiated for the groups. I will have a group, my ta will have a group then a group will be doing a follow up/independent. I'll rotate it daily so I'll see every group in a week and that they all get the same amount of adult support. I've gone something similar before and it has worked well. Will see how it goes with this class. Good luck with yours!
     
  11. Before all this modern way of doing things us dinosaurs just taught the child according to ability. It it was happened for generations. I prefer mixed ability classes/groups.
    Teaching top set is stressful and teaching least able group is exhausting too. Standards are not higher since all this Thinking Skills, Creative Curriculum, Phases, etc etc have come into place. In my experience AND what I hear on courses children are getting less able generally. Years ago I'd have maybe 4 very very poor ones, about 7 in total out of 28 in language support. Now it is often 40 - 50 % of the class who are not where they need to be. It is not a reflection of the Foundation Phase staff as they have taught KS 1 for years,
     
  12. Our whole school is doing this, including reception.

    KS1 have been working this way since April and FS since December.

    Results for the children are much improved. All the children receive exposure to all the phases and then have differentiated activities. FS last year finished their year working on Phase 5!
     
  13. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Msz, reception in your school gets off to a much faster start with phonics than ours, and clearly faster than many others.
    It's a shame in a way that these fora are split early years / primary. The reception discussions take place in early years and are completely divorced from KS1. A bit of cross-fertilization between early years and KS1 on here might be quite productive ........ after a while!
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    mystery this year we have changed how we work, a whole new programme (staff had their training 4-9th Oct) so we couldn't start until Wednesday. Today most know 5 sound sand can blend and segment cvc and vc words using those sounds.
     
  15. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Are you pleased so far? Sounds-write I believe you said in another post.
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The Foundation Stage staff are amazed how easily the children coped with 5 sounds all at once. As today is only day 2 for most of the children it's early days but all staff (FS & KS1) are impressed with the way they are applying what they are being taught in both reading and spelling.
     
  17. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Oh that's good. I'm sure with the right approach you can really get the effect of "critical mass" and it all goes off with quite a swing. Although I quite often struggle to see how this all works in big groups of children, I can imagine that if it does work it can gather quite a pace compared with one to one.
    I'd love to see it.
     
  18. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    It's much easier if you aren't worrying about unnatural phases.
     
  19. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Yes I can see that. I do still marvel at the wonder of it though! How do you manage with the huge variation in the number of GPCs different children will have grasped for reading purposes, and different again for spelling? And yes, these variations will not fall into phases - no reason really why they should.
     
  20. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    In reality most children in the class will have the same core phonic knowledge (unless they have been taught separately in those stupid phase groups). Some will be able to apply that knowledge to read and spell more easily than others and some will struggle to apply what they know. Teaching them as a whole class means that you challenge some children with more difficult words and give others lots of experience. I'm actually amazed how quickly my class have moved on and using what we have covered in their spellings. You might be interested to know we are starting polysyllabic words next week.
     

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