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ANOTHER Controlled Assessment Question....

Discussion in 'English' started by Eva_Smith, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    English Language Unit 3b - Writing Creative Texts (or similar wording).
    I'm deciding what tasks to set for my classes and am confused (again). There are three columns and I know I have to complete two tasks, from two different columns. However, the examples given....how prescriptive are they? For instance, the 'Re-creations' column, I'd quite like to take a short story adn ask the pupils to re-write it from another characters' perspective. For the Moving Images one, I'd originally had the idea of using a film and asking the pupils to write a recount in role as one of the characters.
    Would these tasks be permissable? The examples given for Moving Image are a film review and a voice-over. Does this mean I have to do either a film review or a voice-over, or are these simply examples of how the children could write in response to a Moving Image text?
    It's all very confusing and I find it hard because I wasn't allowed to go to the Preparing to Teach training myself, the information was passed on by my HOD who hasn't been all that clear and who has just given us a massive pile of paper to read through.
     
  2. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    English Language Unit 3b - Writing Creative Texts (or similar wording).
    I'm deciding what tasks to set for my classes and am confused (again). There are three columns and I know I have to complete two tasks, from two different columns. However, the examples given....how prescriptive are they? For instance, the 'Re-creations' column, I'd quite like to take a short story adn ask the pupils to re-write it from another characters' perspective. For the Moving Images one, I'd originally had the idea of using a film and asking the pupils to write a recount in role as one of the characters.
    Would these tasks be permissable? The examples given for Moving Image are a film review and a voice-over. Does this mean I have to do either a film review or a voice-over, or are these simply examples of how the children could write in response to a Moving Image text?
    It's all very confusing and I find it hard because I wasn't allowed to go to the Preparing to Teach training myself, the information was passed on by my HOD who hasn't been all that clear and who has just given us a massive pile of paper to read through.
     
  3. If you're talking about AQA, I think (*think*) that you need to go to the webite and check what the tasks are for the relevant session. We did these tasks back in October (and the work produced was absolute tripe, to be honest), and I know that we had 'live controlled tasks' which were slightly different to the examples given in the booklets/guides produced by AQA. They're online on the website on the Assessment tab called 'Controlled assessment tasks for 2011 and 2012' and they're available on e-AQA. After much discussion in our department, we decided that it's all pretty fluid - but you need to check what the live tasks are (if you haven't already done so) and then adapt them as you see fit.
    Well, that's how I understand it anyway - I could be totally wrong!
     
  4. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Yes, I've checked what the live tasks are, and I've mentioned them in the post above.
    My question is about the types of tasks we can do. It mentions a film review. Does this mean that we have to do a film review (obviously choosing our own film/slant/audience etc) or can we choose to do a piece of writing relating to Moving Image in our own way - i.e. is the example of a film review just one example of what you might do?
     
  5. Our take on it was that if it says review, then it means review. Having said that, my two lots did a 'review', while top sets did more of an analysis based on the genre. We studied the vampire genre (so looked at lots of vampire film clips - not my favourite - then picked 'Lost Boys' and watched the whole thing. (there are about 5 decent review articles written on that film that I found online so they had examples). In their 'reviews' they did have to mention the genre, I think the essay title was something along the lines of 'Write a review of the Lost Boys for your school website, taking into consideration the development of the vampire film genre' - or some such twaddle. If I remember correctly, the spec makes reference to 'genre', so whatever you watch, you need to place it within its genre. But then I don't know AQA at all. My colleagues (who do know AQA) did tons of stuff about the develop of the genre and changes in it - and many of them did 'Twilight' (it's a girls' school). I think you can also just focus on one scene (lower sets did that) - but it does need to be in a 'review' style. Good luck, I can't decide if it's just that it's a new spec, or that AQA are a pile of fetid wombat's do-do. Either way, I find the spec difficult to understand and the tasks really (really) boring and irrelevant.
     
  6. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    The tasks are utter tripe. This was why I was hoping there'd be some room for manoevere with them, but alas!
    The suggested changed a Shakespeare play into a modern story.....awful!
    The commissons one would be interesting if I had a class of children who could actually be bothered to form opinions. I suppose we could recycle the old S+L task using Room 101...
    Hmmmm, back to the drawing board then...
     
  7. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    Well, the task is to write about a film taking audience into account, so a review is an ideal task, but I think yours could work if they stick to the task. The tasks are in the CA booklet but I can't see examples (and cannot face wading through the box of paper!).
     
  8. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    The task is: "Write about a film you have studied, taking into account achievements within the genre and its appeal to the audience".
    I don't think my original idea of using a film and writing in role as a character would be suitable to fulfil this task (althoguh I personally believe it would be far more interesting!). I think perhaps I'll think of a genre and get the kids to write something which perhaps argues that a certain film is the best of its genre. I'd love to do horror, but I suspect I wouldn't get away with showing examples in the classroom. Maybe a question such as "Is ________ the greatest horror film of all time?" or something similar.
    Another idea I have is to read a selection of war poetry, and see if the children could write their own imagined recount of their experiences. This would be for the 'Re-creations' task which asks them to take a literary texts they have studied and use it as stimulus to write about their or the lives of young people. Alternatively, using Anne Frank's diary could provide stimulus for writing their own diaries, perhaps in role as a character (there is nothing to say that they cannot imagine themselves to be someone else when writing!).
     
  9. gruoch

    gruoch New commenter

    Oh, I don't know. The Beeb managed a successful series doing just that a couple (or more) years ago.
     
  10. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Agreed, but the pupils are advised to write no more than 1600 words for both pieces of writing, leaving not much for producing a modern story. I talked with my pupils about the story of 'Romeo and Juliet' being modernised in stories such as 'Twilight', 'West Side Story'....anything where lovers are from opposing 'sides' and love is forbidden. I suppose they could write a similar type of story, very Daz 4 Zoe.
     
  11. gruoch

    gruoch New commenter

    Actually I agree that it's a rubbish task, but the word limit has now gone which might help.
     
  12. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    Why not? So long as they write about the film (the character could discuss scenes in the film) and why audiences will want to see it, they would be OK. If you chose a horror, musical, romcom, the actor could mention similar films and what makes theirs different or better.
    I get the impression that AQA are not going to quibble about titles so long as you get students to work broadly within the demands of the task. There is certainly no suggestion that they must write a review or that they cannot write as an actor or director. I think the genre/audience instruction stops them telling the story of the film but could be incorporated into different writing styles.
     
  13. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    I'm not sure the task I have in mind fits the bill.I want the children to do some creative writing in role as a character: a recount of a character's experiences, and additional scene involving that character, a monologue, a diary entry or similar. I had intended to ask the children to write in role as a Titanic survivor (using the film as stimulus) encouraging them to write from different points of view to create memoirs for real and fictitious passengers: Bruce Ismay, Molly Brown, third class men, children etc. I can't see how they would be able to discuss scenes from the film and their success in this format, or why audiences would want to see the film.
    Our HOD is having all titles checked by some AQA big wig that she has as a contact. His advice so far seems to be rather contrary to all advice given by those 'in the know' on this forum. I rather feel that some advice found here is more accurate, however my HOD is insisting on doing it his way.
     
  14. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I think that's stretching it. They could write as one of the actors talking about the film and why it's so popular (probably one of the most popular 'disaster movies'), but they'd probably go off task, which is definitely to write about the film.
     
  15. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    I wonder if I could do something based on films of the Noughties. In a sort of 'Film of the Decade' sort of thing. I have next to no inspiration for this CA I must admit.
     
  16. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I did a film review, 'teaching' a film and then magazine writing. Afterwards, I thought it would have been easier to do a lesson on genre and let them choose their own film. After all, it's not an essay on genre and audience; they just have to show awareness of them. I quite like the task because it's accessible to all and there's no requirement to analyse. For the more able, I think magazine writing enables them to demonstrate that they can use vocabulary and syntax for effect.
     
  17. anteater

    anteater New commenter

    The producing (so-called) creative texts tasks <u>are</u> set in stone (unlike the extended reading ones, which you can tinker with) - that's what we were told when we phoned up to check at the start of the year. - so I wouldn't risk straying too far away from the rubric.
     
  18. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Right how about this for the moving image:

    "Write an article for Empire film magazine in which you debate the following statement: Modern horror films are just not scary"
    Or something similarly worded.
    I'm intending on getting them to watching a couple of 'classic' horrors such as 'Psycho' and then comparing them to more modern horror films of the "Sexy teens run away from bad man" type.
     
  19. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I think that sounds fine although I would street them wards writing about one film and referring to others of the genre, rather than debating the statement.
     
  20. Eva_Smith

    Eva_Smith Established commenter

    Yeah, still working that bit out. I think I'm going to get them to pick a more recent horror film and debate if it lives up to the classics (think Psycho etc).
     

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