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Any runners? Joggers, included!

Discussion in 'Personal' started by tassiegirl, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Having only taken up plodding in the last few months, I am just starting to enter races and longer events.

    I am finding that 10kms or an hour, which ever happens first depending on when and what I'm running, makes my tummy go..... a little squishy shall we say :$

    Today I ran a hard 10km and an hour later was very happy to be in a cafe with suitable facilities.

    Next week I have a half marathon and I'm a little worried that I may - well, lets just say that Paula Radcliffe comes to mind!

    Having been to the loo ample times and having eaten and watered correctly - it still isn't stopping it.

    Shall I just take some imodium to prevent the discomfort and potential embarrassment? I know there will be no portaloos at the event.
     
  2. Having only taken up plodding in the last few months, I am just starting to enter races and longer events.

    I am finding that 10kms or an hour, which ever happens first depending on when and what I'm running, makes my tummy go..... a little squishy shall we say :$

    Today I ran a hard 10km and an hour later was very happy to be in a cafe with suitable facilities.

    Next week I have a half marathon and I'm a little worried that I may - well, lets just say that Paula Radcliffe comes to mind!

    Having been to the loo ample times and having eaten and watered correctly - it still isn't stopping it.

    Shall I just take some imodium to prevent the discomfort and potential embarrassment? I know there will be no portaloos at the event.
     
  3. It's natural, tassiegirl.
    Many distance runners have this experience - you just don't see the piccies of poo flicking very often!
    When you exercise your body redirects blood supply to working muscle sites. The gut is bypassed as it is not needed and to reduce the incidences of having to stop for a pee - imagine you are running away from a sabre toothed tigger, it might be a little inconvenient to stop for a quick break. So your body simply reduces digestive action.
    So after you have exercised the gut gets its blood supply back with obvious results! You can't stop it from happening, it's wholly natural.

    I would try the imodium before the race to check that it doesn't cause any other problems but I would imagine it's probably all that will save your possible embarrassment!

    Good luck
     
  4. akz

    akz New commenter

    Pobble is quite right about the biology of it and it is indeed the blight of the distance runner. If you are keeping an eye on hydration and fueling then it might just be one of those annoying things and imodium will be your best bet. However, have you looked at the speed at which you are drinking as well? I sometimes find ingesting water too quickly or allowing myself to get a bit dehydrated and then gulping water can make the problem reappear (I am lucky I don't suffer too much).

    I am quite surprised that there are no loos at the event as even some of the more rural ones usually try to provide something as there are plenty of people who have this issue and pre race nerves can be a *** too.

    Good luck with your race and I must say I am impressed you are up to half marathon distance with only a few months under your belt. That is no mean feat.
     
  5. As another running teacher type... think that the best thing is to get your body into a regular routine with similar pre race meals n nothing too high in fibre for breakfast :)

    Very very best of luck, I remember completing my first half marathon 5 years ago and now i'm putting in the long runs for marathon number four.

    Keep at it an if you want any pointers on running etc let me know x
     
  6. I run ultramarathon races (50 miles) and as you imagine in a race that lasts 10hrs + this is obviously can be a problem. I am lucky as it seems that when I run I have the opposite issue to you in that I just dont feel the need to go even when (as in ultras) I consume 300cals an hour through the race....As most ultras are on trails in the middle of nowhere then most people just find somewhere discreet in the wilderness to go and errrrrrr go.
    HOWEVER
    Many ultra racers will use imodium during races as they dont want to have to stop and compromise their finish time.....Problem you have is this is not just occasionally for racing it is on everyday training runs.....Personally I would not want to be consuming imodium on a regular basis like that, it cannot be good for you...
    What you may want to try is altering what you actually eat, the volume of what you eat before you run and/or the time of day you run..
    The vast majority of races start during the morning (depending on the length) this could be as early as 8am with an ultra but likely 10am onwards with a half etc.....I would eat something high calorie but low in volume a MAXIMUM of 2hrs before the start but preferably 3hrs.....Flapjack is great......Normally around 500 cals (nice mix of fast and slow burning carbs) but no bulk to it at all meaning it will not fill your stomach and be putting pressure on food through your intestines and bowel. Dont worry about not eating enough before the race 500 cals is EASILY enough breakfast.....Only other cals I would take on board before the race would be a couple of hundred sipping full sugar coke in the last hour or so. Try and train on a morning too. If you train on a night your stomach will be at its fullest and the pressure to poo will be at its greatest.....I pre school run is a fab way to start the day (or finish your run at work depending on how far it is and whether you have showers)
    Also focus on what you eat on a daily basis....Foods high in fat will often make people more loose.....Eat little and often and eat healthy and you should find it is easier on your stomach for running.....I found eating oats and plenty of veg tends to "firm" up the stools.....If you normally eat 3 x big meals look to eat 6 x smaller meals so that the volume of food through your system is more consistent rather than your stomach suddenly becoming a holding bay for large quantities of food which then gets thrown about as if it was in a tumble dryer.
    As for your mileage being adequate for running a half dont worry.....15k is easily easily enough to allow you to run a half marathon with relative ease.....My first half I had never trained beyond 7 miles and then ran Keswick half in the Lake district which was a real shock to the system as was full of monster hills. Finished it though and in a really pleasing time which started off a mad obsession with running longer and longer distances.
    Hope this helps, good luck with your race [​IMG]

     
  7. 2hours,7 mins and 17 secs. I was on track for sub 2hours but then hit the wall at mile 11 and literally shuffled to the end. But I didn't walk! However, it does go to prove that I hadnt done enough distance training.......
     
  8. Still nothing to be sniffed at :)

    Means you have to enter another for the autumn or earlier now.

    If you do chose to do another or any other races maybe try an get some interval training in or see if there are any running clubs nearby to join.

    I've found my times tumble the past 18months since running with a club. The social side too has been a lovely little bonus xx
     
  9. pink_reindeer

    pink_reindeer Occasional commenter

    Awesome. Well done you!!
     
  10. jellytot24

    jellytot24 New commenter

    Well done tassigirl!
    I've also taken up running again, started with no real conviction last April/May and have a half marathon next Sunday. I'm okay with 9-11 miles but haven't tried to go any further - it'll be a real test next week.
    It's been really interesting reading other people's suggestions for breakfast and toileting, I think I'll get on a bit better with my preparation with all the extra info!
    Have you entered your next half yet?
     
  11. Hi jelly, I've just been looking at the Edinburgh half at the end of May. I actually think I'd like to get my 10km PB down as an aim. Last week I did one in 54:51mins, today in the half with 2 long decent inclines I still managed 56:38mins for 10km. To get a sub 50mins, I'd be stoked!
     
  12. Bloody pig trying to fit in the training around the placement. Helps if you have a relatively short commute and interval training helps even if its run hard for 3 mins an rest for 1 then repeat 9 or 10 times. :) found that doing stuff like that soon knocked my PB's down.

    Silverstone half for me at the weekend!! Aiming to crack 1hr 25 :D
     
  13. EmiW

    EmiW New commenter

    I can't add to the excellent advice, but I definitely found that eating lightly before a race and nothing too "bulky" helped. I did the Edinburgh marathon 2 years ago and have done a few halfs since then. I will be doing the half in May too! Trying to get a PB this time. Tassie, the Edinburgh one is meant to be good for PBs as the course is quite flat. (Not that it feels it 11 miles in though!)
     

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