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Any escapees?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by fenty, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. I thought this might be a good place to ask - partly cos you're the biggest group of people I can access who know what I'm talking about, and partly cos I don't know any of you so it doesn't matter if I come across as whiny.
    I spent 13 years as a primary school teacher, burned out and realised my total loss of sympathy, empathy or interest for / in the kids wasn't doing them or me any favours. I went & worked in an admin office for a few years, was bored out of my skull but forgot about work the moment I left at 5 & didn't think about it again until 8.30 the following morning. I then took an evening course at the local college, mainly for something to do, and ended up supporting in an adult class. Due to a staff reshuffle, I was asked if I could take a couple of evening classes... long story short, I ended up working there full time. Recently admitted I'd burned out there too, and the SMT attitude was so inhuman I decided I just didn't want to work there any more. Department was downsizing so I managed to get vol. redundancy. I now work in a local training provider, with teenagers. I'm supposed to be delivering Functional Skills, but it never happens.
    I'm waffling again. My point is that I'm thoroughly sick of teaching. I'm moving in summer cos of getting married. I'm looking to find a new job in the new area, but am desperately (careful choice of word) trying to avoid supply teaching / teaching in general. Trouble is, it's kind of all I'm trained for, and all the admin type jobs I'm applying for aren't even bothering to respond, cos I'm either way over-qualified or not experienced enough.
    Is there anyone out there who has managed to escape teaching & do something else? I could do with some positive input, as I'm sliding into being very miserable, and tired of having it pointed out to me that supply teaching is 'good money' and 'how bad could it be?'
    [​IMG]
     
  2. I thought this might be a good place to ask - partly cos you're the biggest group of people I can access who know what I'm talking about, and partly cos I don't know any of you so it doesn't matter if I come across as whiny.
    I spent 13 years as a primary school teacher, burned out and realised my total loss of sympathy, empathy or interest for / in the kids wasn't doing them or me any favours. I went & worked in an admin office for a few years, was bored out of my skull but forgot about work the moment I left at 5 & didn't think about it again until 8.30 the following morning. I then took an evening course at the local college, mainly for something to do, and ended up supporting in an adult class. Due to a staff reshuffle, I was asked if I could take a couple of evening classes... long story short, I ended up working there full time. Recently admitted I'd burned out there too, and the SMT attitude was so inhuman I decided I just didn't want to work there any more. Department was downsizing so I managed to get vol. redundancy. I now work in a local training provider, with teenagers. I'm supposed to be delivering Functional Skills, but it never happens.
    I'm waffling again. My point is that I'm thoroughly sick of teaching. I'm moving in summer cos of getting married. I'm looking to find a new job in the new area, but am desperately (careful choice of word) trying to avoid supply teaching / teaching in general. Trouble is, it's kind of all I'm trained for, and all the admin type jobs I'm applying for aren't even bothering to respond, cos I'm either way over-qualified or not experienced enough.
    Is there anyone out there who has managed to escape teaching & do something else? I could do with some positive input, as I'm sliding into being very miserable, and tired of having it pointed out to me that supply teaching is 'good money' and 'how bad could it be?'
    [​IMG]
     
  3. chicabonita

    chicabonita New commenter

    Haven't escaped as such (ML doesn't count) but I do know someone who set up a business- could that be an option?
    Also- how are your typing skills and spelling of medical words? Hospitals almost always seem to need someone to cover their medical secretaries- many run a pool of typists- but the feedback I had as a PGCE student temping in some was that I was faster and better at spelling/working out what the "missing word" was than most of the people in the pool. I got work through a secretarial agency. It's not fantastic money (I was on about £7.50/hour, about five years ago) but it's better than nothing and as you say, you leave the office and leave the work behind. It's also moderately interesting as there tend to be 'stories' told through the letters, and IME you get a tiny bit of autonomy in that you can type, file, whatever, in the order you want to and in your own time to a certain extent. Sometimes you catch up to the consultant and then you can file your nails until s/he finishes the next clinic ;-)
    If you're moving to a new area I would certainly register with a temp agency to start with. I doubt if they'll be bothered that you're over-qualified, they'll do the typing tests with you and if you can spell haemorrhage correctly best out of three they will probably be happy with you and place you with a hospital or similar.
    Good luck!
    PS As an alternative, I've always wondered how hard/expensive it would be to set up as a private hire taxi...

     
  4. Thank you SO much. TBH I just needed someone to say it's possible - I've got myself so down about the whole thing I feel as though I'm surrounded by brick walls.
    I am searching out the temp agencies in the area today (top of the To Do list). The hospital option sounds interesting - my typing's not amazingly fast but I can spell reasonably well; I shall spend some time practising medical vocabulary!! [​IMG]
    I was advised to go into private tuition, but am loath to give up evenings as one of the advantages of the move & the marriage is to spend time with Mr Soon-to-be-Fenty, and it's still *shudders* teaching.
    Failing all else, I intend to spend a lot of time in nice cafes, drinking coffee, & leaping as soon as there is a 'staff wanted' sign in the window... Ahhh, handing over cakes and beverages, being thanked, washing up - heaven!
     
  5. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    I've just started my own business (Charlie Romeo - Graphic design (in addition to businesses I'm also taking advantage of wedding season and have a few orders for non traditional bespoke wedding invites). Granted its only 2 weeks old but its starting to gro.
    In addition I also teach a few hours at a local University, you could see if they want any visiting lecturers for the PGCE/Education students?
    Also look online at Freelancer.co.uk and PeoplePerHour etc... my friend made a fair amount of money doing admin work through there. Finally there are sometime education companies asking for people to work for the creating resources
    Hope thats given you a few ideas xx
     
  6. Mangleworzle

    Mangleworzle Star commenter

    Ten years ago I started a website, it went slowly at first and then I started another and another. As they started to work properly and earn me money I decided that it was my own private promotion and enjoyed my lowly management position all the more as I was no longer trying to climb some-one else's greasy pole.
    Eventually I got to a point where the income from my sites exceeded my teaching income and I could have given up teaching. Instead I dropped my hours to 80% and have enjoyed my teaching job all the more since I did (and I earn more than if I was 100% and SMT).
    I think the trick is to start slowly and not expect to go from teaching one day and largely replace your income doing something else almost immediately. This is what many people seem to think the alternative is and so never actually leave teaching - also, like me, you may find you don't actually want to leave completely.
     
  7. Thanks for your responses.
    I confess to being something of a technophobe - the Freelancers site scared the pants off me, so the idea of setting up a website is as likey as me becoming the next PM!
    I have now registered (surreptitiously - I'm at my desk!) with a number of agencies, and am investigating some other options, & networking subtly. A definite improvement on the whining pathetic grouchy lump I was last week...
    Mangelworzel - when I'm doing things other than teaching, I think I miss it, but when I go back I realise very quickly that I was rosy tinting it. [​IMG] As I have to move area due to the impending marriage, it seems the right time to try something else, but breaking into a new field isn't easy. Plus the age thing - at 46, the wealth of experience I have seems less important than how soon I'd be retiring!
     
  8. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    See if you can get a TEFL cert, it's wonderful, keen students, lots of fun in the lessons and really puts the joy back in Teaching.
     
  9. Yes, so true.[​IMG]
    I have retired and I am now mid fifties and I am thinking employers aren't looking at someone of my age, despite my qualifications, experience and skills. I could do with a part-time job, but I do draw the line at shop work and a basic hourly wage [​IMG] (Do I want to be on my feet all day I ask myself?)
    I have my CV online and I have been inundated by calls from cheesy, ingratiating people wanting to interview me for an 'immediate start' in special schools. Hmmm. Do I REALLY want to work in a special school at my age?? Not sure...so I suspect that really means 'no'. Just this morning I had a patronising young woman from a supply agency call to fawn all over me in the way time share sales-people do! It really was patronising and an insult to my intelligence...but I guess she is only doing her job and needs the commission she'll get from a placement.
    You'd think someone, somewhere, could use a reliable person who is literate and articulate, reasonably IT savvy and good with people. Young graduates are finding it hard to enter the world of work, so why am I not surprised doors are closed to me too?
    Just here to sympathise and wish you good luck fenty, as well as to say thank you to LMR for some ideas/leads.
     
  10. Mangleworzle

    Mangleworzle Star commenter

    That's the good thing about a gradual transition, you have one foot in both camps while you find out what works. I'm sure we've all come across people who have decided to give up a good teaching job to try something else and ended up having to come back cap in hand to something that they wanted to leave because at the end of the day it pays the bills.
    I sort of found myself in the later position about 17 years ago when returning from a teaching job abroad during a recession to find that jobs and supply had all dried up to save schools money.
    The best of luck, as much as anything I think it's about finding the right thing for you, it'll be easier I think if you try to use the waelth of skills and abilities that you already have than trying something new from scratch.
     

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