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Any mummies on here undertake a PGCE with a baby?

Discussion in 'Parenting' started by StarbabyCat, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Finally after years of trying to get onto a course at last I've got a place on a Secondary History PGCE [​IMG] delighted but well aware that its going to be a hell of a lot to take on. I've heard a million scare stories about how you have no life etc let alone when you have a baby in tow! She'll be 20 months in September when I start....any advice, reassurance?
    Thank you!!
     
  2. Finally after years of trying to get onto a course at last I've got a place on a Secondary History PGCE [​IMG] delighted but well aware that its going to be a hell of a lot to take on. I've heard a million scare stories about how you have no life etc let alone when you have a baby in tow! She'll be 20 months in September when I start....any advice, reassurance?
    Thank you!!
     
  3. my friend was a single mum to 3 and her youngest turned 1 the month the PGCE started. she had a lot of help with childcare from her mum and then worked into the wee small hours most nights as she could only plan etc once the kids were in bed. she said it was exhausting but ultimately work it.
     
  4. Aime

    Aime New commenter

    Hi, I have a five year old and start my primary pgce in sept. I think as long as you have lots of support you will be fine. I study in the evening for my degree at the minute as i find it is the best time because my son is asleep! I also make the most of any spare time, forget the housework!! I dont doubt that it will be hard work, draining and time consuming but it will all soon be over and well worth it... this is what keeps me motivated!!! Congratulations on your place and Good Luck!
     
  5. Hiya,
    I just dropped out of the PGCE secondary English course last week. I'm a single Mum with 2 boys aged 7 and 5 and I hated how demanding the course was. You have to be prepared to give up evenings and at least 1 day of the weekend to cope with the demands and I realised that wasn't going to be just this year but for a good few years to come whilst you're learning your skills and establishing yourself as a teacher. I decided that my children were more important to me right now but if you have lots of support at home you may feel differently. My advice is to think really hard about the commitment, in hindsight I wish i'd waited a few years until my children were a bit more self suffcient. My subject mentor tried to talk me into staying by saying that I would have the holidays etc but actually these are the only children i'm going to have and the only shot i've got to be a great Mummy and that takes priority for me. I wish you all the best with your decision [​IMG]
     
  6. Thank you everyone for your replies. I know a pgce is a massive thing but this is my 3rd year of applying and I'm desperate to do it; history places are being cut and the IoE is the only place in commuting distance. I have a lot of support around me. I feel at 25 all my peers are fully fledged career wise and I'm dirt poor, relying on OHs salary to live on....I hope I can cope!
     
  7. I did mine when my eldest was 4. It was hard work but it was fine. I was a single parent but had plenty of support from my parents. I had just done my degree while she was around too so was used to working late at night. I don't remember my PGCE taking up a massive amount more time than work does now (I still have no life even 7 years on).
     
  8. My friend was breasfeeding her five month old daughter and managed. She is perfectly honest about it and says it was the hardest thing that she has ever done but it is manageable. You have to be prepared to separate your life and have a good support network. She spent a lot of time in tears and was awake until the early hours most days but what an achievement. Good luck.
     
  9. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    I know a mum whodid it and now has a job. Yes it's hard, but you will be much more capable of coping with the challenges now than most 22 year olds coming straight from unilife of 3 lectures a week...only kidding, but some of the people on our course complained that theyno longer got their 10 hours of sleep and 6 lie ins, doubt you will!
    Also, you can ask for a local school, and most people will prob be reasonably accommodating to you.
     
  10. I did the GTP when my daughters were 16 months and just turning three. Anything is manageable if you go into it expecting it to be unmanageable. Yes, it's going to take up some of your home time but the job as a whole is, so if you aren't prepared to do it during the training you are going to struggle when it's your 'proper job'. That being said, it is so rewarding when you achieve these things with small children and the 22 year olds around you are struggling because they can't multi-task and you've become an expert at it!
     
  11. nandos33

    nandos33 New commenter

    I just want to say what a fantastic thread! It is good to hear some reassuring stories. I've just been accepted to do a PGCE in English, and I have two children, who will be 4 and 2 when I start. While I realise it's going to be tough, I think having children means that in some ways you're a bit tougher than the average recent graduate - for example, if I only have a certain amount of time in the evening to do work I will have to get on with it, and I have many years' practice of functioning on 4 hours' sleep (3 is a bit more challenging!)
    Thanks everyone!
     

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