1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Another GTP trainee bites the dust!

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by MaryContrary123, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. Hi there, I have been following this forum for a while now because my husband is a GTP trainee (secondary), and has been struggling from the start. I feel that the main problem is his EBT, who is essentially a bully. To cut a long story short, she has been extremely critical and unsupportive from the start, culminating in her announcing after his latest assessment that she thinks he will fail. To my mind she is the one failing; my husband is 40, has a wealth of teaching/youth work experience, and is very committed. He has had NO positive feed back whatsoever, in fact her assessments have been ridiculously negative with very little guidance as to how he can improve. His mentor is barely speaking to him now and his only other colleague is an NQT under similar stress (and who has been told to formally observe him, can this be right?) Confusingly his 2nd placement went extremely well, and his mentor there was very positive and constructive in his advice.
    Four weeks ago (after returning from his 2nd placement) he was given until Easter to improve (mainly behaviour management) and he is a nervous wreck. He comes home at 6pm, eats then works on planning until 1am. He knew the workload would be like this, but expected to be able to progress if he kept it going. He is not sleeping, has lost his appetite and is a shell of his former self. The reason I am posting on his behalf is that he is now so demotivated/exhausted he is convinced there is no point asking for advice. His tutor has been understanding but also ineffective so far and I am urging him to have a frank conversation with her.
    I am aware that this is not an unfamiliar story - what is it about the teacher profession that makes it so rife with bullying? What options does he have to salvage this?




     
  2. Hi there, I have been following this forum for a while now because my husband is a GTP trainee (secondary), and has been struggling from the start. I feel that the main problem is his EBT, who is essentially a bully. To cut a long story short, she has been extremely critical and unsupportive from the start, culminating in her announcing after his latest assessment that she thinks he will fail. To my mind she is the one failing; my husband is 40, has a wealth of teaching/youth work experience, and is very committed. He has had NO positive feed back whatsoever, in fact her assessments have been ridiculously negative with very little guidance as to how he can improve. His mentor is barely speaking to him now and his only other colleague is an NQT under similar stress (and who has been told to formally observe him, can this be right?) Confusingly his 2nd placement went extremely well, and his mentor there was very positive and constructive in his advice.
    Four weeks ago (after returning from his 2nd placement) he was given until Easter to improve (mainly behaviour management) and he is a nervous wreck. He comes home at 6pm, eats then works on planning until 1am. He knew the workload would be like this, but expected to be able to progress if he kept it going. He is not sleeping, has lost his appetite and is a shell of his former self. The reason I am posting on his behalf is that he is now so demotivated/exhausted he is convinced there is no point asking for advice. His tutor has been understanding but also ineffective so far and I am urging him to have a frank conversation with her.
    I am aware that this is not an unfamiliar story - what is it about the teacher profession that makes it so rife with bullying? What options does he have to salvage this?




     
  3. So sorry that your husband is being treated like this. I'm a primary GTP and have had a similar experience in my second school placement - but that was only 4 weeks and i'm back in my supportive home school. Your husband really needs to speak to his uni or GTP provider - they won't want him to leave at this late stage but he needs to get someone to listen to him. We were told that the GTP is highly competitive and only those with the most potential get accepted - well he was accepted so the provider must have seen something in him. That 'something' is still there but has been battered and he's had his confidence knocked. Get him to speak to his provider asap.
     

Share This Page