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Another red cabbage question

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by cosmos, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. When I went out to dinner recently I had red cabbage with pheasant and it was quite the best I have ever had - far better than anything I have made in the past ( and that was nice enough!). It had a deep, deep burgundy colour and a very soft texture. Is it just a question of cooking it for much longer or is there more to it than that?

     
  2. When I went out to dinner recently I had red cabbage with pheasant and it was quite the best I have ever had - far better than anything I have made in the past ( and that was nice enough!). It had a deep, deep burgundy colour and a very soft texture. Is it just a question of cooking it for much longer or is there more to it than that?

     
  3. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Was it braised in red wine perhaps? With a dark stock to keep the colours deep and rich?
    It can be cooked for a very long time, I find, and just gets softer and softer, but not mushy like a green cabbage can.
     
  4. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    Possibly, however I've found you can achieve a deep red colour if you cook it till it's as soft as you want. It will have turned blue, of course. Remove it from the cooking liquid then reduce the liquid down until there's barely any of it left, then return the cabbage and stir, adding seasoning at this stage. The cabbage will now take on an attractive, deep burgandy colour.

     
  5. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    Mine is always very dark (the colour of ruby port) and soft.
    • 1 onion
    • 2 garlic
    • 1 tbsp caraway seeds
    • 1 red cabbage
    • 1 bramley
    • 2-3 tbsp sugar
    • 2-3 tbsp red wine vinegar
    • salt to taste (usually none in my case!)
    braise for 4-6 hours!
     
  6. I rather cheekily phoned the restaurant and asked them how they did it. Assuming the chef left nothing out (?) it sound much like yours H. Dark brown sugar and they put theirs in the oven not on the cooker.
    Going to try it today. Weather forecast is vile so a good one for a cooking session.
    Thank you for your ideas
     
  7. the evil tokoloshe

    the evil tokoloshe New commenter

    If the restaurant is anything like the ones I've worked in or the ones I've been to that are good, the only missing ingredients are some smoked bacon rendered into the pan at first, removed then finely chopped and added at the end for texture and flavour, and of course butter, big **** of it at the end to make everything taste great and give it a smoothness and sheen. The bacon is mainly an American addition as far as I can tell, the butter is universal
     
  8. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    No. It turns blue if acid isn't added when it is cooked. Try just boiling some red cabbage in plain water.............it goes blue! Then add vinegar and it goes red. Simple chemistry.
    You should always add acid when you braise cabbage, either wine, wine vinegar, cider or even apple juice.
    Yummy.
     
  9. More or less how I do mine, although I tend to use Apfelmus and we don't tend to add garlic over here. I add juniper berries too and a couple of cloves. And often a swish of cinnamon.
    I always use candis sugar and I always add some lemon juice - the lemon juice ensures that the cabbage stays red and does not turn blue.
    One extra I add is schmalz - preferably goose or duck fat. This makes the cabbage gleam and shine and soft and lush and yummy!


     
  10. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    I realise on reading back that I did not specify: I also use goose fat when I have it, lard as 2nd choice and oil falls a definite last.
    My version is based on my mother's - she lived in Vienna with a Hungarian landlady in her early 20s --- hence the very eastern european flavour to it!
     
  11. I made a big batch yesterday and while it is very good,it is not as good as the restaurant's. I suspect they left something out!
    I have goose fat in the house! Maybe I'll have another go.....
     
  12. joli2

    joli2 New commenter

    Can I make this today for tomorrow? I've never made red cabbage before and don't want to spoil it.
     
  13. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    Absolutely! Red cabbage is one of those dishes that works well prepared in advance.
    I'd start it fairly soon and cook it slowly. And it'll reheat a treat tomorrow!
     
  14. joli2

    joli2 New commenter

    Thanks Bethannie. Would you do it on the hob or in the oven?
     
  15. henriette

    henriette New commenter

  16. Oven!







    I don't think it matters, whichever is most convenient! [​IMG]
     
  17. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    Slowcooker! [​IMG]
     

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