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Animal Camouflage Activities?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by impulce, Jun 4, 2010.

  1. I am doing an art week next week centred around animal print. Does anybody have any nice independant activities I could have out for the other children to access while I am working with focus groups? They are KS1. So far all I can think of is small world play with the jungle animals etc, and some detailed colouring pictures I have found that the children can colour relevant camouflage colours..

    Thankyou in advance!
     
  2. I am doing an art week next week centred around animal print. Does anybody have any nice independant activities I could have out for the other children to access while I am working with focus groups? They are KS1. So far all I can think of is small world play with the jungle animals etc, and some detailed colouring pictures I have found that the children can colour relevant camouflage colours..

    Thankyou in advance!
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Hiding Animals

    You need two copies of an image for each child doing this activity. Tell
    the children to colour one image realistically and the other oddly,
    using colours not normally seen with the animal. Cut out the two images.

    Take the pictures outdoors and instruct the children to hide their
    two animals without placing them under rocks, leaves, or logs. Then tell
    the children that they have them look for the animals hidden by other
    children.

    http://www.brainpopjr.com/science/animals/camouflage/grownups.weml#teachers
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I've also used a light box with 2 sheets of animal print per pattern
    1 sheet is placed on the light box the other sheet is used to cut out an animal shape - spots might be a cheetah - stripes a tiger the children have to place the animal cut outs so they can't be seen.
     
  5. One idea which I have done with Y1 and Y2 is to get hold of some animal print tissue paper - and cut into roughtly A4 size pieces (a bit longer for giraffe!). Then present children with range of pictures, soft toys or even plastic models of relevant animals , and get children to draw on and cut out their version of which ever. (May need some reminding of which animal has which skin pattern.!) I've seen tissue paper in giraffe / zebra / tiger / croc / and leopard,(and Friesian cow. ) ELC , Wilko, The Works and Hobbycraft may have this. I also know IKEA do a series of animal-print wrapping paper. Good luck. I'll try and think of some more ideas and get back to you later.
     
  6. Ramjam

    Ramjam New commenter

    I show the children a ppt of some camouflage pictures ( I expect you already were) and ask them to identify why the animals are so well camouflaged.
    If the children can be persuaded to bring in kitchen roll tubes, they can do 3D creatures, otherwise ask them to paint/ oil pastel an alien / snake/ etc on one session. The next session they must create a background on paper, then find where their creature would be best hidden. Mine love that as a competition - it really focuses them on the task and it makes a great display.
    Other activity is a woolly worm hunt, though we have to have adult supervision for children out doors and you really need grass or a base with variegated shade.
    You need 15 lengths each of several different colours of wool about 7-8cm is OK lengths of sticky tape stuck on rulers sticky side up.
    I usually ask children if they can be different lengths - brings an immediate fair test reponse. Children decide which will be the easiest / hardest to see. Arrange their decision on one ruler and keep.
    Ask adult to spread 'worms' over a set area. Send children for set time e.g. 3 minutes and collate worms onto sticky paper in colour groups. Does it match their estimate? There's always lots of discussion and good explanations going on - use easy speaks for children to record what they think so you can check up later.
     
  7. Thanks for the ideas so far :)
    As my main focus group work is art based and im pretty much sorted for those activities, id love to hear of any more independant activities. I do plan on taking them outside and using the activities that involve the grass but as I dont always have a TA for this I need plenty to occupy those independant workers in the classroom too :)
     
  8. inq

    inq

    I've done an activity where the children paint a piece of paper in animal print style e.g. orange and black stripes/ black and white stripes, they then, on another piece of paper draw round a stencil (or paint a photocopy) of the same animal. you then cut out the animal and stick it against the background using a couple of sticky pads so that it stands out. very easy and very effective.
     
  9. comenius

    comenius New commenter

    • Have a pile of 'Where's wally?' books available
    • use a graphics program on the computer - provide clip art of animal and children have to create environment around it to camoufllage - we used softease and I had photos of animals camouflaged that they could look at eg giraffe, zebra, tiger
    • Print off and laminate lots of camouflaged pictures - children spot the animal and circle it and write what animal it is.
    • matching game - match animal to habitat
    • strip of card covered in double sided tape - attach an animal to one end eg lion children go outside (if able to) and find things that would camouflage the lion and stick to tape eg yellow leaf, grass. If they can't use the outdoors provide variety of collage and natural materials indoors that the children can find to match.
    • set up habitat boxes eg sand, soil, water, grass, plants, ice.... Have lots of toy animals, insects, fish etc and children place them in the correct habitat so they would be camouflaged.
    Writing opportunities could be added to any of the above activities.
     

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