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Anyone else's pension contribution jumped up this pay cheque???

Discussion in 'Pay and conditions' started by Crowbob, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    Where have you been? Old news....
    http://www.education.gov.uk/inthenews/inthenews/a00200959/final-teacher-pension-scheme-member-contribution-changes-for-2012-13-announced
     
  2. modgepodge

    modgepodge Occasional commenter

    Mines gone up by about £10 but I'm on m1. On the plus side, tax has gone down so overall I think I'm £10 up compared to last month. I think it's now graduated so my contributions are now 6.4% but some ppl pay up to 10%. Also my student loan amount dropped from £49 to £43 and I really don't know why.
     
  3. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    The income threshold rose from £15,000 to £15,795....
     
  4. I know i should have known but i posted on here because i knew you would put me straight crow bob!!! I kind of knew, just didn't realise i would be poorer from this month onwards... My NI up as well. :-(
     
  5. Wait until next April and April 2014 when contributions rise twice more! Plus your cost of living pay freeze.
    Pay more for longer to get less.
    Good ere innit!
     
  6. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    Not normally. I actually don't know the reason why it went up this year...
     
  7. !
    I've just checked my payslip and I'm in the same situation as you - totally sucks!
     
  8. A lot less in my pay packet too this month and hence during a time of pay freeze I and all in my profession have been given an effective pay cut!
    When I rang my local representative for the NASUWT, he told me that there was nothing I could do about this pension increase as the government had instituted laws to enforce it and apparently no teacher even has the right to opt out of this increase.
    In addition, he said that I was the only teacher who had rang him to discuss this matter and hence it would appear (although it is still early days yet!) that many in the teaching profession are prepared to roll over and allow these insidious increases.
    If the teaching profession as a whole does allow this, be prepared, as think tanks have informed the govenment that with regard to public sector pensions they have not gone nearly far enough.
    By rolling over and fully accepting this increase today, teachers will be voting for numerous more cuts to their pensions over the decades to come! Both the government and the Unions are closely watching to see what the response of the teaching profession will be.
    If teachers do nothing, key talent will also drain from the profession as surely as night follows day. Those of us who propose that teachers have the moral duty to teach in all circumstances hopefully are aware of this.
    I am hoping the NASUWT at national level will have foresight enough to anticipate the government's (and future governments) potential to erode pensions even more in the decades to come. Having spoken to them at the local level, I am starting to have doubts about their ability to anticipate and react effectively on our behalf, but they still have time to show the opposite and to be fair they have done fairly well up to now in many respects. (Although, their Action Short Of Strike Action appears to be very ineffective)
    I for one am hoping that both teachers and our unions will come up with a response in the near future that displays much more intelligence and some "lateral" solutions to the messy situation the current government have created.
     
  9. coppull

    coppull New commenter

    We assume in the future you will not giving any of your good will or free time at your school.
    This does not cost you anything..[​IMG]
     
  10. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Agreed.
    I'm not in favour of the superannuation increase even though it no longer affects me (I've called it a day on supply ... or no supply ... and today resigned from my LA agency and filled in the forms to trigger my pension early) but there will be loads of teachers annoyed about the increase who nonetheless spend their own taxed pay on school resources and rewards for the pupils.
    Teachers now need to Work To Rule, undertaking only their contractual duties and they need to stop buying treats for their pupils and subsidising the school's budget by buying wipes and tissues for pupil use, concoctions for cleaning whiteboards (see recent thread for the array of products that teacher buy!) and pensils and biros for pupil use.
    Teachers should also withdraw from school trips, both because of the unpaid time involved and the personal legal implications from any incident/accident. Unions do advise teachers not to take part.
     
  11. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Teachers should also be claiming for additional expenses where applicable.
    For instance, when there is a parents' evening, there are two options.
    1) if there is a gap of a few hours after school before the meeting, and it is feasible for you to go home, you can claim for one of your two return trip to school that day, at the LA approved mileage rate or reimbursement of public transport costs. The school have the forms and should be informing all staff of their rights in this regard.
    2. If it's not practical to go home in beteween because of time constraints and/or distance, your are eligible to claim the LA subsistence rate for a meal. Some schools provide a buffet, after asking who would be happy with that solution, but others can assert their right to buy food of their choice to a certain value and claim back the cost on production of a receipt.
    P/t teachers should refuse to attend after school meetings or INSETs that are not sceduled on their work days. If they agree to attend, it should be with additional pay at the full supply teacher rate (annual salary divided by 195 for a day's attendance and anual salary divided by 975 for each hour of a part day)., payable to the nearest .. rounded-up quarter of an hour).
    Play hard ball, as the Americans say!
    Don't forget to claim tax relief on your Union subs (present and past, up to 6 years ago) and past GTC fees.
    If you ever teach PE and need to provide, launder and replace your own PE kit, with no laundry facilities provided on-site) you can claim a Uniform Allowance of £60 per year to offset against tax, saving you £12 in tax if your highest rate is 20% and £24 less tax if you pay 40% on the upper portion of your pay.
     
  12. planb

    planb New commenter

    I am part time and I am shocked by what the increase means to my meagre salary. I can't see how I can continue to put such a sum of money aside in case I get to retirement when I can't find the money I need to cover all my bills today.
     
  13. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I don't have a big pension as not all of my supply service has been pensionable but I'm now, at 58yrs, in the position where supply work has dried up. I haven't had work since 2 days in early March , with only 7 days in February and nothing in January 2012 or November and Dec 2011.
    I won't get my State Old Age pension until I'm 64yrs and 11 months and don't qualify for JSA Contributory as my meagre earnings over the past two tax years means that I haven't paid enough NI from earnings to qualify.
    I can't get menas-tested JSA because Mr jubilee earns too much from his occuaptional pension to keep us above Income Support levels.
    I am accessing my TPS pension early and it will generate a lump sum and a few hundred pounds per month, which is more than I'm getting at present and will allow us to slow down the depletion of our savings for everday expenses.
    It's difficult to visualise end of career circumstances when they're away but please be very wary of Opting Out of occupational pension provision. You won't be better of by whatever you are contributing to the pension if you do Opt Out as your tax will increase and so will your NI.
     
  14. planb

    planb New commenter

    I am sorry you are finding things difficult.
    What you say makes sense about continuing with the TPS but I am a very long way off retirement and my salary has continued to drop in the last 5 years and is now frozen. Sadly, I may have no alternative.
     
  15. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I'm not actually finding things difficult but would prefer to be still working and paying into my pension, rather than depleting savings.
    With life expectancy increasing (and I hope I'm lucky enough to be part of that trend as well as staying reasonably healthy and active) I want to still have savings when we are well into our sixties and our seventies as we want to continue travelling as much as possible.
    The TPS pension will help us to manage general spending from our combined early retirement income and savings can be for extras.
    My mother-in-law was managing frugally on the single person's State pension and a means-tested top-up since being widowed nearly 20 years ago . Her financial circumstances have improved, removing financial worry, only since she developed inoperable cancer and became eligible for Attendance Allowance.
    A decent occupational pension, had she had access to one when working, would have meant that the bulk of her retirement would have been above Income Support levels.
    She could not afford to replace things like the TV, washing machine etc when they broke down so we used to buy those for her.
    Retirement with only the State pension can be grim if you don't have much in the way of savings.
     
  16. planb

    planb New commenter

    That was what I meant really [​IMG]
    My point is that I would like to continue saving for retirement but I am struggling to find the money for basics by the end of the month. I have spent any savings I had just to keep going and now there is even less going into my bank account. I can't afford to just go out and buy a tv or washing machine now let alone worry about it in my late sixties.
     
  17. Some of us are still fighting this battle... for example the UCU are striking in unison with PCS on the subject of the rejected "final offer" on the TPS scheme this Thursday 10th May.
    This is seen as a reminder to the Government and to continue the agreed industrial action, as voted for earlier in the year. The other "big" teaching Unions will be out in action again in the near future. It was felt that it was "too near exams" to strike... which is the biggest excuse I have ever heard.
    If you thought the deductions this month sucked, well, just imagine how much worse it could have been had the Unions NOT striked and obtained SOME concessions.
    If you are not in a Union, it really is time to start showing solidarity and join one. There are many, many changes coming thick and fast to education and it's about time we stuck together for once. Being divided and conquered appears to be all too easy for this Government to do right now.
     

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