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And one for the ANTI gardeners

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Spiritwalkerness, Aug 18, 2015.

  1. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    I'm of the 'give it a pull and if it comes off/out then' it goes in the Green Bin to be taken away - similarly,'if it's brown - it goes'

    I can mow a lawn and have made a damned good job of making the privet hedge a lovely rolled sort of affair.

    What I'm after is advice on how to destroy several things that keep alive despite my best efforts

    1) Ivy - it's eaten away one corner of my conservatory, it's eating away the fencing (that ivy is the neighbours but it will insist upon encroaching)

    2)Valaria - stinks of dog wee and will not go, no matter how much I pull up/dig out

    3)Bamboo - again the neighbours but it cares not a jot for boundary fencing

    4)Something I have no idea what it's called but it has leaves like a flag/iris and then little orange flowers. For the past 7 years I have dug the wretched things out but still they keep on coming

    5) Elderberry - I've sawn, chainsawed, covered the stump in diesel/creosote but there it is stinking of dead

    I could do with some Napalm or Agent Orange but I daren't start an internet search to see where I can buy it...INCOMING!!!!

    Please, for the love of whatever, help me
     
  2. RedQuilt

    RedQuilt Star commenter

    I feel your pain! My gardener has some 'stuff' that is industrial strength killer but relatively safe around animals. It's recently killed off a particularly rampant BlackBerry hedge, a sycamore invasion and a rather nasty plum tree sucker attack on one of the lawns. Would it be worth getting a professional in for a half hour consultation?
     
  3. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    Well yes, but I was hoping the sages on here (I have a sage 'tree' too but I like the smell) could tell me of some wonder buy from Aldi or Lidl [​IMG]
     
  4. RedQuilt

    RedQuilt Star commenter

    Ah, I see. Well, having recently tried lidl's own instant coffee I'd recommend pouring a gallon of it over the offending areas as it's bound to kill everything off. You'd best wear protective gloves when preparing it though.
     
  5. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Cut them all down to ground and treat with a stump and root killer containing glyphosate (e.g. Scotts Roundup Tree Stump & Rootkiller, Bayer Tree Stump Killer, Doff Tree Stump & Tough Weedkiller and William Sinclair Deep Root Ultra Tree Stump & Weedkiller) or triclopyr (Vitax SBK Brushwood Killer).
     
  6. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    *titters @ Red's suggestion* Yes that's the sort of thing I need.

    Nomad - I know Mr Sinclair of Deep Root fame, it's a local company - I'll get him round

    Thanks for the suggestions so far
     
  7. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    That sounds like Montbretia (crocosmia). It does tend to spread but I keep mine under control by pulling chunks out in the autumn when it dies down. I think it's beautiful. In Canada they call it 'Indian's paintbrush'.



    [​IMG]



     
  8. smoothnewt

    smoothnewt Star commenter



    We have this in our garden and I encourage it to spread: lovely flowers at the time of year when a lot of things are ceasing to flower and the garden looks bare.
     
  9. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    Them's the very things! Yes they were rather pretty when there was just a little clump. But each year I dig what seems to be 10,000 little bulbs up. It just seems to make it more fecund!

    At last I have a name for them now and I'm going to go with Indian's Paintbrush - I may grow to love them again
     
  10. You need to really turn the earth over and pull out every last little bulb. Every year I take clumps of crocosmia to school t give away but it never seems to get any thinner. Ditto the loosestrife.

    Re the ivy and bamboo - if the main root is in your neighbour's, just weedkilling the bits you can get at won't make any difference. I have the same problem and all I can do is keep cutting and chopping wherever it pokes its rampant little shoots up.
     
  11. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    I like the idea of gardening it's just the reality of it I loathe - I just get it looking reasonable, I turn my back on it for 24hrs and it's like a blimmin' jungle again!

    I have another thing that grows rampantly - should imagine it's a weed. It has very loose roots and sits on top of the shingle/flint section I have. it's very fine and has many stemlike things from it - they are a reddy/browny colour. It has pink flowers.

    Come on peeps - name that weed in...
     
  12. cosmosinfrance

    cosmosinfrance Star commenter



    sounds like Geranium robertianum or stinking Robert

    [​IMG]

    is this it?


     
  13. CarlafromCheers

    CarlafromCheers New commenter

    Thank you! Geranium Robertian. Now I know what it is.
     
  14. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    Elderberry trees. Cut them down with a saw - peel off all the twigglies and leaves - use your foot if wearing wellies. Cover with a black bin bag - tie this with tape or string. When new growth appears - as it will - strip it off. Keep doing that and in a matter of only years - the tree will die.

    (Takes a couple of years.)

    I call this the green way to kill unwanteds. It takes little energy to be very mean to plants and does not involve any chemicals.

    Ivy you have to pull out and cut back. Put all the bits in a bin because it will grow from any bit left over. If you can mow it , do so. If it is round a tree, cut off all the bits round the trunk - called ringing. This is not easy and is a pain. Weed killer doesn't work as well as just being very mean to ivy.

    You need to walk round your garden being very mean.
     
  15. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    YES!!!!! You're all very good at 'name this annoying growy thing' Although Stinking Robert is a swine - it's quite easy to pull up and takes very little effort or strength. So although tiresome, I can sit on the floor and just get on with it.

    Geranium huh? I can see that...I loathe stinky geraniums too.

    Thank you so much for your deductive skills.
     
  16. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    Grrrrrrr. Forgot to quote properly, again. The thanks goes to Cosmos who being in France has shown they know their onions!
     
  17. Spiritwalkerness

    Spiritwalkerness Star commenter

    I've been trying but unsuccessfully. I shall up the meanness from now on. And what super tips Nelly, thank you ever so.
     
  18. grumbleweed

    grumbleweed Star commenter

    Bamboo can be tricky if it isn't yours but it can be done. Digging a pond is a great way to control bamboo but it may well not be the right place to have one!

    If you have a fence and the bamboo is popping under it, you will need to get to the rhizomes and not just cut them back. You will have to dig down I'm afraid, although not too deep. Then when you have done that, either sink an extra gravel board or slab on its side down next to your fence. Keep a sort of trench your side so if rhizomes do still get through you will see them. This has the added benefit of also possibly getting waterlogged when it rains which bamboo doesn't really like. This is assuming it's a running kind of bamboo and not a clumping type.

    Did you mean valerian the herb? If so, dig it out and don't let it flower as it self seeds generously. If you can recognise the seedlings whilst you are being 'mean' then hoe them off, this will reduce them over time. They are good in the compost bin if you have one , (and it sounds like you could benefit from one).

    Good luck, I can't imagine life without gardening....
     

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