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Any ideas? Being observed doing a phonics session

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by dustydave, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. Hi everyone. Would really appreciate any ideas of activities that you have done during a phonics session. Most of my children are up to phase 3 in the letters and sounds, but a small group are still at phase 2 and are struggling to blend. I would like to incorporate the use of one of my areas in the classroom eg, sand/water or construction area to plan a small group activity.
    I am being observed and just want to show effective use of the different areas in the room as well as some WOW phonics work.
    TYanks
     
  2. Hi everyone. Would really appreciate any ideas of activities that you have done during a phonics session. Most of my children are up to phase 3 in the letters and sounds, but a small group are still at phase 2 and are struggling to blend. I would like to incorporate the use of one of my areas in the classroom eg, sand/water or construction area to plan a small group activity.
    I am being observed and just want to show effective use of the different areas in the room as well as some WOW phonics work.
    TYanks
     
  3. dusty dave,
    that sounds really hard!
    do you have a large sand tray/area or a very small class?

    In my Reception class I teach a group of ch. at phase 3 (few still at phase 2). We do 20 mins phonics every morning.

    Usually start with song (alphabet or vowel song from Jolly Phonics song book) to settle them, then a 'quick quiz' ie revision of sounds. Could be diagraphs eg ee oo ai or confusion area eg difference d and b; or s and z etc (whatever it's very snappy, no more than 3-5 minutes).
    Then a game. Favourites so far with my groups are: Countdown (use timer that makes noise when time's up) 3 mins for all to take turn in reading a word (use flash cards with words cvc appropriate eg web vet etc (use words from Letters & Sounds, but be careful eg Jacket not a good idea for phase 3; not phonetically regular).
    Crocodile creek - 1 ch is crocodile (we have crocodile hat) other is on stepping stones. Differentiate according to child eg some have single letter sounds, some diagraphs or trigraphs, some words, some captions, some sentences) they must jump from card to card saying sound or word, if they get it wrong they are eaten by the crocodile. I'm very generous and croc only ever gets a nibble. If they don't know they shout help & we go through sound/word/sentence together.

    Let us know how your observation goes. Good Luck.
     
  4. "Jacket not a good idea for phase 3; not phonetically regular"

    You sound like you are really well-organised with your quick-fire phonics sessions!

    May I suggest that you don't worry about words like 'jacket' - such words are perfectly fine. Indeed, sometimes the longer words are actually easier to distinguish or 'hear' than shorter words!

    There are people who do not agree at all with the notion of 'phases' as it is an artificial division.

    It is not necessary and prevents the opportunity for modelling of longer words and makes 'differentiation' for harder to deal with in the class.

    As long as the words consist of letter/s-sound correspondences to date, try to include some of the longer words.

    May I remind people that these phases were never part of successful programmes like Jolly Phonics and Fast Phonics First and Read Write Inc.

    I go so far as to say they may actually hold-up the learning.

    If anyone has any thoughts on this, please don't feel worried about contradicting me with your experiences!

    It could be that when you group your children for additional focused phonics activities, that you limit word length for the slower-to-learn children doing their sounding out and blending, and segmenting, independently (meaning 'themselves' - although supervised of course!).
     

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