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Any ideas for teaching Shirley Valentine?

Discussion in 'English' started by aimsroe, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. Hi,
    I'm starting to teach 'Shirley Valentine' to year 9 this term and I was wondering if anybody on here had taught it before and had some lesson ideas. I absolutely love the play so I'm looking forward to teaching it but I'm wondering what to focus on in particular.
     
  2. Hi,
    I'm starting to teach 'Shirley Valentine' to year 9 this term and I was wondering if anybody on here had taught it before and had some lesson ideas. I absolutely love the play so I'm looking forward to teaching it but I'm wondering what to focus on in particular.
     
  3. Joeyriles

    Joeyriles New commenter

    I'll be totally transparent about this: I'm not qualified as a teacher yet so my response might be a tad unorthodox/village hall.

    SV could be obviously well served by seeing a play of it (not sure how viable that is, though my Mum played her in 2000 for a 2 week run in a local theatre, barmy woman.)
    If that isn't available you could always supplement the script with the film version of the play. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0098319/ I can't vouch for its quality, not having seen it.

    Getting debate started is a good idea. Talking about experiences the students might have had which might have been anti-climatic/disappointing (can be later related to the part where Shirley talks about Greece, and it not being as good as she thought.)
    Also, maybe spark debate about women of Shirley's era/class? Ask questions to your Y9 girls as to whether or not they would be as accepting of domesticity in the first instance. (I apologise if this is all a bit deep for y9, I just hope one of these mad ideas sticks or sparks a good idea of your own.)

    Either way, good luck. I'm sure I could call Mrs Joeyriles out of retirement to tread the boards once more. She still knows the lines, as do I (hearing your Mum doing a cod-scouse accent in the front room has ways of sticking with a teenager.)
     
  4. Thanks for the advice[​IMG]
     

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