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Anybody else watching 'Are Our Kids Tough Enough...' on BBC2 now?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by lilachardy, Aug 4, 2015.

  1. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    Interesting.
     
  2. WaylonWu

    WaylonWu Established commenter

    Yes I saw it this evening. It was interesting to see the difference in teaching style. The Chinese teachers are obviously very shocked at the lack of discipline of the British students. I get the feeling they will somehow come out on top though. How long is the series for anyway?
     
  3. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    Very interesting. It feels heavily edited to illustrate the point that just importing Chinese educational methods would not work here. I think the same point could have been made in a less heavy handed way.
     
  4. dillydinsoaur

    dillydinsoaur New commenter

    Have to agree with Bombaysapphire about the heavy editing, and will also suggest that the Chinese teachers are being told to over exaggerate methods - *claim to fame* the science teacher taught me at high school (about 10 years ago, in London, I might add) and stayed at that school for at least 7 years, meaning she has good knowledge of the UK education system. Her methods weren't amazing, but she wasn't as robotic as she was on the programme - we were not expected to take extensive notes and we all did an experiment each week.

    We'll wait and see what the rest of the series has in store....
     
  5. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    I found it useful for teaching the Chinese students who come to this country. What a shock for them it must be!
     
  6. onmyknees

    onmyknees Established commenter

    Shocking behaviour from the English students, but equally shocking 'teaching' by the Chinese teachers. An interesting programme, but one that is never going to come to any sort of conclusion and one that won't affect any change in how either culture teaches. Pointless, other than to provide a bit of entertainment I thought.
     
  7. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    I wasn't shocked by the behaviour. It's what happens when children are bored.
     
  8. vannie

    vannie Star commenter

    I didn't think that the behaviour was shocking at all. They seemed just like normal kids to me. I found the programme interesting in the context of OFSTED and what the DFE have been spouting about the benefits of the Chinese system. OFSTED would without a doubt grade these lessons as inadequate. I thought it was interesting that the teachers were teaching the 'elite' in Shanghai and Hong Kong (cities where their high PISA scores are collected) and were not prepared to adjust for differences between children. It was very much 'learn or die'. Of course the regular teachers are going to step in and the conclusion will be that both systems can learn from each other. No surprises there. I do think that the English system will come out on top though.
     
  9. onmyknees

    onmyknees Established commenter

    I afraid I DO see it as shocking behaviour when kids are cheating in exams; distracting other children in exams just because it's too hard for them; chatting during lessons when they have been asked politely to be quiet - several times; and refusing to join in a lesson just because a teacher has had the balls to tell them what she thinks of their attitude. I agree they were bored, but if we accept and continue to let kids adopt this "the world owes me" attitude, when they DO finally get out into the world they will have a rude awakening. (Pardon the pun.)No matter what their grades are, if their attitude stinks, they won't get very far in life socially or professionally. I see it as one of our roles as teachers, to teach them that.
     
  10. WaylonWu

    WaylonWu Established commenter

    I didn't find their behaviour shocking because that is the behaviour of the majority of school kids today. That doesn't of course make it right and I can understand how the Chinese teachers would find it shocking though. I agree with onmyknees' point though that it is a duty of teachers to teach pupils that the world doesn't revolve around them and life isn't about instant gratification.
     
  11. vannie

    vannie Star commenter

    I think that I didn't express myself quite as well as i could have ...... I did not find their behaviour shocking as it was chiefly low level and from what I could see it was behaviour that an experienced teacher would have had strategies to deal with effectively. The Chinese teachers did not have the experience to deal with it effectively because it does not occur with the 'elite' children they are used to. I have seen and dealt with much worse behaviour as I suspect have you.
     
  12. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    You are easily shocked!
     
  13. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    With more careful handling none of those kids looked particularly difficult. I have seen a lot more tricky characters on Educating Yorkshire etc. I can believe that the school is rated as outstanding.
     
  14. onmyknees

    onmyknees Established commenter

    You are easily shocked! ( quote )


    Far from it, I have taught in inner cities and special schools for most of my life and have experienced much worse than shown on the programme. Maybe shocked is the wrong word. I'm just alarmed at the disrespect that is becoming increasingly acceptable in many walks of life.
     
  15. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    I agree.

    I was in one particular school which I would have imagined to be well-behaved and overheard chaos going on in the classroom through the open door to the room I was in. The teacher had no idea how to control the class and the only sanction she had was if they didn't stop messing around she'd fetch Mr so and so, the HOD. He turned out to be as wet as a bagful of wet things, but all the same, the class mostly quietened down when he turned up.

    It's anyone's guess what magic he had that she didn't. The magic didn't last long though, because as soon as he left and the original teacher returned, it was back to chaos again. Fortunately there was only another five minutes before the final bell rang.

    On the plus side, when that final bell rings, the scraping of chairs and other raucous noise that kids make when the end of the school day arrives is over it's absolute bliss, ain't it? A high worth waiting for and one that people who work in less stressful jobs probably never get to experience.
     
  16. scienceteachasghost

    scienceteachasghost Lead commenter

    I agree.

    I was in one particular school which I would have imagined to be well-behaved and overheard chaos going on in the classroom through the open door to the room I was in. The teacher had no idea how to control the class and the only sanction she had was if they didn't stop messing around she'd fetch Mr so and so, the HOD. He turned out to be as wet as a bagful of wet things, but all the same, the class mostly quietened down when he turned up

    I left the profession largely due to the behaviour of student but now in a role where I can now observe teachers and classes as I go about my business on occasion, I have come to the conclusion that the biggest failing is when you don't 'own' the behaviour in your room. Unless things get well out of control, you have to deal with it yourself to have any longevity with a class/school. Thing is, you have to be a special sort of person to deal with the behaviour that some kids in some schools can throw at you. (often literally.)

    And yes, teachers with weak BM will sink even in an Outstanding school. In a bog standard one with challenging behaviours, they would be out by morning break in tears.
     
  17. midnight_angel

    midnight_angel Senior commenter

    A quick check of this school's website informs me that they won the TES awards for 'Best Overall School' and 'Best Secondary School' in 2014 (so just last year). Their exam results at GCSE last year were 87%, including English and Maths, so quite significantly above national average, and yes you are absolutely right, Ofsted Outstanding (in 2013) in all categories.
     

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